Anonymous: You opinion of homeschooling...good or bad?

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User - posted on 02/23/2011

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I do homeschool, and yes, I am a certified teacher. HOWEVER, anyone can homeschool and do a great job. All you need is patience, a knowledge of your child's learning style (probably better than a teacher with 30 kids in class!), grade level curriculum expectations (you can get this off the internet), and a good curriculum, even if you mix and match for your child's benefit. There have been so many studies done that find the benefits of homeschooling far outweigh the bad. My children get individualized attention, finish their schoolwork in half the time they would at school, DON'T come home sick, and get all the socialization they need from activities at church, parks & rec., co-ops, friends, etc. If socialization means learning bad words and bad habits from school, I'll pass, thank you. Yes, there are bad days, but one mom quoted this: "Even the worst day homeschooling is better than the best day at public school."

I recommend joining a homeschool group in your area. This supplies the support, ideas, play-dates, etc. that you might be looking for. We've done field trips, started a co-op, discussed curriculum, had guest speakers...

Homeschooling is SO worth it!

Natasha - posted on 08/01/2010

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@ Kati - sometimes I wonder if having a degree to parent might not be a bad idea : ) but that's another topic

Natasha - posted on 07/31/2010

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I am a public school educator and I do believe that often times home schooling can be very beneficial... on the other hand so can a public or private school. It completely depends on the families needs, the students needs and whether or not the possible school the child or children will be attending can fulfill these needs.



It is true that there are some public or private schools that I would question sending my four children to, however most of the people who work in education are in it for the children and not just to get a paycheck. There are many great schools out there.



Homeschool, on the other hand, can also be a great opportunity for the family. However, the homeschooling parent must be ready to make a huge commitment to their childs education.



In addition, as I have seen in so many other responses, the child would be much more successful if they were able to be socialized elsewhere and many areas do have homeschooling groups for support in this area. Look around. This socialization can happen in any form - church, baseball (or other sports), boy scouts or girl scouts, dance whatever you or your child may be interested in.



As far as the transition to college goes. In our school district the schools work with homeschooling families and the homeschooling students are allowed to participate in classes that the school supplies at the request of the parent if they feel that the child may need a little more than the parent is able to provide, such as PE classes or transitioning into a classroom community. Talk to your local school district. They may be able to help you out. You have to do what is right for your family!

[deleted account]

I could tell you that all the homeschoolers I know did well in college. I could tell you that one in particular got a several scholarships and was paid to live on campus and just graduated from Law School. And you don't need a public school to have an ACT score. But instead of me telling you my real experiences, here are some hard facts for you.

You can read the whole 12 pages here:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa...

One of the first questions researchers ask is, "Does homeschooling work, academically?" Many policy makers, educators, school administrators, and parents wonder whether ordinary mothers and fathers, who are not governmentcertified teachers, are capable of teaching their children after age five. Is it possible for adults without specialized, university-level training in teaching to help their children learn what they need to learn?

Many studies have been completed during the past 20 years that examine the academic achievement of the homeeducated (Ray, 2004b). Dozens of researchers have executed these studies. Examples of these studies ranged from a multiyear study in Washington state, three nationwide studies across the United States, and a nationwide study in Canada (Ray, 1994, 1997, 2001c; Rudner, 1999; Wartes, 1991). In study after study, the homeschooled scored, on average, at the 65th to 80th percentile on standardized academic achievement tests in the United States and Canada, compared to the public school average of the 50th percentile.

Researchers, wondering if only certain families-in which the parents have a high educational attainment or family income-are able to homeschool such that their children score high on achievement tests, show that children in homeschool families with low income and in which the parents have little education are scoring, on average, above state-school averages (Ray, 2000, 2004b, ch. 4). In addition, research shows that the parents' teacher-certification has little to no relationship with their children's academic achievement, and that the degree of state control of homeschooling (i.e., regulations) has no relationship with academic achievement (Ray, 2004b).

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Researchers, wondering if only certain families-in which the parents have a high educational attainment or family income-are able to homeschool such that their children score high on achievement tests, show that children in homeschool families with low income and in which the parents have little education are scoring, on average, above state-school averages (Ray, 2000, 2004b, ch. 4). In addition, research shows that the parents' teacher-certification has little to no relationship with their children's academic achievement, and that the degree of state control of homeschooling (i.e., regulations) has no relationship with academic achievement (Ray, 2004b).

ACTs and SATs are the best-known test predictors of success in university or college in America. Both the SAT and ACT publishers have reported for several years that the scores of the homeschooled are higher, on average, than those from public schools. For example, for the 1999-2000 school year, the home-educated scored an average of 568 in verbal while the state-school (i.e., public-school) average was 501, and 532 in math while the state-school average was 510 (Barber, 2001).

Minnie - posted on 07/30/2010

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Kati, why do you think you can raise an infant effectively? I mean, unless you're a pediatrician or at least a nurse who specializes in pediatrics, Kati. Did you need to have your doctor breathing down your neck dictating your every action and choice in how you cared for your wee one?

People who have degrees in childhood education are able to teach large groups of children with multiple learning styles and fit that all to one curriculum.

A homeschooling parent who is the slightest bit enterprising, intuitive and adventurous is definitely qualified to teach his or her own children.

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JuLeah - posted on 06/07/2011

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No way that question can be answered as stated. Too many factors to consider.
The child, the skill of the parents, the public school options in the arer, the home school support in the area ......

[deleted account]

I'm from the US to explain my "land of the free" comment. I realize that might not apply to all places, and is certainly diminishing here.

[deleted account]

I can almost guarantee that anyone arguing for more regulation on homeschooling would give a fit if someone tried to force them to teach their 3 year old specific things or have him/her evaluated yearly to make sure you weren't being abusive. It's the same thing. I think there are pros and cons to homeschooling and public schooling. Homeschooling can be good or bad depending on the parents; public school can be bad or good depending on the teachers, the other kids, the principal, the counselor, etc. There's a whole lot more room for crazy in the public school system. I learned the term "masterbation" from my junior high art teacher, my sophomore year math teacher compared hyperbolas to the shape of breasts, and another high school math teacher, when he wasn't ranting his anti-religiosity, left the room and let us play cards. And that is all nothing compared to my husband's teacher who beat kids up in the school elevator and another one who gave the cheerleaders better grades if they'd sit in the front row and let him look up their skirts. So don't tell me homeschoolers are abusive or should be regulated more when the public school system has crap like that. And I lived in a good area with "good" schools. I had several really good teachers and one amazing math teacher and I had good friends. I was blessed. I don't agree with parents who don't want to expose their children to varying viewpoints at all and I certainly don't advocate abuse. But regulating a whole bunch of people doing a great job in the interest of a few (in homeschooling or other arenas) leads to a whole lot of...well, not freedom. You can't regulate everything and still be in the "land of the free."

Cyndel - posted on 03/01/2011

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I was homeschooled all 12 years, I loved it, had lots of friends and time to socialize, in fact I had more time to socialize because I generally got all my school work done before lunch! I hated having to do school work after lunch, sometimes if it was taking longer then normal I would wait to have lunch till it was all done.

As for collage, I didn't go for long as I married shortly after graduating HS and was only interested in having kids (been that way for as long as I remember, i only wanted to get married and have kids) So I went for a single semester and did great! I loved it! I plan to go back later and become a CNM Certified Nurse Midwife, the only other thing I have wanted to be, though I always knew even at 14 when the idea first occurred that I would wait until my children were jr high-high school age to get the degree or were completely graduated. Though since we have decided to send out kids to private school once they reach high school I'll be able to start sooner.

For every homeschooler I know (and I currently know more then a dozen in college right now) only my brother had trouble adapting to collage and that was because of depression from other aspects of life that had nothing to do with home schooling.

The only time I have trouble with kids being homeschooled is when the parent is too lazy to make sure the kids do the work/don't help them when they need it, expecting them to do it all on their own, or completely isolate the kids as some do. All good home schoolers are annoyed at these 'no' schoolers as they get the public attention and make a bad name for the rest of us.



BTW for those wanting to know I was homeschooled because i live in TN we are in the bottom 5 states with the worst public education in the US. I think there are only three states with worse public education systems then ours. There was also some religious reasons, but that was the biggest.

Cyndel - posted on 03/01/2011

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GOOD!
Every child deserves a homeschool education (meaning a education tailored completely to their way of learning, everyone learns in a different way, and their strengths and weaknesses) But not every parent is a homeschool parent. I am glad there are public and private schools out their for parents who can't homeschool for what ever reason.
It is in the best interest for most children, but not for every family.

Alecia - posted on 03/01/2011

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Depnds on how its done. if i had the skill set to do so, i would prbly homeschool...however, i feel that the school system can do i better job than me....epsecially when it comes to math. I was always a straight A student (except math one in a blue moon would be a B), but there is so much that goes into it and i wouldnt want to just leave my kids to a book and computer by themselves. I also strongly disagree with unschooling becuz it leaves kids so unprepared for the real world. so really, i dont think its bad...it jsut needs to be done in a way where the child can thrive and learn the facts and skills that they will need for a higher education.

April - posted on 03/01/2011

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Deb, may I ask why you were home educated, starting in the second grade? Were your parents displeased with the curriculum in grades K and 1? Just curious! All the homeschoolers I know do it for religious reasons. Just wondering about some of the other reasons...

Amy - posted on 03/01/2011

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I think it depends entirely on how it's done. I was home schooled for a few years until we could sign a form to go to school without our vaccinations [history of reactions in family]. Then we went. We could have skipped grades my mother did such a great job, but she kept us in our age range.

Now, my four neighbor children are home schooled. The 16 year old cannot spell worth a darn. Simple words - not tricky ones - are spelled wrong, your/you're, bin/been -things like that. They are all two years behind in schooling. I'm not sure how it's legal for their mother to allow them to be that far behind, but the woman isn't so bright herself. I think those kids are at a serious DISadvantage.

Truly it is who is teaching and how it's done.

Deb - posted on 02/28/2011

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I was home educated from 2nd grade through high school along with my older brother and younger sister. My brother graduated from med school, worked for the university of Arizona and then proceeded to go to law school. He had a full ride through all of his college experiences and was actually paid to go to school working as a t.a.
I also went to college twice, but I chose art as my area of interest. Photography the first time around and fashion design the second, both times through I was consistently on either the dean's list or the president's list and I graduated with a 3.997 GPA. In case you haven't figured it out by now, college was not an issue for us home-schoolers in fact, I think that we dealt with higher learning much better than most of our class mates.
Do I think that home schooling is for everyone? No way! Some kids are social butterflies that need that social educational experience, but I don't regret my childhood experience for a second. There were times when my mother and I were at each other's throats, but I would not be the person I am today were it not for her and her patience and knowledge that she passed on to me.

Victoria - posted on 02/28/2011

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If the parent is actively involved in the homeschooling, I have no problem with it. There are plenty of homeschooling groups around that can help with any topics you aren't comfortable teaching. The support isn't just for the kids.
If you are just to lazy, or uncommitted, to get up in the morning to get kids to school, than you shouldn't use that as a reason. I know several people who homeschooled their children because "mornings are hard" . . .
If you aren't going to be involved and make sure the kids are ready for college, don't do it. It is a HUGE disservice to your child(ren).
I have several friends who could barely cope with community college because they had never been in an actual class room before.

Isobel - posted on 02/26/2011

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I believe your child's right to an education is more important than YOUR right not to teach them.

and there exactly is my point Lisa...No regulation there AND they're HAPPY about the fact that any fucktard can lock their kid in a basement and nobody would know the difference.

THAT is the problem

Merry - posted on 02/26/2011

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April, we are on the same wave length today, you are just seconds ahead of my every post!

Merry - posted on 02/26/2011

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Thankfully in Wisconsin homeschoolers have rights not to be forced into some sort of regulation. No one refulates your care of your new born, or toddler. So why all of a sudden fo you think parents need regulating to make sure they didn't all of a sudden turn into crappy parents who don't care for their child?
When situation calls for intervention, the law will protect children from bad parenting. But bad education goes on in many public schools, so what's the big deal if a few homeschoolers get a bad education?
It's hit or miss home, private, or public. There's no guerentees your child will get a good education anywhere. Kids graduate from public schools sometimes still not able to read! Bad education is everywhere, and homeschoolers actually have better statistics then public schoolers.

As for sheltering kids, that's up to each family to decide, no one should ever be able to force someone to do things with their child that they feel is wrong. Of course we need to protect kids from abusive families, but it's not abuse to simply shelter your kids from societies crazies.

April - posted on 02/26/2011

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@ Danielle I had a very similar experience to you, only I was in a public school! I was in a program for deaf children, set within a regular public school. There was 1 teacher and 12 to 15 students, all different ages and grade. The youngest kids were 5, with the oldest being 11. I was put in the back corner of the room with a bunch of textbooks and workbooks. Teacher came to check on me just before lunch and at the end of the day, that's it. She told me the other children weren't as intelligent as me and that they needed her more. It was the loneliest 5 years of my life. When I was 11, I went back to school in my hometown with my younger sister. I had no idea how to socialize with kids my own age. I was bullied beyond belief. I will never forget it!

Minnie - posted on 02/25/2011

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I am well aware that there are many very conservative folk intent on sheltering their children through homeschool- we are two years out of a church that was solely comprised of families like that. Who even sought to minimize education for girls because they are expected to be housewives rather than go to college.

But there are many other families who homeschool for freedom of education.

There is regulation. In our state children are individually evaluated by a teacher in the public school system or by the superintendant, or take a standardized test.

Isobel - posted on 02/25/2011

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What leads you to believe that all home schoolers are like you? Or that even the majority are???

There could be thousands of people out there teaching their kid nothing, writing their tests for them and making them work around the house. How would we ever know?

That's why there NEEDS to be regulation.

and head over to the republican conservative page to check out why THEY believe in home schooling if not to keep their kids away from "the gay agenda" and "Obama's communist plans to brainwash America's youth".

Minnie - posted on 02/25/2011

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Didn't go back and read the replies (I think I may have replied earlier?) because this is an old resurrected thread. It seems from more recent posts though that people have a perception of homeschoolers as insanely conservative religious folk who seek to shelter their children from the wicked ways of the world and prevent any sort of higher education. It's not like that at all for many. We belong to a local homeschooling network of over five hundred families and get involved with so many different activities through that.



We are homeschooling our girls to give them freedom of education- to explore whatever subject they wish to and to have the time and resources to do it with. I feel that they have so many more opportunities this way- and we can tailor their education to their personalities, learning abilities and styles.

Isobel - posted on 02/25/2011

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I totally believe that the majority of home schoolers are well intentioned and doing a great job.



I also believe that the home schooled children that DO apply to college and University do very well.



My concern comes in when we start talking about school as a safety net used to catch abuse and neglect.



How many times have we all heard about a teacher or friend from school noticing bruises or being confided in by a friend who was being abused or neglected at home? Removing that safety net and replacing it with NOTHING seems dangerous to me.



I'm not saying that all home schoolers are abusive and neglectful of their children, but I do worry that we can never know how many are...cause there is NO mandated way for anybody to even see if they are still alive, never mind whether their parents are teaching math or not.



We had a woman on one of these debates last time who specifically SAID, I'M NOT TEACHING MY CHILD MATH CAUSE IT'S NOT IMPORTANT!



That is exactly my worry. YES, the children who are home schooled, whose parents did a good job educating them WANT to go on to University and do very well there...what happens to the kid with a huge IQ and a streak for music whose parents just ignore him and leave him to read text books alone by himself?



I simply believe that THAT child deserves a proper education more than his parents deserve the right to teach him whatever they feel like because they didn't want him to hear that it's OK if his friend has two moms or two dads.



In short...I think there needs to be SOME type of regulation (my preference would be a state (province)-wide forum of homeschooling parents who get together and interview and evaluate all the kids.

[deleted account]

I plan to. But both my husband and myself had horrible experiances in school. My husband barely finished high school because of them. I was lucky my parents listened to my cries for help, got me out and into a better school.

I don't see why people have such a problem with homeschooling. It isn't a new thing; in fact school is. Although some students would attend a school type of enviorment as far back as ancient Rome it was only for boys of noble birth and was more of an open forum.

The actual school setting wasn't wide spread until the late 19th centery, even then there were many rural areas where the children were primarily schooled at home. Some schools still go by the harvest schedules.

I don't trust schools. I've had too many bad experiances. I've been called a lier, a cheater, and many other things by my own teachers. I feel that the social enviorment in many schools is like watching Lord of the Flies. It is scary. I have witnessed classmates try to kill themselves as well as others and the teachers do nothing about it. Finally one of them succeeded. It was horrible.

I find it to be just too big of a risk. I don't want to take the chance that my children have to go through that.

My husband got in trouble as a child because he chose to punch the wall instead of the kids that were beating him with books while the teacher watched and did nothing.

There are good schools out there but they are hard to find. I never want my child to come home with tears in her eyes like I did; or be board to tears like my husband was.

I was homeschooled for 2 1/2 years before I got into a private school. My mom had a home daycare so I spent the morning working on math, writing, and reading. During naptime was science and spelling. I also went to programs around the area as well as many sports teams. I would help my mom in the daycare in the afternoon, from changing diapers to entertaining the younger children while the older ones were in their class room time. It was fun. I didn't have friends my age. But I didn't want any. I had been hurt badly by those my own age whom I thought were my friends. The events that happened in school were bad enough they scared me emotionally for life. I still have a hard time socializing with people because of it. I went from being an extrovert to being a major introvert.

Ellen - posted on 02/25/2011

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I agree completely. I have a friend who homeschools her 2 children. They do socialize, but not nearly enough as they should be. They have no independence whatsoever. They are with their mother 24/7. She doesn't trust anyone around her children, so they're with her constantly. In my opinion, she is doing a dis-service to her children, by not giving them any type of independant interaction, with children of their own age. I live in a heavlily populated area, and the public schools here are all A+ schools. Unless you live where schools are not up to par, or if you live in a rural area, where there aren't schools close by, I don't think homeschooling is necessary, but that's just my opinion, and something that I wouldn't choose.

Pansy - posted on 02/23/2011

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I don't know anyone who homeschools. I don't know anyone who was homeschooled except uber religious "weird kids". That's what I thought when I was a teenager anyway.

I think you need to take all the "stats" about homeschooling with a grain of salt thought. I mean, how many people homeschool, compared to how many kids are in the public school system. The only people who can homeschool are households where one parent is home. So that cuts out a lot of lower income families where both parents need to work. Or single family homes.

For all a homeschooler knows, their child might have performed BETTER had they been educated in a public school. The numbers just are not comparable.

Merry - posted on 02/23/2011

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Danielle that sounds awful! :(
That's not homeschooling, that's just ignoring your child with some text books!

Danielle - posted on 02/23/2011

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I was homeschooled once as a child in the fourth grade. My father was a pastor and they couldn't afford the local private school so instead of putting me in public school they homeschooled me. I'll be honest. I hated it. They sat me up a desk in my father's study and that's where I spent the day. They would come in first thing and explain a few things to me and then left me alone. I didn't get out at a specific time. If I wasn't finished I would have to stay in there till it was done. I can't tell you how many times I watched my friends get off the bus and just wished I could go out and play. I didn't get recess or anything like that. The only socialization I got was at church. It was a really lonely yr. My point is my parents didn't take the time to make my schooling fun nor did they actually teach me anything. I was so behind the next yr when I got to go back to school. If you are willing to take the time to actually make it a good experience then I say go for it but if you're not able to then it will do more harm then help

User - posted on 02/23/2011

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Everyone and every child is different,so it may work for some and may not work for others, it is NOT for everyone ,The parents are responsible for their childs education and they should have the right to choose!, responsible weather that be at a brick and motor school online school or homeschool! The CHOICE should be the parent ,cause honestly who knows there child better than their parent !

Merry - posted on 02/22/2011

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All the home schooled people I know who are in college now have gotten financial aid, grants, scholarships, etc.
Colleges prefer homeschoolers because they are better equipped for college then public or private kids.
Home schooled kids already know how to dedicate themselves and learn without teachers helping alot, so in college the professors are like a video school practically because it's just a lecture and not much one on one. So the home schooler is already able to manage without the teacher as much because most home schooled kids do a lot of their work on their own with minimal direction from the parent.

Read that in a college pamphlet my sister had about home schooled kids getting in college.

Anyways, socialization is over rated. Learning how to pick on kids, tease kids, find kids weaknesses, prank teachers, gossip, talk about sex in middle school, peer pressure to be popular, or to be sexy, or to be mean, boyfriends and girlfriends in elementary school, on and on the list of negative socializations goes.
Teamwork is all well and good but often it involves Choosing partners and kids get left out or picked last and this messes up their self esteem.
Or if your kid is good looking, or well off, they have the title of popular put on them and then are expected to 'rule' the others which can lead to prideful, and mean attitudes.

Kids are always segregating each other, different cliques and kids have to fit in one, and then they are mostly stuck with that label until graduation!

So much goes unseen by teachers, mean comments that can erode a kids self worth. Teasing can lead to suicide. Bullies end up in jail alot.

Idk one of the main reasons I will homeschool is to keep my kids FROM the 'socialization' in schools.

Besides, everyone knows the drama in high school is totally stupid and pointless. Who needs that!

Merry - posted on 02/22/2011

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Good if the parent wishes to teach their child.
Bad if the parent doesn't feel they wish to teach their child.

I was home schooled, my husband was home schooled, my cousins were, my best friend was, we all loved it and learned alot and feel it was a good experience.
My sister is getting her phd in particle physics
My brother is getting a bachelors in engineering
My best friend is going for nursing
My husband is getting a criminal justice degree
I'm an avid stay at home mom!
Cousins are still in high school but they are acedemicly advanced and bright.

If the parent wants to homeschool, the outcomes are usually amazing.
I'm planning on homeschooling my kids and I look forward to it alot!

Leasha - posted on 02/22/2011

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I agree Kati! And Lisa, you bring up the pediatrician! The pediatrian to provide health care! Not raise your infant!!!! Hello! Why is it that the teaching profession is so much less valued than any other profession! I'm NOT a teacher, but I help in my daughters class rooms and see the results of the children who's parents give up around 2nd and 3rd grade and send their kids to public schools! What a mess!
I know very few college educated people in my communitiy who consider home schooling a better option. Do I think our educational system is broken! Yes I do. But it's not the teachers who are a fault here!!! We should be pointer our fingers at the top! The federal government! We should be demanding reform for our children!!! Not dogging on teachers! And if you don't know that you join a GYM and not a JIM you really shouldn't be trying to home school.

[deleted account]

Sigh...the same arguments I've already spent two very long posts negating. Homeschoolers CAN be socialized, CAN get into college (with scholarships), DO actually perform better, CAN have amazing life experiences...

Nikki - posted on 08/01/2010

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I have nothing against moms who homeschool their children. But I dont think its the right fit for my son, or any more children I have. I think they need to become well socialized, work as a team, go out and get life experiences and thats not something you could ever teach them. There are so many great schools near me in which I am very confident sending my son too and I think later on that this will also affect whether he gets accepted into other schools. I personally dont think homeschooling him would benefit him by any means, but thats how i feel and thats how I want to raise my children, to each their own

[deleted account]

Kati, thinking back to my education degree...

Classes in multiculturalism - help teachers understand their students of different backgrounds

Classes in classroom management - so I can manage 20-30 kids at one time effectively

lots of theory classes that did crap and don't really apply to a real classroom experience

all the basic lowest courses of every major offered at the university - history, geology, basic science, basic psychology, language, writing, basic math, basic statistics

Children's literature and adolescent literature - basically read a bunch of books and did "kiddie" projects on them

In all actuality, it was just a very broad range of basic, easy classes. Then they threw a few in there that applied to teaching in a classroom setting with at least 20 kids of varying backgrounds.

Yes, I feel teachers in a school setting should have a degree and be considered "highly qualified" (that is two different things). But the truth is, not every school can keep good teachers and will hire people who do not meet these qualifications.

I live in an excellent school district with the highest paid teachers in the state. They can afford to hire teachers with Masters degrees and ph.ds and those that are Nationally Board Certified and all that other stuff. For that reason, my daughter will go to public school.

But if I lived just 10 minutes north or 20 minutes south I would be dealing with terrible school districts that cannot hire teachers with teaching degrees. They will hire someone with a random degree or retired teachers or even students that have not completed their teaching degrees. And the turn over rate is very high. I feel that a stable home learning environment is more beneficial for children that that kind of school system.

Yes, many parents without an education degree can successfully teach their children. My education degree taught me how to teach a multitude of different children in a school setting, but without it, I still have the ability to teach my own, one or two children.

I totally understand that people don't want to homeschool their children. But unless you understand all the aspects of homeschooling, you can't really criticize it. It apparently works very well for most families that do it (my previous post with the link to the study). Kids fare better in academics than traditionally school kids, and are well socialized for the most part. And they perform well in college and beyond. You can't really argue with results. Not saying every parent should homeschool by any means. But I'm saying we should stop criticizing those that do.

Kylie - posted on 08/01/2010

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I'm originally from Tasmania where homeschooling is common and well supported. In the UK where I live now its perfectly legal to home educate, but its not supported, you are completely on your own, and because few people to do it, there isn't a good homeschooling network.

If I lived in an area where there were other homeschooling families and we could share resources and expertise, I would do it, but I would be concerned that because my science and maths isn't strong, I'd be limiting Joseph in future life choices.

I don't particularly like the education system here in some ways, I think its too target driven and children aren't allowed to be children long enough, but I don't think for me homeschooling is the answer. Possibly private school but unless I rob a bank, that isn't an option either!

Rosie - posted on 08/01/2010

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if you all are comfortable sending your child to a school whose teachers didn't even graduate school themselves more power to you. me personally- wouldnt do it in a million years. i just apply that to homeschooling, and don't understand why people who do homeschool don't think they need a degree. oh yeah, you have also seemed to miss the part where i said that i don't think it's impossible to have a smart well adjusted child who is homeschooled. i have many cousins who are mennonite and were homeschooled until highschool. they are all well adjusted, smart wonderful human beings. my aunt did a great job!! i just don't like the idea of any joe schmoe out there who is dumb as nails teaching their kid the wrong things, as well as biased information about different cultures, races, and people. their kids will be bigoted stupid assholes, and that concerns me.

last time i checked you don't need a degree to raise a child, until they do you can't compare the two things.

Charlie - posted on 07/31/2010

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I only know one homeschooler and their daughter does very well , is extremely social and outgoing which i credit her parents for including her in soccer teams , music classes ect .

I think it is a case by case issue , if the parent is educated enough to be able to teach , if they encourage outside socialization , i think academically having that one on one attention can be very beneficial .

Each child is different if homeschooling is better suited to them and the parent can commit then go for it , but i think it should be assessed on the child's needs and parents ability .

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I don't know anyone who was homeschooled. I don't think it's very common in the UK or it may be that you don't hear about it. I think if a teacher working in a school has to do a degree and then a PCGE then someone who chooses to homeschool should have to have those too. At the end of the day it's the parents choice but for us we want our son to A) socialise with children his own age and B) know we gave him the best chance in education.

April - posted on 07/30/2010

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it can be a great choice or a bad choice. it depends on who the educator is. i havoe a friend who homeschools and i've never seen her child do any kind of school work at all (and i spend hours there sometimes). i know it's summer now, but even during the school year i only saw him do one little worksheet and he copied off of his mother.

on the flip side, i watched a documentary about the Dilley Sextuplets (they were homeschooled). their mother worked really hard with them. she took them on field trips to do lessons sometimes (one was a biology lesson in the woods). she taught them latin. and she really was able to separate her duties as a mother from her duties as a teacher.

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When I was in school there were homeschoolers who were secluded and unsocialized, THAT kind of homeschooling bothers me! The other kind where over zealous religious folks try to seclude their children from the realities of life...that bothers me. However, if homeschoolers are going to be doing a bunch of educational activities and be in tons of social groups/situations then I think it can be a good thing...but I still wonder how well that child would do when they get into college? Because as awesome as it is for the child to have their education catered to them life doesn't work like this. My boss doesn't cater to my preferred sleep schedule...taking classes from different teachers helps you learn in all different ways that you would not experience if you were only taught by one person your entire life...

Sarah - posted on 07/30/2010

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If you want to homeschool, more power to ya. Personally, I want my child to go to school, be well-socialized and familiar with the academic process. I intend to push hard for college scholarships and that requires highschool transcripts, a gpa and a standing- none of which you get with homeschooling. Not to mention, I'd have to stay home until they greaduated and that is Not happening!

Stephany - posted on 07/30/2010

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For the most part I don't have much of an issue with it. My only concern is the road bump the child will have to go through when they go on to college, when things are difficult already but they have to adapt to a whole new academic environment.

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Kati, there are tons of "teachers" that are not qualified to teach. So many failing schools are in a pinch, they hire any warm body to be in a classroom. If someone is working on a degree or becoming certified, they will hire the person.

The school I student taught at while I was still a student at LSU hired a retired teacher. This particular woman had dementia. She could not remember the students' names, how could she teach them? My mentor teacher and I had to send a student to her room to remind her when it was time for lunch. Two teachers in that school had quit by October so they spread the students out into the other classrooms. This made each class have over 30 kids. In the second school I student taught at, a teacher was fired. She had a student teacher (one of my friends) and the school decided it would be okay for the unpaid, unqualified student teacher to take her classes. They got away with it for a week before the University caught wind and took my friend out of that situation. They hired an undegreed substitute to fill in for the remaining three months of school.

Obviously, not all schools and districts are that terrible. But if the option was a school like that or homeschooling, I would chose homeschooling in a heartbeat. I know I am personally qualified, but even if a parent was not, I would rather that than one of these schools. Like I said in my previous post, many homeschoolers belong to co-ops that provide support. And a lot of people that run these co-ops (in my area anyway) are former teachers.

Rosie - posted on 07/30/2010

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i have trouble with homeschooling. i would never send my kid to a school and have someone who isn't qualified (by qualified i mean have a degree in childhood education) teach them. i would be appalled if that were the situation. so why do people who don't have a degree think they can teach their child effectively? i'm not saying it's impossible that a child will turn out smart and well when they are homeschooled, i just don't think it's a very good idea.

[deleted account]

It depends. If homeschooling looks like unschooling, then bad.

There are numerous homeschooling curriculums out there that line up with what schooled children are expected to learn. There are co-ops that families can join to get support and help if needed. Many of the homeschooling parents I know personally will have their child tested when the public schools administer standardized tests, just to be sure they are staying on top of things.

I see the huge advantage of being able to go at your child's pace and making each lesson fit his or her personal learning style. Each lesson can be catered to the child's personal interests. If a child is into insects at the moment; math, science, and writing lessons can be centered around that.

For the most part, I wouldn't worry about homeschoolers being socialized. Most that I know are very active in outside activities like church, little league, boy/girl scouts, etc. I've only met one homeschool family that completely secluded themselves. Strange children. Felt sorry for them. But from my personal observations, that is not how a typical homeschool family operates.

Amy - posted on 07/30/2010

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I've seen situations where it is not good, however others where homeschooling worked great! Those parents who do there research and network with other homeschooling parents seem to do a better job at it. Also those family's that have generations of homeschooling as well.

I also think that to help make it work well for the student that joining groups where there kids can at least socialize with other home schooled students works great. Or have the child join the Jim or Art class at the local schools (at least in my area you can do that). Kids need to interact with other kids there age, there are a lot of options in many communities to help with that for home schooled children.

Joanna - posted on 07/30/2010

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If the parent is qualified to homeschool and allows the child to be active in other social situations with peers, then I don't see a problem with it.

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