Pitbull...friend or foe?

Danielle - posted on 01/11/2011 ( 47 moms have responded )

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I read the Michael Vick post and it got me wondering. How many ppl out there that are pro pitbull? I am the proud owner of a brindle pit bull named Boss. I also have two children (ages 4 and 7), a maltese and a cat. Both dogs live inside and all three animals get along wonderfully. Let me point out that he is trained (obedience) and not a "backyard" dog. (There is a difference in a well trained dog and one that is allowed to be unruly, that CAN be dangerous) Let me also point out that I'm not looking for judgement. If you don't agree so be it. I want to know if it is (or would be) right for your family. If you don't own one, have you ever been around one and what did you think of the dog?

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Mary - posted on 01/12/2011

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I have two dogs - both rescues. One of them is a pit; he was about 4 when we adopted him, and had been abused by his previous owners. With a lot of love and training, he became the incredible companion and family pet he was born to be. He is NOT inherently aggressive, nor is the breed as a whole. I know many of you have bought into the negative (and uneducated) media hype. Research the breed, and their history, and it becomes glaringly obvious that this breed is NOT any more dangerous to it's owners than the vast majority those breeds deemed good "family" dogs.



http://dogs.about.com/cs/breedprofiles/a...



We'd had my pit a year when I got pregnant with my daughter. I never worried for a moment that she was in any more danger of being harmed by him than any other dog. They simply adore each other, and he is remarkably gentle and tolerant of her attention and affections. This is not to say that I ever leave them alone together; this is not because of his breed. No responsible parent should ever leave a small child unattended with ANY dog, regardless of their breed. In my case, I actually worry more that SHE would harm him; that fool would just sit there and take it.

Kate CP - posted on 01/12/2011

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Actually, this is where canine behavior becomes very interesting. Aggressive dogs, 9 times out of 10, HAVEN'T been abused...they've been babied. They've been allowed to be dominant members of a pack dynamic and it causes them to challenge humans rather than remain submissive. Now, this is in no way advocating abusive or harsh methods of training for a dog! You can maintain a dominant position in a pack dynamic without ever raising your voice or being aggressive yourself.



I have a dog who was very scared and shy of people and men. Everyone said "Oh, she was abused, wasn't she?" Nope. I know for a fact she wasn't abused. She was foundling at only 10 weeks old and placed in a foster home until she was nearly 18 months when I adopted her. When she was a young puppy she was VERY sick and nearly died and her foster parents babied her and NEVER took her out for socialization. The end result? A scared dog who doesn't socialize well with humans.



I had a student once who was a vicious little chihuahua. HATED everyone and everything except his "Dad" (male owner). The dog wasn't abused by women or beaten by any one...he was just babied and pampered and allowed to believe he held a higher pack ranking than he really did. After a few months of simple training (for the humans!) the dog is a lovable, cuddly chihuahua who likes people and is fairly good with kids.



It IS in how you raise the dog: proper training and socialization from a young age are key. If you leave a dog tied up in the backyard with minimal human interaction they dog WILL go bananas and will eventually hurt some one when they do get loose.

Mary - posted on 01/14/2011

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Sherri, I'm not trying to sell you on the breed; we all have our own personal likes and dislikes, which is fine. I guess my issue is with the implication that a pit is "more dangerous" or less trustworthy than any other breed of dog. I also find it a bit funny that MANY boxer fans are so anti-pit, when really, they are exceptionally similar, and both part of that bully breed of dogs. Your boxer is just as likely to bite your children as my pit, or your sister's mix is.

Barb - posted on 01/16/2011

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Since Kate mentioned Petey from the little rascals, i found this and thought i'd share:



And yes, the image of a "pitbull" has changed over the years.

These dogs are not anymore inherently aggressive than any other dog. They are extremely loyal and willingly to please add to that the jaw locking capabilities and their powerful form and people misappropriate the poor creature.

Any dog will go for the throat, shoot, my cat goes for the throat of my dogs.. i think it's an animal thing. But then again, she is the dominate one LOL like right now she is maneuvering over my lap and deciding i'm done typing and it's her petting time. ow.

Laura - posted on 01/13/2011

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Pitbulls, as a breed, are no better or worse than any other breed. People want to label or categorize things in simple "black or white" terms--let's face it, people like to think about things in the simplest form possible! With pitbulls, the simplest label to understand the breed by is "dangerous dog". The problem with this approach to anything is that Life is not black or white most of the time!

In this case the example is "pitbull dog" and we are asked to quantify this breed as good or bad. It is neither! Each dog is an individual with particular personalities, traits, and behaviors. Some pitbulls are sweet and affectionate (I have a BIL/SIL that own a deaf pitbull that is a HUGE baby!) others are vicious. Sort of like people, actually. There are multiple variables that factor into each dog: Breeding stock quality, training, socialization, abuse towards the animal, environment, etc. ALL of these things and more factor into how a dog will react and behave. That goes for any animal, as a matter of fact.

The general discussion on animals that bite is another interesting side topic. If you own a pet of any kind, hamster, bird, snake, or fish, you WILL get bitten at least once! That is how animals communicate with one another as well as the established reason of defense. The trick is to know the difference because not all bites are equal or convey the same message. The dangerous bites are those inflicted out of fear or aggression/anger. Most animals give plenty of warning before hand, though. The next bite that is most likely to inflict harm are those sudden bites as an animal reacts to pain. I worked for a veterinarian years ago who told me that any time an animal bites hard for no known reason, take them to a vet for an exam! That type of bite reaction is most likely due to something causing them pain. The only time our now elderly cat bit my daughter when she was little was due to just this type of problem: "Eddie" our cat bit our daughter when she simply pet him on the head. He had never reacted in such a way before so before we did anything drastic, we took him to the vet. Sure enough, he had a raging ear infection! Our daughter's attempt to pet him had actually caused him a great deal of pain and he "told" her so the only way he could. Antibiotics took care of the problem and he has never bitten her (or anyone) since. He's almost 17 now. The bite to my daughter healed just fine, too, without going to the doctor.

Last point about bites, as most people who own cats or dogs know, there are the "social" bites. These are the light, none-penatrating mouthings that both cats and dogs engage in as a form of play or communication. Some people often mistake this type of behavior as "biting". It really isn't. Training the animal appropriately can minimize or stop this type of behavior since we humans don't communicate that way. Or we could start biting/mouthing back, I guess! Yuck! I think the training works better for all involved. Pitbulls are simply animals that engage in these biting behaviors like every other animal. Big dogs have big bites (which cause more damage), small dogs have small bites, that's all. Interacting with any animal carries risk but ultimately the rewards of that relationship outweigh those risks and are so worth the rewards!

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Jocelyn - posted on 01/17/2011

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Total Friend!
We have a 3 yr old female brindle pit who we adopted. I call her our catdog because she is the biggest suck ever! My children are 4 and 1, and she is great with them. She has more patience for them than I do some days!
Never blame the dog [breed], blame the owner.

Wendy - posted on 01/17/2011

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Pit Bulls are wonderful family pets! We have a 4-year old Pit that is just like "one of the kids". He's gentle, sweet and loyal to the core. I couldn't ask for a better dog. He's very well-behaved when we have the snakes out, which not all dogs would be. We also have 3 cats who our dog has always been very protective of.

Kate CP - posted on 01/16/2011

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The image of the American Pit Bull Terrier has changed dramatically over the years. The original dog looked like this: http://www.akc.org/breeds/american_staff...

Small (averaging between 30-45 pounds), stocky, and with a squarish head and jaw line. Today, the APBT looks more like this: http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/americanpitb...

Much larger dogs (ranging in weight from 50-90 pounds), with broader shoulders and wider jaws. These dogs have been bred with mastiffs to give them their size. The problem with this is you now have the temperament of a APBT (fiercely protective, high prey drive) with the size and strength of a mastiff. Joe Public likes bigger dogs. The problem with that is with bigger dogs comes different temperaments and training needs than your typical "house dog" like a beagle or a schnauzer.

Pitbull-type dogs (because a pitbull is not actually a breed, but a type of dog) are not for every one and anyone looking to own such a dog needs to be very studious in their training with the dog and HAVE THE DOG STERILIZED! The most common type of dog in shelters and pounds today is the pitbull mix. People think "Oh, they'd make such CUTE puppies!" and they breed the dog only to find homes for 2-3 out of the litter and the rest end up in the shelter or on the streets. It's horrible and I can't stand it when people don't spay and neuter. BIGGEST pet peeve of them all!

Dawn - posted on 01/16/2011

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I also found it interesting, in the link you provided; they mentioned that there are some bad breeding practices in the APBT, that larger and more powerful dogs are "grown" so that they have an advantage in fighting....that is a concern. Of course, I guess a true pit enthusiest would not buy a dog like this and would be aware of the type of breed being bought, but what about someone who innocently gets a dog like this?? I agree that what the pit bulls have been subjected to is horrible...the same could be said possibly of chickens that are breed to fight!!??!! Animals may be animals but they deserve to be treated humanly...I can't stand to read or watch stories on the brutality these dogs are subjected too :( :(

Mary - posted on 01/16/2011

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Thank you, Dawn.

My intent is not to convince everyone that they should run out and get a pit because they are the best breed ever. They are not the right dog for everyone any more than a Lab is the "right" breed for every family. As someone who owns and loves a rescued pit, and works with a pit rescue group, I find it nearly impossible to sit back quietly when others state false myths and rumors about a breed that has been horribly abused by humanity. It is this mistreatment by humans that generated not only some spectacularly devastating behavior by individual dogs, but also the travesty of Breed Specific Legislation. Innocent dogs are being victimized, abused, and even euthanized as a result of human cruelty and ignorance, and as animal lover, I will just never be okay with that.

Dawn - posted on 01/15/2011

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So let me add that studies will not convince me to own one or let my child be around one. I have included a link that states exactly what you have said. In fact, it is near impossible to find legitimate information supporting the Pit Bull as a "killing machine", so I will agree that Pit Bulls make great family dogs, but here are my issues with the breed......

"The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion, and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog which is extremely strong for his size."
"By no means are these dogs people-haters or people-eaters. Their natural aggressive tendencies are toward other dogs and animals, not people."
"Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death."
"They are very friendly, but not recommended for most people, because most people do not understand how to properly raise and treat a dog. Problems arise when one does not understands dog psychology, seeing the dog as having human emotions, and ends up with a dog who thinks he is the boss of the house. For a smaller, not as powerful dog, people can sometimes get away with this, however, for a powerful breed, one really needs to understand and follow this concept of keeping a dog."
"Originally used as fighting dogs, the powerful American Pit Bull may go for the throat of strange dogs. A minimum of training, along with the proper amount of exercise and a firm pack leader, will produce a tranquil, obedient dog. Socialize very thoroughly when young to combat aggressive tendencies and be sure to keep the dog under control when other dogs are present. Teach this dog respect for humans by not allowing it to jump up and not allowing it to enter doorways first. The humans must make the dog heel beside or behind them when walking. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success."

These dogs are aggressive in nature, and are designed to kill not just attack and unfortunately many owners are just not capable (or willing, purposefully or not) to put the work that is required. Again, I understand that there are plenty of other strong breeds out there, and I wouldn't take my chances with them either.

Mary - posted on 01/15/2011

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Dawn, you are right that ANY dog, of ANY breed can inflict damage on a child.



However, it is not just media attention and owner testimony that supports the FACTS about the pit bull being a good family dog, and actually better with children than many, many breeds touted to be "good" family dogs.



The problem is not, nor was it ever, the breed itself. The problem is that many despicable humans took advantage of this breeds inherent need to please it's human masters, and trained these dogs to fight. A properly trained and loved pit is no more (and in many cases less) likely to attack a human than a golden, boxer, collie, or cocker spaniel.



http://www.atts.org/stats1.html





http://dogs.about.com/cs/breedprofiles/a...





These links are not media hype. The first gives the results of the pit's temperament testing, as well as those of many other breeds. The second link is a reposting of one I put up earlier, which gives an overview of the breed, and it's suitability as a family pet.



I don't think everyone should own a pit bull, the same way I doubt many people should own a lab, a ridgeback or a grey hound. Different breeds have different needs, and different people have different tastes.



I am, however, sick and f'ing tired of reading what are obviously misinformed or ignorant opinions about the breed based on just about anything other than impartial, factual information. This breed is not "bad" or dangerous. If they don't appeal to you, that's fine, but there is no need to misalign them, and perpetuate the myth that these dogs are more dangerous than any other large breed.

Dawn - posted on 01/15/2011

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I do feel that ANY breed of dog can be potentially hazardous especially if the conditions in the home are not ideal, but I still feel pitbulls are a bad breed and no amount of positive media attention or owner testimony will change my mind. I will never own a pitbull and would never introduce my child to one. I would also be very careful with any breed, especially small dogs. We had a chihuahua and he was a very sweet dog but very territorial, he was old and needed to be put down soon after my son was born. We currently have an adopted mutt who is 10 years old, she is very good with our toddler, but I am still careful with her. We recently got a kitten (don't know what I was thinking!!) and I also need to be very careful.....he either is attacking my son or being attacked, so there is rarely the time they are not closely supervised (those times being when the kitten sneaks into my son's room at bedtime, but I always can tell by my son's highpitched "ah, the kitty" squeal) The point is: animals are animals and respond with instinct, you can never fully trust any animal, no matter how well trained or behaved they are.

Allie - posted on 01/14/2011

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I would own a pitbull!
I personally prefer pitbull's to Chihuahua... I've come across much meaner (and more likely to bite) small dogs such as Chihuahua's and terriers (a jack russell bit off part of my cousin's nose when he was 4... ) But it really just depends on how you raise the dog (and their age I suppose)... I also never let my son go near a dog we don't know unless the owner is present and we ask first.

Courtney - posted on 01/14/2011

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I love pitties! It's all in how they are raised; any dog can be aggressive if it's not brought up right. I live in Ontario and cannot believe they are banned here! There are two cities where they have a law that if they 'think' your dog is even a pit cross you have to put it down!! It's terrible.

Sherri - posted on 01/14/2011

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It may be the case Mary and I am really not disputing your information. As I said I am not against anyone else having them they simply won't and can't work in my home.

Haley - posted on 01/14/2011

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There's nothing wrong with Pit Bulls,it's their owners that don't know how to properly train them and then when their dog attacks someone(or the dog fighting like Vick did) it's blamed on the dogs. There are just stupid owners out there.

Sherri - posted on 01/14/2011

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In NH Pits are legal but you can not get insurance if you own one. No dog is worth that to me.

Kate CP - posted on 01/14/2011

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Sherri: The same can be said for the APBT. They are the original "Nanny Dog". That dog on the Little Rascals was an APBT. They are well known for being very gentle and accepting of children.

Unfortunately, you're right about the liability. Many home owners insurance companies will either drop a policy or raise the rates if it's found out that a "high risk" dog is on the premises (any bully breed, rotties, dobermans, and chows are on the top of the list).

Sherri - posted on 01/14/2011

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Mary I simply don't like Pits. I am sorry but I will never ever be comfortable with one. I am not saying they are horrible, just not for me.

Also boxers are also listed as one of top 10 family dogs. They have a need to be around people and their family. But I am not trying to get into a tit for tat. I think for some people they can be great. For us I could NEVER take that risk and wouldn't. I run an in home daycare. I could never own a pit simply for liability reasons alone!!

Mary - posted on 01/14/2011

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Sherri, you do realize that your boxer is in the same Bully breed family as the APBT, right? Not only that, but both breeds scored similarly in the American Temperament Test Society's temperament tests of all breeds. Actually, the APBT scored slightly higher than the boxer (86% for the pit, 84% for the Boxer).

I'm honestly not trying to start an argument...I have no "my dog is better than yours" issues (my other dog is a ridgeback/boxer mix). However, I do think that there is a LOT of misinformation and misconceptions about the breed. I don't think that everyone should run out and get a pit - they are not the right fit for everyone, any more than a Lab, Collie, or Beagle is the perfect dog for all families. However, I do get a little tired of all of the negative stereotypes that are perpetuated about a breed that really is a great family pet, given the same love, attention and training that ALL dogs should receive.

Kate CP - posted on 01/13/2011

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Chows make me more nervous than pits. I'd rather face down two pits in an alley than a chow.

Christina - posted on 01/13/2011

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i was raised with pit bulls thats all my dad ever had they were great dogs...i could crawl into a pin with our female and her puppies and she loved it never got nervous around me handling her puppies!!and they all NEVER GOT VICIOUS or MEAN around strangers....every pit ive seen have been really sweet.....it is the way they are raised...people like to use those peticular dogs for fighting which is totally unfair to nthat dog because thats how they get a bad rep!!I personally love them and i see them as a friend more than a foe....just my opnion

Sherri - posted on 01/13/2011

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Although I think they are fine for others, I would never want one in my home. I just don't trust them and never would, it wouldn't be fair to the dog in my household. My sister has a pit/lab mix she is the most relaxed easy going dog ever. However, I still do not trust her and will never bend down near her face. I am extremely uncomfortable around and am very cautious with my children around my sisters pit mix (she has never done anything ever) and really sway my kids to just stay out of her path. I am very leary of the breed in general. Now any other breed no problem what so ever. Have had dogs and been around them my entire life. We owned 6 dogs as a kid and now I am the proud owner of a boxer.



Also that is what my mother does for a living. She works with dogs, so even when we go to visit she always has dogs at her home that she is working with. However, she also is not a fan of pits.

Candi - posted on 01/13/2011

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I agree, Laura. I work with wild animals and I have been bitten by 2 owls. One was brain damaged, so her bites are very weak. She bit out of fear. The other is a screech owl. He bit b/c he didn't know me. Now I have no problem with him. We have a kestral at work that will attempt to "attack" anyone who comes near him. The rabbits will thump, the great horned will hiss and clack his beak, the other owls will pop their beaks as well. Every animal has their own warnings, but some people either ignore the warnings or think, Oh he won't bite me. My SIL has 2 pits. HUGE babies. One is deaf and the other serves as ears for the deaf one. They are really great dogs, but I still wouldn't have one

Danielle - posted on 01/13/2011

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Lol it's funny that more ppl have had probs with small dogs than large ones. I had a shihtzu at one time and a man that was an aqantance of my husband came up and the dogs were outside. The man actually took extreme measures to avoid my pit and went straight to my small dog. I got outside just in time to let him know that she would bite..and she did try. She was old and very mean to everyone but me and my kids. I eventually had to get rid of her because she got so bad. It was a long running joke with everyone that she was the most dangerous dog in my yard. Ppl would call and tell me they were coming over and to put the "guard dog" up.

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Personally, I will never own any dog or cat unless it's outside. Right now, we can't have animals outside because we don't have a fenced yard and live in the suburbs. My brother has a pitbull. He's a sweetheart. My mom's stupid chihuahua is a pain. The chihuahua makes the pitbull look like a little kitty lol. The pitbull has been well trained and is very well behaved. That being said, I don't trust any animal even if I've known them forever. We always keep the pitbull in my brother's room when we visit and we move my daughter out of the room when he comes down to go outside. I'm more afraid of him knocking her down because he's so big and loves to kiss. I don't let her play with the chihuahua either though. My grandma's miniature dachshund did really well with my daughter, but again we stay close.

Lacye - posted on 01/12/2011

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I actually don't have a problem with pit bulls. I have problems with small dogs. LOL When we get our own place, eventually, I want either a collie, a sheltie, a golden retriever or a Labrador. I absolutely love the mid-size to large size dogs. I've always had really bad experiences with small dogs.

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Pitbulls are strong dogs, they are a beautiful breed. They get a bad name because of assholes who use them for fighting. if you are aggressive with any animal, they will be aggressive. They only do what is taught to them.

Nikkole - posted on 01/12/2011

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My sister in law has a pit bull he is 1yr i think he is very sweet but kinda dumb and clumsy lol i wouldn't own one because one they are soo strong and i just dont like them i don't think there cute i like fluffy dogs :) and not to mention our insurance company wont insure use if we have a pit bull!! Oh and if any one lives close to me my sister in law is giving away her pit bull she lives with my mil and they wont insure her house till she gets rid of it soo if anyone wants it or knows where we can take it it would be greatly appreciated :)

Jenny - posted on 01/12/2011

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I have 2 APBT's, ages 6 and 7. They are a wonderful breed for educated owners and I will always have at least one in my home. They are the perfect breed for me.



Laci, my girl is a blue and she is beeyootifull.

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If I lived in a place that allowed pets I wouldn't have a problem owning a pit or any other type of dog if I got it as a puppy, had help in properly training it, and/or knew it's history and how it was raised. I love dogs... and cats. :)

Candi - posted on 01/12/2011

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We only had him declawed b/c he was a strictly indoor cat and every time I put SoftPaws on him, he'd sit in a corner and pull them off. I have been around cats all my life, all outdoors without shots, been scratched and bitten and never had a problem. As soon as he bit my daughters, I used alcohol on it. My daughters know I love alcohol. My youngest doesn't mind it! I work with wild animals, so I don't worry about my pet cat. Like I said, its something that happened once in 6 yrs and its been a while. If it was something that happened once a month or something, then I would have a problem with it.

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It doesn't surprise me that a declawed cat is a biter -- that's what happens when you take away a cat's natural defenses. I would say the older he is, the more likely he is to inflict a severe bite because he will become less tolerant.
My boys were really attached to our cat too (as were we -- we had him for 10 years), but we still made the decision to euthanize him because he bit a person. My kids' safety and the safety of others in our house is more important. To me, it was non-negotiable.

BTW, dental cleanings do nothing to eliminate the risk of infection from a cat bite -- cats carry strep, staph and a host of other bacteria in their mouths and, based on the shape of their teeth, that bacteria is deeply injected into a bite wound that doesn't generally bleed much. Shots don't matter either (except for rabies) because the diseases they get shots for aren't what create the risk of infection. Because of this, all cats bites are supposed to be treated with antibiotics within 6 hours of the bite and even then will most likely get infected. Even though your cat hasn't broken the skin on anyone, that still isn't a cat I would have in my house. Too dangerous.

Candi - posted on 01/12/2011

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@ Rebecca, my cat is a strictly indoor cat, neutered and declawed. He is now 6 yrs old. When he bites, he doesn't break the skin and one quick bite, he runs off. He only bites when the kids are petting him in the same spot for too long or pet him too harshly. I'm sure if he could speak, he'd say "cut it out, Enough with the rubbing one spot!" lol. When he does his quick bite, it is always on the hand. He has never gone for any other body part. Like I said, he turned 6 this month and I got him a month before my daughter was born (she will be 6 in June), so he is very attached to her. In the 6 yrs we've had him, he bit my oldest daughter once, on the hand. And he bit my youngest on the hand when she was petting him in the face. He has never bitten me or my husband. He used to bite a friend of ours who would wrestle with him every time he came to visit. Tthe cat got tired of it and walked away after a few minutes. The cat will hide behind corners and jump at our dog, chase the dog, and sit on the stairs so the dog can't go upstairs, so people would say he is mean to the dog. I agree about the 'biting' animals. I got rid of a full blooded mini daschund b/c he bit my daughter in the face while she was just standing there doing nothing....he was gone that same day. Biting is my cat's only defense, since he has no claws. He does get professional dental cleanings and always up to date on shots, so I don't worry about the little bites. Its been a while since he's done it and I think the older he gets, the less likely he will be to do it, unless he turns into a grumpy old man

Danielle - posted on 01/12/2011

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I'm gonna try to put all my answers to the posts in this one post lol.My bullie isn't neutured yet. We took him in when this sweet couple were having to move and they were going to have to put him down. B/c they couldn't find anyone to take him. My husband had lost his job so that wasn't in our budget but he now has his job back and I plan to have him neutured later this mnth b/c you're right, they are more aggressive when they are not neutured. Not to mention I caught him humping my poor couch lol. Before I owned a bullie I was one of these ppl that wouldn't even pet one. No one I knew had one and all I had heard was how bad they were. Then someone gave my husband and I absolutely fell in love with her.Some one actually stole her b/c she came from a very expensive fighting stock. My parents were my worst critic about how irrisponsible I was being but then they actually got to know Boss (our dog now) and love him. I've done a lot of research on the breed (not to mention the dog I own) and yes it is right that it's in how you raise them but it's also true that it's in their bloodline. I have had a bullie before that just out of the blue decided cats were better if they were in pieces. As much as I loved him I refuse to keep an animal that is a killer. I found him a nice home with someone who knew how he was and was prepared to take the responsiblily of him. The bloodline he came from was a fighting bloodline. @ Laci- I would highly discourage getting a blue dog. They are very unpredictable and can be very dangerous. To keep them blue breeders usually breed mothers back to sons and cousins. There is alot of inbreeding in their line. I tried my hand at breeding them and that's what I was told to do. I quit breeding b/c so many ppl are breeding them in their backyard and I couldn't bring myself to sell to the ppl that wanted to buy them. I had one litter of 9 and wound up giving each and everyone to family and friends. I now disagree with breeding them and I encourage everyone to adopt one (if they want one) there are alot of dogs out there right now that need a good home, and at the end of the day there's nothing better (besides my kids) than bullie sugars =)

Meghan - posted on 01/12/2011

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http://www.petsdo.com/blog/top-ten-10-mo...

Bahaha, I had a Presa/Pitbull before my son was born. She was the most beautiful dog-but she needed a lot of attention. She wasn't aggressive BUT when me and my ex separated she stayed with him and he didn't give her enough attention. A result, she bit someone, ran away for a week and then he found her...and still has her. To my knowledge he didn't put her in training or anything and I have made numerous requests that she NOT be around my son. He says she is fine. Pitbulls are a type of breed that CAN be great pets, but if they bite once my trust in that dog (not the whole breed) is GONE, and it would be the same if it were a shitzu

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That's because pit bulls tend to do more damage when they attack because of their builds and of how aggressive they are when they attack.

In our area, most pit bull owners have unneutered, male dogs. An unneutered dog is more aggressive and more likely to wander and, accordingly, bite, so I'm 100% opposed to having unneutered pit bulls unless they are for breeding purposes, which is why I asked if your dog is neutered.

I don't trust my kids around ANY animal -- I don't really care what it is. All dogs will bite given the right circumstances and, given the size of a child, a dog bite can be lethal or disabling, particularly if on the face or throat.

Personally, I think any animal that bites a human more than once should be put down - that includes cats. Some should be put down after one bite, depending on the circumstances. That is particularly true for cats. Any doctor will tell you that cat bites are actually more dangerous than dog bites because 85% of cat bites get infected. We had to put our cat down last year because he attacked a guest in our home and bit her severely (he jumped up on her leg and bit her mid-thigh). Everyone we discussed it with (the breeder, two vets, etc.) all said that a cat that bites can never, ever be trusted not to bite again (because it is unusual for a cat to bite to begin with since they normally use their claws for defense). Candi, I’m surprised you would trust a cat that has a history of biting around your child. I’d be curious to know under what circumstances that cat has bitten before.

Amber - posted on 01/12/2011

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My family had several full blooded pit bulls when I was a child, and they were all huge babies. We actually had a black lab that was aggressive and we have put down, but never a pit bull.



My aunt's golden retriever turned on her son and tried to bite him, he was a baby and not touching the dog when it happened.

In my experience, I've had more problems with non pits than I've had with pits.



I find it a bit odd that dalmations, huskies, chows, and boxers are all dogs that are highly likely to turn on owners, but people only seem to have a problem with pit bulls.



I think it's more about training and treatment of animals than anything else. I currenly own a yellow lab and a german shepard, both have been to obedience training and have been socialized with children since their adoption at 10 weeks.

Candi - posted on 01/12/2011

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This kind of post will lead to arguments. It happened just a few months ago. I do not like pits and wouldnever own one. We had neighbors who had them when I was a kid. We could get out and play with some of them. 2 of them were retired fighters and although we could pet them, we knew they were not always friendly. On my brother's 17th b-day one of the retired fighters bit him (hard). Luckily my brother jumped at the right time and the wound wasn't as bad as it could have been. Police arrived with paramedics and asked my brother if he wanted the dog put down. He said "no. the dog was doing what most dogs would do, she was protecting her property and her puppies." We were good friends with the neighbors and they were very sorry for what happened. One bad apple will ruin a barrel. My husband and 2 of my friends were bitten (face and neck) by a Saint bernard, cousin bitten in the face by a doberman (destryed her face at the age of 4), I was bitten by a rottie. My son's 5 yr old friend was bitten by her aunt's St B and it took her entire eyelid off! At the age of 5, she had 88 stitches on her eye. She had been taking a nap with the dog, got up to go to the bathroom, came back and was bitten! Took barely a second. No dog is perfectly safe no matter how they are raised. I think my cat is meaner than a lot of dogs I have met, but he sleeps with my daughter at night. I have no issues, but I know he can bite and he has in the past! Cats are usually the type to bite once then walk away in victory. Dogs are multiple biters and thats why they cause more bodily harm. If you have a pit in your family, bravo to you and thank you for helping a breed that is frowned upon my so many. They do carry a bad reputation and its sad that it has come to that. When we decide to get another dog, it will be a lab or beagle. Thats just my preference.

LaCi - posted on 01/12/2011

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I have a thing for blue pits, but I don't own one, and Its not a breed that's on my list of future pets, only because its just not one of my favorites. I don't have any issue with them though. Any problems with pitbulls are problems with the owners.

One of my ex boyfriends was attacked by a pit that was owned by the guy who was staying in his guesthouse. That dog was vicious, the fact that it was a pit made the wound worse, but it wasn't the dogs fault. It was the asshat that lived in his guesthouse's fault.

Amy - posted on 01/12/2011

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I know people say it's how a dog is raised....but I think some things are just bred into them. we had a great pyrennese [sp] that were at one time made to protect sheep from wolves and we were watching some special on animals - wolves and she started PACING like crazy looking for it. She never did it with sounds of other barking dogs, other animals, nope, she was lazy and could care less, a sound of a wolf or coyote....i don't know, she just kinda "patrolled" the house until the program was over. My dogs are golden retreivers. also had them since puppies. they will NOT play tug of war. they bring something and drop it. I didn't teach them that.
Call it instinct, call it nature, bottom line, heck no I would never ever trust a pitbull. I have been around some and the looks they sometimes got...scared me. Any dog can snap at any time for any reason, true. With little ones, dogs have a history. some have a safe history, some don't. If I were to choose a dog, i'd pick the most docile dog i could find to be around my kids. not worth the potential hazzards to me.

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Pitbulls are on the dangerous dogs register in the UK and so only a small number of people can legally own them. To me this says they are dangerous dogs when people who do not know how to train them properly have them, I know all dogs can fall into this category but some breeds are renowned for having a very gentle temperament for the majority of the breed.

I am not really a pet person and will probably not have any pets again (as a kid I had 2 Staffordshire Bull Terriers and 2 cats and as an adult I have had 3 cats). But if I do ever decide to have a pet, I won't have a Pitbull (because it is illegal) and my hubby doesn't like staffs, he thinks they are dangerous, we would be likely to have a Cocker spaniel because my SIL and BIL have them and they are really lovely dogs.

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