pushing babies.

Amy - posted on 05/19/2011 ( 184 moms have responded )

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I'm on several different groups and left and right I am seeing women being induced 36/38 wks. Even midwives sweeping membranes at 38 wks. What do you all think about this?

I think the baby is in there for so long for a reason and unless medically necessary to induce, leave it alone. Yes, it can be miserable, no it's not "comfy" to be pregnant, but it's part of motherhood. Deal.

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[deleted account]

Do you guys not get 12 week dating scans then? In the Uk as a standard we have 12 week and 20 week scans and then if they feel they are necessary further scans (so I had an early scan at 8 weeks due to bleeding and have had 3 further growth scans due to my first childs small size and my pre-eclampsia coming back - healthy pregnancies don't get these additional scans).

Do you have any evidence to back that claim up Sherri? It doesn't seem acurate to me knowing that for healthy pregnancies in the UK they allow women to go to 40+12, surely if the risks were drastically higher for complications and life threatening complications they wouldn't allow that? To me it seems that as you guys have to pay for your treatments the longer the doctor leaves you (up to the 12 days over) the more chance you will spontaneously go into labour and the less chance the doctor has to charge you for un-necessary treatments as induction of labour is far more invasive than spontaneous labour, what with fetal monitoring, maternal monitoring, induction meds, the increased want for pain meds and the risks of further complications leading to the increased risk of needing forceps/ ventouse delivery or c-section due to a failed induction. It seems to me that financially it is far better for the doctor to induce earlier in the US than allow you guys to go into labour naturally which would mean he makes less money from you.

Sally - posted on 05/20/2011

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But if we stop inducing babies well before they are ready, we won't get to have as many cesareans for "failure to progress". And they wonder why so many babies are being born so small and with so many health problems. The OB industry is stupid.

Sally - posted on 06/16/2011

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Ultrasounds are NOT nearly as accurate at estimating the age or size of your baby as doctors would like you to believe. The later in the pregnancy, the less accurate they get. Your or your doctors convenience is NOT as important as the health of your baby. And most doctors will lie to you to scare you into an induction if they want it and you don't.

Giacci - posted on 05/26/2011

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i had my first son at 39 weeks because my doctor thought he was big and i wouldnt be able to push him out if he got any bigger. He had to be delivered via c-section because his head just WOULDNT pass thru. He came out healthy accept for having jaundice. My second baby however was a repeat c-section. I personally think my doctors were retarded bc im pretty sure i know when i got pregnant and i know when he shouldve been born but they insisted on my going in for the section at 39 weeks (which with my calculations was 3 weeks earlier then that. He came out 6 pounds 15 ounces, and had to be in the nicu for 3 weeks due to RDS. the day he started breathing on his own was the calculation that i had for the day he was supposed to be born, which was my deceased fathers birthday. I will NEVER make the mistake again to go in to the hospital BEFORE i go into labor. BECAUSE you NEVER know if they are right about the due date. as eager as i was to meet my son i regret it 100 percent because he didnt come home til he was 3 weeks old and he had an i.v. and a tube down his throat into his lungs. NEVER will i go in before nature tells me my baby is ready again. If you rush it you may be sorry. as much as the end of pregnancy sucks, trust me IT HURTS WAY WORSE SEEING YOUR BABY WITH A TUBE DOWN HIS THROAT BC YOU DIDNT WAIT FOR HIM TO TELL YOU WHEN HE WAS READY...

April - posted on 05/21/2011

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i just learned out the pregnancy wheel in my OB/GYN office. It is based on women who have a 28 day cycle and ovulate on day 14. Those are the stats they use to help estimate due date. I WISH I had known specifically how they calculate due date back when I was pregnant in 2008. I knew it was only an estimate, but have since learned that because not every woman has a 28 day/day 14 cycle, that estimate can actually be several weeks off!! I figure this is the reason my son was so darn tiny when they surgically removed him (a week before his EDD )from me for no reason other than doctor convenience. I have a 33 day cycle and ovulate somewhere around day 19-20. I wish I had been smart enough to say, "thanks but i will wait until my baby is ready to come out before i return". I also wish I had been smart enough to just leave the hospital and go home. They did give me pictocin and tried to get my cervix to open, but they did not break the waters nor sweep the membranes. I definitely regret not doing the proper research. Instead, I just blindly had faith in my OB. Thanks to her, I probably gave birth to a 36 week preemie just so she could be home in time for Christmas (he was born dec 22)

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Jessica - posted on 08/13/2011

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Sara, looks like we were trying to say the same thing. ^.^



Nothing like that should be routine(standard), but should be done when needed.



^.^ see? I suck at explaining.



YAY! No argument with Sara this time. *hell freezes over* oops. ^.^

[deleted account]

All I'm saying is that it shouldn't be standard. Any intervention should not be standard. They should be done when necessary.

Merry - posted on 08/13/2011

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I would never get an episiotomy, I figure I'd rather let my body do it's thing, if I tear so be it but honestly I tore with my first, one stitch required, but no tearing with my second. Maybe it was the water birth, maybe the fact I had no drugs and could feel it all, who knows but they were the same size at birth so I think I could have avoided tearing with Eric if I did things differently.

[deleted account]

I agree with Sara I don't see the need for an episotomy to be standard, I understand sometimes it is necessary and if you wanted one Sherri that is up to you, personally I would rather risk tearing than be cut....I did tear with both the first time was a small tear that was left with no stitches, it took a couple of days to heal; the second was a first degree I was given stitches (which was the worst part of the labour - the numbing injection was like burning torture and I still felt some of the stitches) but once the stitches were in I had no pain just a little discomfort, so I can see why you choose to have an episotomy, personally I would rather have the chance to not tear ((even though I did) and have no cut though.

Jessica - posted on 08/12/2011

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This is true. however, no a lot of hospitals have all those things here... unless you can afford to fork out the cash for a private hospital.

The only thing offered with Rowan, was walking, something I should NOT have been doing at the time, but again, my doc was a complete moron.

Due to layers of scaring, my birth canal is too narrow to deliver anything too big, and unfortunately, though they knew this, and they knew the boys had huge heads, my doc was a dumb-ass(In fact he didn't even tell me he knew... I had to find out later). He didn't even tell the anesthesiologist about my spinal problems(by the time I caved on the "drugs" I had been through 52 hours of hard labor and I was tired, and going into distress so they tried to give me an epidural which ended badly because of the docs stupidity). What moron doesn't tell the person putting a needle in your spine, that you have a twisted/curved spine? obviously my doc was.

on to induction. Their is a simple way to induce involving no drugs. It is called breaking the water. The drugs for induction should be used as a last resort.

Sherri - posted on 08/12/2011

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FYI you don't feel getting an episiotomie as I didn't have any drugs with any of my kids.

Well all I am saying is don't knock them for everyone for people like me they are an absolute necessity and life saver. Just because you opt not to have one. The only reason I got the two of them was because I was beginning to tear and it saved me a ton of pain because I could not stretch large enough to fit the head without tearing.

[deleted account]

Because not everyone tears. If you get cut, then you're cut. How do you know you would or wouldn't tear? Even if you had a tear in a previous birth it does not mean you will tear again. I tore both times (the first time was because I was coached to "purple push" and instructed to push through the ring of fire. I didn't know any better at the time, but my doctor should have. That's a big no-no. When my daughter's head popped out I tore). So I may not have torn at all my first time had I been allowed to push when I felt the urge. Anyways, even after tearing twice I would never, ever let anyone cut me unless I was going to absolutely explode. It's still an intervention and I prefer little to no interventions unless they are absolutely needed. Also, I don't get epidurals. So if my doctor/midwife cut me, I would feel it. When I tore the skin was so stretched that I was numb.

Sherri - posted on 08/12/2011

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Why do you knock episiotomies. I personally would never have a birth without one. I have had episiotomies with two and tore with one. The tearing with one took me weeks of trying to heal and was plain torture. The two I had episiotomies with I was back to normal within 48hrs.



@Sara I also think it depends where you deliver. The hospitals around here all advocate walking, advocate low lights and a very quiet atmosphere. Ask if you would like to sit in a whirlpool tub once you hit heavy labor that all birthing rooms are equipped with it you desire or you can lay in bed. It is all about what you want.

[deleted account]

Lol! Just saw this funny video on a blog about how it's hard to relax and let your body do it's thing when you have a room full of strangers pestering you:

[deleted account]

No one is arguing that things *could* go wrong. Everyone knows that there is a possibility of complications. I'm pretty sure I've read every post in this thread and people who are against these interventions also understand that they are medically necessary every now and then. Inductions, pitocin because mom is "stalling", c-sections, episiotomies, etc, etc, are way overused in the U.S. In a low-risk pregnancy that woman (if left alone) will more than likely have a birth free of complications. That same woman could end up with a c-section when she's given pit because her 1st stage of labor is taking longer than her doctor says it should (pit can cause fetal distress because it causes more intense contractions that are closer together which leads to a c-section...) One intervention usually snow balls into many others. I just hate that pregnancy and birth are treated as an illness that has to be "fixed." Our bodies know what to do, but they're rarely given the chance.

Jessica - posted on 08/11/2011

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Sara, you misunderstand. I am not going "omg lookout" I am saying that although it IS a beautiful and wonderful thing, that you are taught to always be ready for that time it all goes wrong. I was saying the possibility is always their, not that it was..... gr. man do I suck at explaining things. OK, when you ride a bike you wear a helmet and when you deliver babies you are ready for whatever freaky thing might happen. does that make better sense?



the definition of danger is pretty broad. I probably should have used a different word... but I cannot think of one.



It is a personal habit of mine to remind people of the side of things they ignore. If you were sitting here talking about the dangers(things that could happen) and ignoring the beauty, then I would point that out instead.



annoying habit I know.



Is that clarification better Sara?



Also, the LAST thing you tell a pregnant woman is the things that could go wrong, unless they are high risk. They are already thinking at a mile a minute and telling them that will just make them panic or stress.



This is my honest point of view, from what I was taught by others during my apprenticeship's(I wanted to broaden my knowledge by going through more than one person). in short. this is what a midwife is told her responsibility is. If something goes wrong, be ready. this is the most dangerous (so many thing CAN go wrong)thing a woman can do.



You may not agree, but if you started having serious problems, and you have a midwife, it's her job to not only spot it, but make sure you make it with your baby. the point being... your taught not to be ignorant to the mother and what is going on...hmmm.... another way to put it... if we become complacent, and something goes wrong, and we are too comfy with routine, then we can make mistakes. the basic teaching with teaching the dangers(things that could happen) is that we stay prepared.



make sense?

[deleted account]

I know. I'm from the U.S. I just had my second daughter at a birth center with a midwife. I've looked every where and I cannot find one midwife that says "birth is dangerous." In their philosophies they all say something about birth being natural, normal, safe, beautiful, etc. Here is one definition I found, "Midwifery care is based on a philosophy of pregnancy and birth as normal physiological processes." That's why I was so confused that your attitude about birth would be that it's dangerous. Yes, some women have complications. Some women need hospitals and some women need c-sections and inductions, but that shouldn't be the norm.

[deleted account]

My niece was born vaginally and she had her hand over her eye and my hubby was 10lb 4 again born vaginally (I think that's terrifying Poppy is 10lb 4 now, FairPlay to MIL for giving birth to him). I do agree not all women are able to birth big babies, but they are few and far between if women are given the chance to try.



ETA: hubby was 10lb 7 not 10lb 4 so even more respect for birthing him lol :-)

Merry - posted on 08/11/2011

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Idk about babies being too big for women, my brother was 10lbs 8oz.......vaginal home birth :)

Can't say it's too dangerous, I think when women are healthy pre pregnancy, healthy in pregnancy, they have very very small risks in birth.
I had a home birth, in the birth tub for my second and nothing about it seemed dangerous. It's life, sure anyone could up and die at any time, but over all I'd say birth is not something I'd lose sleep over worrying about the dangers.
Oh and my cousin and daughter both were born with an arm next to their heads! So head and arm together both fit our in vaginal home births :)
It's a pretty versatile hole :)

Jessica - posted on 08/11/2011

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Sara. It depends on who you talk to. I have all the training, and if push comes to shove, I am not afraid to offer advice, or deliver a baby, but here is something. In America, the apprentice system is not... supported... as it should be. I need to pan out money I don't have, to be certified, for something I don't charge for.

when I am needed in emergency or when I am asked, I will preform the sacred duty I was trained to do, however, according to my government, well... they don't say I can't, but they don't say I can either. Depends on what state you live in. Midwifery in general is not nurtured here so... everyone knows I don't have a piece of "paper" from some school or organization, saying I am a midwife, but... yes I do step up when it is necessary. I let them know though, what is "missing" though.
so... you see. your question is a little more "controversial" in its answer. I have the training, actually I trained more than most do, however they don't make it easy to be able to list yourself as one, and to be honest, I am perfectly happy just sticking with it as is. this way, if I have someone who needs me, I can pay attention to her and her child... not... all the crap they load it with.

I don't have that kind of money, and financial aid is more difficult to find and get, than they make it sound. someday I will go "take the test" and whatnot but... for now, it all depends on how you look at it.

If the ability and knowledge are more important, then yes... but if you put more stock in a piece of paper... then your opinion may be different.

Sherri - posted on 08/10/2011

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With modern medicine childbirth deaths has drastically decreased now in the US only 16 out of every 100,000 live births end in a maternal death in the US.

[deleted account]

Just posting out of boredom..lol...just want to interject to say that my VBAC baby didn't have a cone head. Nice round head. She came so fast she didn't have time to form the cone head. And she ripped me wide open because of that. :/ And least she was pur-ty.

Anyway, I'm not going to debate the 'childbirth is dangerous' thing. I don't have enough info.

[deleted account]

Could you explain further: "I trained in midwifery" Are you a midwife?



Women do die every year in childbirth related complications and a majority of those complications are due to interventions. C-sections are extremely dangerous, yet 1 and 3 women in the U.S. have them. Have you ever seen "The Business of Being Born"? Tons of amazing information in there about birth in the U.S. Have you heard of Ina May Gaskins? She is a midwife with several books on childbirth out (all with credible resources). She talks about how it is extremely rare that a baby be too big for the mother's pelvis. She has had babies get stuck in the birth canal before but has the mother get in certain positions that increase the size of the pelvic opening (like getting down on all fours) to help get the baby out. And with c-sections the baby's head will come out perfectly round. When born vaginally the baby's head molds to fit through the birth canal. That's why their heads look a little cone-like. When my second daughter was born her head measured 12.5 inches (actually a little smaller than my first), but when we saw her pedi at 3 days her head rounded back out and was a half inch bigger (since it was in it's normal shape as opposed to the head that just got squeezed out the birth canal). If you have Netflix "The Science of Babies" is a pretty neat film. It talks about birth and the mother's pelvis in the begining. The Business of Being born is also on Netflix.

Jessica - posted on 08/10/2011

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It's like climbing a mountain. some people fall and some people don't. Some women go on with minimal risk and STILL die in childbirth... and some have all the risks in the world and have a smooth labor and delivery. I am just saying, just cuz it doesn't happen to some people, doesn't mean the danger isn't their. Maybe danger is just taken as a more negative word... but things still can and do happen. Not trying to scare anyone or anything but to me, I was taught this as an awareness issue while apprenticing under midwives. "Expect the unexpected. This life is being brought into this world, and it isn't easy. Be ready just in case..." thats something I learned first off. Many women never have an actual problem, but I am saying that it still COULD happen, kinda like climbing that mountain. Some people just have an easier time with it, but the risk is still their. I just think so many people ignore those things as not important that even the doctors get arrogant. I have so many issues, I have to use an OB, not a midwife, myself, so I went through this arrogant jerk whoa jerk who treated it like no risk when I was high risk, and almost killed me twice, and my boys with me. While I agree we can minimize the risks and actually prevent some... their is always that chance. That's all I was saying. As a mom though, I also understand that you should not be stressing about it when that chance may have no way to stop it or it may have many. I was only pointing out that its always that chance. Besides, I think they treat it too routine. NO pregnancy is exactly the same. Delivery is also never the same. Routine actually increases the risk because docs become to comfy and then when the crisis comes many either ignore it, or freak out like children who have just been told Santa clause is a story(my mom told me he existed as long as I wanted him to). A lot of it is human error, but I was just saying, that the first thing I was taught, and have witnessed in action(I have yet to actually lose someone as I am obsessively prepared.. but I am also aware that someday it will happen), is actually true. Sometimes complications and or problems shoot in from nowhere and nobody knows how or why. Sorry. I have an explaining problem. I must explain everything or nothing at all... and its a rare day I don't explain.

And yes. He is a good for nothing right idiot. I will celebrate my freedom from his clutches of legality... since religiously we have already been unbound... the "law" is the only thing saying it so... I will be glad to be free.

[deleted account]

Stephanie always expect a response it is a debating community...it's what we do :-)

Nobody is saying that it isn't dangerous for SOME women but for the vast majority it is not dangerous,no more dangerous than crossing the street!

Oh and good for you your soon to be ex hubby sounds like a right idiot!

Jessica - posted on 08/10/2011

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I was referring to the things that can go wrong, regardless. I know it stretches... but only so far. Their heads were REALLY big.... like your cervix does not get that big kinda thing. Some people have that tendency. I just joke they were born knowing they were gorgeous babies and it inflated their heads before hand. gotta laugh it off somehow.

And having babies IS dangerous, but rewarding. We may be built for it, but you have to remember... something that great has it's risks. I think people forget that with modern medicine always expected to save us. It does have it's advantages. Before modern medicine, either it would have been an archaic c-section, which would have been less mommy survival rate, or we would have both died... thus erasing two boys(because if I died with the first one, the second, obviously would not have been even conceived), and woman die in child birth every single year, more than who die in natural disasters... of COURSE it is dangerous, and risky. You are bringing a LIFE into this world. some woman just have more risk and some have less risk. I trained in midwifery. That is one of the first things I was taught.

For the record, that husband of mine is about to receive divorce papers if everything goes well.

wow... I didn't expect anyone to respond..... let alone the whole opinion about my kids heads and childbirth not being dangerous....... -_- ......

[deleted account]

What a lovely husband...your on bed rest but he wouldn't help leading to you needing an emergency c-sec...I hope he feels guilty about putting you and your child in danger by not helping!

As for birth being dangerous like Sara said for most women labour is perfectly safe, it is what our bodies are designed for, it is actually rare that a woman's body cannot labour without help, but modern medicine has women thinking that birth is dangerous and they need the interventions.

[deleted account]

"Having babies is dangerous but rewarding."



Performing unnecessary interventions on a pregnant woman/woman giving birth is dangerous. Having a baby naturally is not dangerous. It's so sad how our society views birth. In most cases it's not a huge, scary ordeal (unless made that way by interventions). That hole stretches pretty well too, you know ;)

Jessica - posted on 08/09/2011

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hmm... I also belong to many groups... and I can also tell you. If the mother is in distress, or about to go loony... sometimes it is needed... and I do consider that medically neccessary. me for instance. I was under extreme stress, high risk, beginning to tear, and my mental state was about to crack, I mean REALLY crack from the consectutive pregnancies and worry bc I was on bed rest but STILL doing evrything I wasn't supposed to do bc it needed done and my husband wouldn't do it.... so.... I had an emergency c-section... but other than extreme cercumstances, I do agree it is done too much. a common reason though is the baies size. some women just make babies TOO well, and will not be able to deliver them if they carry much longer. even born when he was, and for all those reasons, had a huge head, and would not have made it through that hole... so... I think it depends on the doc, the woman, the baby, and all factors. Having babies is dangerous but rewarding.

Ashley - posted on 08/04/2011

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I think that too many times dr's want to make their schedule over that of nature. I am so grateful that both my boys were not super late but they did go full 40 weeks plus. Yes with my second I wanted him out sooo badly but my dr would not discuss induction until I was 41 weeks and 5 days lol. our bodies know when it is time to give birth and unless we are medically needing induction I think let nature take it's course.

Angela - posted on 08/01/2011

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Im glad I live in New Zealand..! that's just crazy - unless it's medically necessary of course, - and what does it say about the future mother? oh I couldnt be bothered holding on until you were due and ready... does that relate to oh I cant be bothered with everything motherhood involves because it impacts too much on my comfort?

[deleted account]

If given enough time to heal after a c- sec, they advise you have a gap of two or more years since your c-sec and your next pregnancy then the risk factors are minimal.

Vbacs increase the risk of an emergency c-sec from 1 in 5 for a first pregnancy to 1 in 4 for the vbac.

The main risks are for scar rupture and that is low, There is a 0.5% chance of scar rupture if you go into labour naturally, compared with 2% chance when induced (for a vbac). The risk is the vbac failing and having to have another section.

Of course the chance of success depends on why you had the section in the first place, but just because you have previously had a section doesn't automatically mean you should have another.

Rachel - posted on 07/31/2011

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I was induced with my oldest who is 4 when I was 39 weeks because I was already 2cm dialated for about 3 weeks and i have scoliosis and sciatica and couldn't even walk any more so they induced me. it was horrible I was on pitocin for 18hrs was in labor for 36hrs having active contractions and had to have medicine so i could tolerate all of the pain because I was having back labor it was horrible so i ended up having to have a c section because after all that they realized that i could never deliver a child naturally due to how my spine is. With my little girl who is 18 months old she was breech so there was no question that she would be a repeat c section also her heart would never be able to tolerate the medicine her heart rate when she was born was at about 220 so they wouldnt even give me pitocin to induce me. So i had 2 c sections and 2 children they were both born after 39 weeks but still little 6lbs 12oz my son and 6lbs 10 oz my daughter. I think it the induction is not necessary then it shouldnt be done. There shouldnt be any elective c sections or inductions. Now having a choice to have a repeat c section I personally think is different because there could be risks involved having a natural birth after a c section.

Denikka - posted on 07/29/2011

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The first thing I told my midwife for my second pregnancy was that I refused to be induced or have a c-section unless it turned life or death.
Both my births were natural. I was told March 24 for my first born, but I was feeling pretty done about 10 days before that, and he was born on March 17. My water broke at home (actually my first sign of labor XD) and everything went fairly smoothly. I only got a shot of morphine and even that was enough to mess with things. He ended up having some breathing problems because of the stupid morphine (that did nothing anyways XP)
My second birth was easier than my first. No morphine that time. And no one actually knows when my water broke that time XD
I've seen and heard of a lot of women who get induced or have c-sections to be able to pick their dates or to have their babies in a certain time frame. I've also seen/heard of the same with doctors. Some leaving on vacation or something so they *gotta* have the baby in a certain amount of time. I think it's ridiculous. Babies will come when they're ready, and shouldn't be forced out before unless it's absolutely, MEDICALLY necessary.
I will say that my midwife did forbid me from going into labor (with my second) until she got back from vacation....but the general agreement for prevention was just to keep our fingers and my legs crossed XD

Tanya - posted on 07/25/2011

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I was in absolutely excruciating pain at the end of my pregnancy. It was hell. But I still waited, because I wanted the best, safest birth for my baby and me. The waiting SUCKED, mostly because I had someone use a crystal to predict when my baby would be born, and it was off by 10 days! lol


I hate "due dates". There should be NO "due date". A pregnancy can last 38-42 weeks normally. It will vary depending on lots of factors that really can't be predicted. So what's up with this imaginary magical date??


When I was pregnant with my second, when people asked when I was due, I said "Well, I'll be full term the last week of April, but I'm not expecting him until the first week of May". And sure enough, that's when he was born. 41 weeks 1 day. WELL within the normal range.


I was never "overdue" with him. He wasn't "late". He was born at 41 weeks 1 day, not "over by 8 days" or "8 days late".



I think if we can change some of the language around birth, we will go a long way toward changing our society's attitudes toward it.

Merry - posted on 07/25/2011

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Just breathe April :) its ok, zach is ok!
Lol it's sad how we can get so upset at things in the past that feel like mistakes. Buyer did the best we could!
You believed your dr and he was wrong. It's not your fault and zach is just fine now :)

April - posted on 07/25/2011

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Adrienne, I had the pictocin and the cervidil, as well. I also did not experience a single contraction, nothing. i ended up with a c section and it was NOT the best. My water was never broken, everything was intact. In fact, instead of cutting me open, she could have sent me home. My son was 19 inches long and 6.0 pounds. He had clear skin and was all shriveled up like an old man. His eyes were black and looked empty. He looked like a damn preemie. I am still pissed after almost 3 years. I will never go back to that OB/GYN ever again. I am hoping for a home birth with my next child and will do everything in my power to make that happen.

Adrienne - posted on 07/22/2011

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I had a lot of hospital visit the last four weeks i was pregnant due to complications. I was inducced on my due date, buuut the pitocin didnt work, neither did the cervidil, nothing worked, i never even felt the pitocin! So a induction and a C-Section were best for me! my son was 8lbs 8.5 oz and 19" long. it all depends on the situation and the mother/child.

Rebecca - posted on 07/20/2011

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After reading this thread I am due on the 14th December and dread having a christmas day baby but I also was induced with my second and now never want to go through that again. it took 3 hours from go to whoa and I hated every second. This time I refuse to be induced unless I get to 42 weeks then maybe I will consider it

Amy - posted on 07/16/2011

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oh geeze. well, at least recovery was good for you. i don't miss those induced contractions. only a minute break! I'll bet it was almost a relief to just be done with that.

Stifler's - posted on 07/16/2011

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Dr. Graubard is crazy, he wanted to induce me at 40 weeks on the dot and the midwives refused to let him thank god. He made me get a scan and it said she was heaps big but she was smaller than Logan and I had him naturally!! I recovered better than from a natural birth to tell the truth. 10 weeks on from natural I still couldn't sit down or walk comfortably but 3 weeks later I was walking and driving and going for walks around the block with a double pram from the caesar. It was both, lack of progression and foetal distress. I didn't get a drip or epidural but they were talking about giving me a synctocin drip then decided on a caesar. The foetal distress and lack of progression I also believe was caused by the constant "just 20 more minutes on the monitor adn then you can mobilise" and then 20 minutes later it would be HMM THIS HEART BEAT ISN'T TOO GOOD I'd like you to stay on for another half an hour...



Then like 8 hours later Dr. G was like WE'RE CALLING THIS OFF AND DOING A CAESAR. It was a totally crap experience until they finally decided to do the caesar. The contractions were like 1 minute apart for hours.

Amy - posted on 07/16/2011

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Emma, my sis JUST had her baby boy. Yep. she was a week overdue. Doc wanted to induce and she said no. Next day she had him.

I was induced with my first and ended the same darn way - c section. was their reason fetal distress or lack of progression? Usually what they say. pitocin messes up baby heart rate and epidural means laying on back which slows labor. suck sucks. been there. done that.

Sorry you had to go through that, emma. :( Did you do well recovering? That's the part I hated most about my c sec. hurt to even hold my lil one right away. So glad my lil one came out vbac this time. hugs, lady.

Stifler's - posted on 07/16/2011

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I was induced at 41 weeks and 2 days or something like that. It was a god awful experience, ended in emergency caesarean.I wish Renae had just come on her own accord!

Rebecca - posted on 07/12/2011

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my first came naturally at 8 days over, but my second they kept switching between 21st May and 12th June!! They quite happily induced me at 29th May, which turned out best as she was quite big and very healthy. When encouraged she only took 3 hours to come out. I do think she would have come naturally if I had left her to bake a little longer but I'm glad I didnt as I'm not sure my body would have coped

Merry - posted on 07/12/2011

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Lol I was 9 lbs 8 oz natural home birth. And my little brother was 10lbs 6oz natural home birth :)

Jurnee - posted on 07/11/2011

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my fourth baby, estimated at over 10 lbs was actually 9lbs 12 ozs, defiitley needed the c-section I think

Constance - posted on 07/07/2011

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I agree my oldest daughter has autism and he specialist is almost 8 hrs from us. For years I was drivin 2 1/2 hrs for all my kids specialists. We will be moving in the next year and it will increase again to 2 hrs away. I prefer small town living vs. city living. So I really undestand.

Amy - posted on 07/07/2011

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it's easier to look when in a big city. more choices. some of us live middle of nowhere and very limited. i had to drive over an hour away to get one i thought was decent.

Constance - posted on 07/07/2011

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@Susanne, Finding good doctors are a process of elimination. I wouldn't give up on doctors but know tat there are good ones out there. I am very vocal so I won't except anything less than perfection. That is just me though.

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Well I think your very lucky to have good docters but not everyone is as lucky as you. Ive met a lot of docters, midwives and health visitors and can honestly say i never met any that i thought honestly cared about me or my baby. They did their job just about but they didnt do it very well.

Constance - posted on 06/25/2011

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" I never trust doctors they don't give two hoots about their patients".

I also disagree with this. My original OBs were absolutly wonderful. Even when I was 15 and pregnant they never direguarded anything I said. My kids peditrician is absolutly the best doctor I have ever used hands down for anyone including myself. He is availible 24/7 and listen to everything with open ears. Was even willing to take the same copay even though he wasn't going to receive the same amount of money from the insurance company. Ican call to speak to him directly and if it is an emergency he will immedently answer the phone if it isn't then he calls back within 30 min. We even moved out of state for a couple of years and when I started taking the kids back to him he knew ever single one of my kids and all their medical problems and surgeries and hospitalizations.
Yes their are doctors only concern about padding their wallets but most are not like that. You have to research them and you have to be comfortable with the. if you are not comfortable then it won't be a good relationship so you have to keep looking.

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Sara, I think that's awesome that you have two great doctors. I'm sure doctors that *are* good doctors hate hearing that stuff. My first doctor was the doctor that didn't care. I liked her as my gyno, but when I got pregnant she didn't seem to give a crap. She was in and out in 5 minutes and very sarcastic. I always left her office confused and upset (I even left crying a few times). Because it was my first pregnancy I thought I was stuck with her and couldn't switch OB's at that point. People that think doctors don't care are probably the ones that get doctors like her. On the flip side, my new OB was such a great doctor that he actually recommended I leave his practice and go to the birth center so that I could have the birth I wanted. I liked him so much that that decision was hard for me. I've seen both sides. I wish it was easier to find a good doctor. When I moved across the country I just had to guess and I was very wrong. Once I got to know mom's I was able to get a good recommendation.

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"I never trust docters they dont give two hoots about patients."

I want to say I highly disagree with that statement. My OBGYN and pediatrician do not fit that statement. I have both their personal cell phone numbers saved in my phone. At my 37,38 &39 week appt. my doc told me what he'd be doing each weekend...kid's ball games, Mardi Gras Ball, concert with his wife...but call him anyway if I went into labor and he would come if at all possible. I wouldn't expect him to leave his kid alone at the ball game to come deliver my baby...the on-call doc could do that...but I very much appreciated his offer. And my pediatrician has answered my phone calls on weekends and the middle of the night. And then called back a few hours later to check on us. So, please refrain from stereotyping all doctors as uncaring.

Erin - posted on 06/25/2011

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I think you should leave it alone, or if you are REALLY intent on getting labor going, do it the old fashioned way and screw like bunnies!
Your baby will come when hes ready. Of course your baby could just be stubborn, so once you hit 40 weeks, its game on.

Bevely - posted on 06/22/2011

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A lot of women now a days are being induced or getting c-sections b/c of conveinence. And it is not necessarily the mothers, but the doctors. Most docs don't want to be called out at midnight to come deliver a baby when they can schedule it for 9am on a weekday.

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