C-secions linked to childhood obesity

[deleted account] ( 16 moms have responded )

"A new study finds that babies born by c-section are twice as likely to be obese by age 3 as those delivered vaginally."



http://healthland.time.com/2012/05/24/ar...





Do you think c-sections could lead to childhood obesity?



Edited to add:

Explanation from the article.



"Why? It might have something to do with how delivery affects the makeup of bacteria that populate infants’ digestive tracts. During their first year of life, infants born by c-section tend to have higher quantities of Firmicutes bacteria in their guts. Studies show that these bacteria can influence weight: obese adults tend to have more Firmicutes than any other species of gut bacteria, and research in mice finds that reducing the amount of gut Firmicutes lowers animals’ risk of weight gain.



Infants born vaginally are exposed to their mother’s vaginal microbes, while those born by c-section are not. Further, it’s possible that the antibiotics used during Cesarean delivery also influences the population of infants’ gut bugs, which can in turn impact babies’ weight."

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16 Comments

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Kelina - posted on 06/11/2012

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Gah! Just goes to show if you go looking for something you'll find it even if it's totally untrue.

Stifler's - posted on 06/11/2012

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Maybe the high rate of obesity is what leads to a high rate of c-sections, and obese parents may produce obese children.

[deleted account]

I kind of have to laugh at that. I mean seriously what isn't supposedly linked to childhood obesity? It doesn't even make any sense. Where in the world would the connection be? If there isn't a direct connection then it doesn't cause it.

In the end it childhood obesity comes down to the food choices presented to the child. There can be medical reasons, but I wouldn't include that, same for obesity due to medications.

Jenn - posted on 06/07/2012

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Both of my children were c-section births, both extended breastfed successfully and both are thin, healthy and active little girls (8 and 5). I received no antibiotics for my c-section, I have not heard of women that have, though I am sure it could happen. Anything can happen during any birth.

Kristin - posted on 06/05/2012

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My three were all born by c-section and breast fed for at least 8 months. Now aged 22, 20 and 18, none of them are overweight. In fact their doctors usually complain that they are a little underweight. Middle child was told she could not donate blood until she put on 5kg. I think genetics, lifestyle, and other factors contribute more to obesity than method of birth.

[deleted account]

can it contribute to obesity? It depends on way too many factors to say for sure. My dh and both his siblings were born by c-section and none of them (now in their 50s) are obese nor were any of them obese in childhood. All three were formula fed.

Two of my grandchildren (one now 7 and the other 3) were born by c-section and neither one of them were/are overweight. Both were breastfed on demand and self weaned.

Happy - posted on 06/02/2012

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I believe it is a trailed issue. In that I mean, women who have c-sections are less likely to breatfeed successfully and babies who are not breastfed are more likely to be obese. I do not believe it is a direct link from delivery to obesity.

Janice - posted on 06/02/2012

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Well it is quite curious that my c-section, breastfed daughter who was born into a family of naturally thin people is a chunker. She overall eats a very nutritionally balanced diet. I was just inquiring to my hubby yesterday when she may lose the baby fat - she is 2.5.

Obviously since 84% of the babies in the study were not overweight the conclusion is not:
c-section=obesity
Its just one more idea thrown in to why childhood obesity rates have risen so drastically.
We all know the main culprit is the diet and lack of exercise, but it is not the case for all.

[deleted account]

Explanation from the article.

"Why? It might have something to do with how delivery affects the makeup of bacteria that populate infants’ digestive tracts. During their first year of life, infants born by c-section tend to have higher quantities of Firmicutes bacteria in their guts. Studies show that these bacteria can influence weight: obese adults tend to have more Firmicutes than any other species of gut bacteria, and research in mice finds that reducing the amount of gut Firmicutes lowers animals’ risk of weight gain.

Infants born vaginally are exposed to their mother’s vaginal microbes, while those born by c-section are not. Further, it’s possible that the antibiotics used during Cesarean delivery also influences the population of infants’ gut bugs, which can in turn impact babies’ weight."

[deleted account]

They're thinking it's because if a baby isn't born vaginally then it's not picking up the good bacteria from mom. So a baby born by c-section has different bacteria in the gut and it's the same bacteria that's found in overweight adults.

Amy - posted on 05/25/2012

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eh, i had a c section. at three she looks exactly like my vbac son - wiry little gymnasts. No, i don't think they could. Although i will say that i had a difficult time nursing with c section and had to do formula. many mothers with c sections had statistically had problems with nursing. so only link in my mind could be specific kinds of formulas or parents over feeding formula in babies. does that make sense? as in...i know some mothers who just shoved a bottle at the baby because it was crying and didn't take consideration into other factors and sucking = soothing. my daughter sometimes nurses what i call "lightly" when teething. uses me almost like a paci at night when teething. maybe while some babies don't suck strong when not really hungry, a bottle's flow may just get too much in their tummies? and no, not tearing apart bottle feeding. after all, i had to do it, too!

Sarah - posted on 05/25/2012

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I wonder if the study looked at factors such as how the babies were fed. Mothers who deliver by section are more likely to struggle with breastfeeding and use formula instead. Some studies have shown that formula fed babies may be more at risk of obesity than breastfed.

Please note this is in no way a dig at formula feeding mums, nor am I saying that every formula fed baby is obese.

Sally - posted on 05/25/2012

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Rubbish all 3 of mine wherr c sections. They are all a healthy weight. Its what they are fed that ,akes them over weight except in the case of a medical condition.

Louise - posted on 05/25/2012

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What a load of rubbish. What leads to childhood obesity is mothers and fathers feeding their children to much food and to much fatty food. There is no other reason a child becomes fat unless they have a medical condition. All these chubby children breaks my heart as they can only eat what is provided to them. Parents form the childs future and not how they were born!

Lisa - posted on 05/24/2012

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NOWAY!!!! I have three kiddos. 12, 9 and 4. I had all three c section. My oldest weighted 9pounds 10 ounces and my doctor me at the very beginning that I would have to have a c section. My bone structure couldnt handle vaginal birth. I then had my other two the same way. None of my kids are over weight and are perfectly healthy. My mom had all four of her kids c section and none of us are over weight either. I mean if you have to have a c section then you have to have one. I do not think that it leads to obesity. Not eating right and not exercising leads to obesity. I mean seriously.

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