The Business of Being Born

[deleted account] ( 90 moms have responded )

Have any of you ladies watched this? I finally got to see it on Netflix last night and it's an eye opener. The statistics presented about child birth in the U.S. are frightening. It talks about lot about the c-section rate and the infant and mother mortality rate in the U.S. We have the second highest maternal death rate out of all developed countries. Also, they show how childbirth was for women in the early 1900's. Women were drugged out of their minds and tied to beds. It really is an informative documentary. Have any of you seen it? What are your thoughts? I don't have anything against giving birth in a hospital as long as you have the right hospital and doctor, but I also feel like an informed mommy is a happy mommy.

You can watch the trailor here:
http://www.thebusinessofbeingborn.com/tr...

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[deleted account]

I haven't seen it yet, but I definitely want to! I think our attitudes toward pregnant women in this country are CRAZY! Pregnancy is not a disease!

Nicole - posted on 01/04/2011

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I have started looking into being a birth doula. (Maybe a postpartum doula later.) And much of my research about these problems in the US has sent me into much frustration. One day when I was teaching my prenatal breastfeeding class, all, yes ALL, of the clients in that class were having scheduled repeat cesareans. It was a huge eye opener! I felt so sad for them all. Not only that, but I felt angry! Because one said that her doctor told her that her repeat c-section would be easier than her first and all of the research I have done says the exact opposite! So sad.

Other than women being drugged out of their minds and being tied down to their beds, most hospital births haven't changed much since the early 1900's. And with the maternal mortality and morbidity rates being so high in the US, it should be very obvious that more cesareans aren't making things better.

I can't stand the coercion that takes place when trying to get women into the operating room! I have heard some of the most awful things. Threats, lies, forced exams, etc. And then when the cesarean is over, they continue to say things like "Oh it's such a good thing we did the operation, he would have broken your pelvis", "she was seconds away from death", etc. Oy.

I am not saying that cesareans don't save lives, but many are so unnecessary and done out of convenience. They are also many times the result of the doctor/hospital in the first place. Too many women are induced when their bodies are not ready and then this keeps them tethered to an iv line and doesn't allow them much room for movement to help things along. Not to mention that the unnatural contractions that come from induction is harder on the mother and the baby (I don't know about more painful, just harder on the body). - I know, I have been induced 3 times! Only once did I go into labor on my own. Then, most physicians artificially rupture a woman's membranes to help "speed up" the process and then that gives the woman a time restraint to birth her baby. Then, many of these interventions lead to artificial pain management which again reduces a woman's ability to have more control over her labor and leaves her laboring on her back and stuck in a bed, which is actually the worst laboring and birthing positions. Then, the doctor comes in and tells her that it's her fault, by saying she is a "failure to progress" and takes her to the OR. So sad. And yet, when they are getting the woman to consent to induction or artificial rupture of her membranes, they don't tell her the risks of a cesarean are increased for doing so. This is not informed consent and that should be illegal, IMO.

Obviously, I am becoming a bit of a birth activist. LOL

Erin - posted on 01/01/2011

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I've seen it, and love it. I wholeheartedly believe in natural birth, and think the protocols and standards for maternal health care leave a lot to be desired. Inductions, IVs, Pitocin, epidurals and episiotomies should NOT be standard procedure. They all have their place, but for the love of Jeebus why can't they just leave birthing women alone and let us do our thing?!?!?



I ♥ Ricki Lake ;)

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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Just goes to show that hospitals do have a place and that sometimes interventions are necessary.



I just wish that so many doctors wouldn't assume that interventions should be used across the board. I had a healthy pregnancy and an easy labor and birth (respectively, lol, aside from the induction) and as soon as she was out the cut-happy OB had her clamped and separated from her oxygenated blood supply and whisked her away to be poked and prodded.



Hopefully things like this will become arcaic and only reserved for when it is necessary.



Which brings us back to the subject of the post, The Business of Being Born. Ricki Lake sought to normalize birth and show women that they can trust their bodies and that birth doesn't have to be a medicalized procedure in the hospital. But when the producer's baby ended up with IUGR and was only 3lb at (was it 37 weeks?) in her case a cesearean at the hospital was necessary.

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Ania - posted on 01/29/2012

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Oh wow! I think if it was me I would choose epidural instead of going under...although, who knows, maybe it's better not to be awake for that..

Sherri - posted on 01/29/2012

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Yes I am getting a tubal so I have to be put under shortly after birth to have it preformed. If I had an epidural they would do it that way but because I don't get epidurals I will need to be put under for it.

Ania - posted on 01/29/2012

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Sherri good for you! But I cannot expect my hospital to give me this type of experience that's why I'm going to birthing center. I just didn't understand your last statement, what do you mean surgery? Right after delivery? Are you ok?

Sherri - posted on 01/28/2012

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@Ania I had three hospital births with NO medication!!!! I also dictated and decided every decision that was made for myself. I would NEVER opt to not have a hospital birth, I feel it is so much safer for myself and my children. I got the exact experience I wanted for everyone of my births.



I am due to give birth in 3wks and will be going to the hospital again. I also plan on no medication again. However, due to not having an epidural I will have to be put under shortly after I deliver for surgery.

Ania - posted on 01/28/2012

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Ok then. maybe I used bad phrase when I said about playing into your dr's wishes, but you have to realize that you wanted the experience that dr can provide you with, It is even better for hom to have full controlover what is going on with you during labor. Me on the other hand I want the simples possible experience, because I can have it do to my low risk and other things bla bla, simply personal choice and my dr assured me that i will not have to have anything done that I didn't want and I made sure to talk about those issues with all the drs in her practice. When I got to the hospital it turned out I have nothing to say. That is why this time around I chose midwife and birthing center, because these providers will make sure that my experience is exactly what I want. I was just naive going to the dr. There is also an issue of Manhattan obgyns being sued a lot hence their opposition to natural birth. I should have thought about that before I went to my obgyn.

I'm definately not looking down on you at all. If my labor was longer I would probably beg for epidural and I believe it would also help the experience, but I didn't need it so why I had to be exposed to all the traditional medicated procedures? Just in case?

Jenna - posted on 01/28/2012

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I'm just surprised at all these bad experiences, since I haven't seen any of what has been talked about on here and have given birth multiple times in different hospitals with different doctors, so I guess I just don't think that all doctors are out there to steal your money and convince you to do something you don't want to do. If a woman wants to give birth in her home without medication, more power to her. I don't know how you thought I was "looking down" when I was simply refuting the notion on here that birthing has gotten worse instead of better. I know midwives today aren't like that of 19th century, but that's because of modern medicine, not because of anything else. And I think you sound more like you're "looking down" on me when you say that I "played right into my doctor's wishes." How you can even say that is beyond me! Not one of my doctors expressed an opinion on how they wanted me to give birth, it was all completely up to me. In every case, they sat there with their pad of paper and asked me how I wanted to give birth, what my birth plan was, and I told them.



And I have researched natural childbirth at home as I considered it for my third child because that's what "everyone else was doing" and they made it sound like I had made a bad choice with my first two having them in a hospital. After much reading and research and talking with others, I decided that it simply wasn't for me. That doesn't make me a sucker for "playing right into my doctor's wishes" and that doesn't make me hateful of those who choose it as their path either. It just makes me an educated mother who chose a different direction and still had good experiences.

Ania - posted on 01/28/2012

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Jenna with all do respect if you chose medicated hospital birth you played right into your dr wishes and that is fine. It is your choice. Thank god we don't live in 19century and midwives now are educated and they wash their hands. You should look more into natural childbirth without drugs and how nature intended it and then state opinions. From your post I got the impression that you are looking down on women who want natural experience

Jenna - posted on 01/27/2012

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I guess I'm one of the few women in this country who gave birth in a hospital with an epidural and had a beautiful experience. Reading all your horror stories makes me wonder how you ended up having such a bad time of it. My five birth experiences also were in four different hospitals with four different doctors and a slew of different nurses in three different states. I happen to think too that the doctor makes more difference than the hospital does. I have really liked all my ob/gyns, but most especially the one I have currently. She is just great. My doctors have all respected the fact that I'm well-educated on matters of childbirth probably because I've respected their training right back.



I just feel lucky that I am alive in this era rather than in the mid 19th century because I've done quite a bit of reading on mid 19th century midwifery and the conditions for giving birth were quite slovenly. Midwives didn't even wash their hands because they didn't know much about germs or think that germs had anything to do with childbearing and many women died of childbed fever and other complications which modern medicine prevent and help. Also, we are free to talk about pregnancy and childbirth just about anywhere among any company these days and back then, it was completely taboo and off-limits and women were confined to their homes once they were showing.

Ania - posted on 01/26/2012

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Great movie. Ive seen it right when I got pregnant with the first baby. I carefully analyzed parts where they talked about interventions and birthing positions. It is really amazing. Dr Moritz from the movie - emergency dr for one of the characters is my dr now. I work with his midwives and I'm so calm about my future experience of the second birth. My first dr...well she second everything I mentioned from the movie and told me that all these interventions won't be necesarry at all because I'm young and very low risk. When labor started and I have to admit it was easy...6h only one or 2 in excruciating pain...I didn't want an epidural. All they wanted to do to me is to hook me up to things for no reason at all. I really wanted to push in the upright position - pelvis is open in that position and I really could not do it on my back. I felt that I could not breathe under the weight of my big belly, but nobody listened to me. I needed oxygen, babies HR started deopping and after 20 min of pushing when I was on the verge of passing out they used vaccum. Then nobody gave me the baby right away. I progressively got angrier and angrier with this birth experience and then I watched movie again and agin and was even angrier at myself for not being rude...and more precise. I will never let this happen again

[deleted account]

Just finished watching the movie and loved it! Now I just need to convince these twins to start turning head down so I can have a "normal" birth!

Nicole - posted on 01/08/2011

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Awww thanks ladies. He was posterior, so I think that was the reason for the need to be on all fours and the bruising that Marcus suffered.

Minnie - posted on 01/08/2011

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Nicole that is absolutely HORRIBLE that they would ignore your need to birth how you were most comfortable! So sad how dehumanizing many hosptials and doctors are to birthing mothers. :(.



I get yelled at for my opinion of doctors and hospitals but I have a reason for that opinion. I'm not pulling it out of the air!

[deleted account]

How aweful, Nicole. I've already asked my doctor if I can push in whatever way I feel comfortable and he's all for it. I'm so in love with this doctor lol. When I told him I saw this movie and wanted to talk to him about it, he listened to all of my concerns. He also said that there's a birthing center right behind the hospital that has great midwives. He said he fully supports me going there if I feel more comfortable. I *really* like him though and I'm afraid if I switch I may get someone I'm not as comfortable with. It was just so interesting to me that he gave me the information and the support.

Nicole - posted on 01/08/2011

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That is true Lisa! And sadly, most hospitals and OBs would NEVER allow a mother to flip when the baby's head is delivered. Much less, even let her attempt to deliver in that position in the first place. Most would much rather dislocate the shoulders because they are not comfortable. And then if the woman has had an epidural, it's impossible for her to deliver in any position other than lying on her back.

When I was delivering Marcus, after laboring on all fours the whole time, I literally cried when I had to lay back so they could confirm that I was fully dilated and then had to stay that way until the OB arrived (several contractions later) and begged to deliver on all fours, but was told that it was "against hospital policy". I was in tears, because my body was writhing! It was just telling me to be in a better position. So, it was no surprise that he had damaged blood vessels in his eyes, blackened eyes, bruised forehead and chin and severe jaundice due to all of that bruising.

Minnie - posted on 01/08/2011

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Sometimes a simple change in position flipping from back to all fours is enough to open the pelvic outlet by just a few millimeters and unstick that baby.

[deleted account]

Ugh, I wish I still lived in my hometown. I would be treated like a queen in my mom's hospital. lol. I would even get the big room :). Stupid husband's job...

[deleted account]

My mom is the same way for me. She's been an OB nurse for 30 years now. She runs her department at my hometown hospital. She's seen both sides, but will always lobby for mom to have what the mom wants. She's definitely for natural birth. She was the one who called the nursery after they stole my baby for 4 hours because her temperture was 2 tenths of a degree "too low." She told them bring that baby here and put her skin-to-skin with her momma! This is the main reason why this next baby is not going to the nursery at all unless there is a medical issue.

Nicole - posted on 01/06/2011

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That is one awesome red-headed Mommy!!! My husband was always that person for me. When my fourth was born and he had low-blood sugar and I was handling it just fine, he chimes in with "She doesn't *have* to give him formula and she's already refused it! She also doesn't have to give you any explanation for refusing the formula, either. No formula! End of conversation! Now, leave my wife and my baby alone and find something better to do with your time!" Pretty much word for word! LOL I have to say, looking back, he's awesome, but I got mad at him at the time for interrupting me while I was *dealing* with the situation myself. ha ha

Kate CP - posted on 01/06/2011

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My mom is my advocate every time I go to the hospital. She's fired doctors for me, kicked nurses out who couldn't get a simple line in, and argued for me when I couldn't. I love my red-headed mommy. :)

She and I already have talked about everything that I want and don't want and she knows my birth plan. She was awesome with my first birth and I plan on having her there for this one, too. We plan on staying home as long as possible before going to the hospital.

Sally - posted on 01/06/2011

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The later you go to the hospital, the less they can do to you. :)
Doulas are wonderful, but they can't tell the hospital staff anything. They can only translate medical speak and make sure you know your options. You are still the one who has to say no.
Assigning your husband to protective duty can work well--if he is willing. With our first, mine was even more afraid of the doctors than I was. I didn't realize how badly he felt about not protecting us then until my second delivery.
Even just being informed and aware can help a lot. The most valuable thing I learned between children was YOU CAN ALWAYS SAY NO. And when the stupid resident tried to physically put me on my back (my second came too fast for the midwife to get to the hospital), I said NO. When she didn't listen, my husband gently moved her away. The nurses did much more than she did. It was funny to have her lecturing us after the delivery and be completely ignored. I kind of felt sorry for the poor shell shocked intern in the corner though. I didn't even realize he was in the room until it was all over, but it is good for him to see that mommy should be in charge when babies are falling out.
Good luck

Amy - posted on 01/06/2011

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oh kate. Let me tell you what a midwife online told me. Wait in the lobby until you're feeling like you need to push. THEN check in to deliver. She said you would be monitored less and less likely for them to talk you into a c section, yet if one is seriously needed, you will be right there at the hospital.

Nicole - posted on 01/06/2011

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Yes, a doula sounds perfect!!!

At least you are entering this with education. That goes a LONG way when trying to have the birth you want. Remember that there is usually an intervention domino effect and when you do one, many are usually to follow. I will send good birth vibes your way!

Minnie - posted on 01/06/2011

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At least you can go into your birth with your knowledge, Kate. Sometimes it helps to really sift through their reasoning for a c-section...and avoid the interventions if possible that can lead to the c-section. I know that can be rough to try to think about all that and advocate for yourself in the thick of labor.

Would a doula be helpful to you? Someone to advocate for you so you don't have to do the reasoning and fighting yourself?

Kate CP - posted on 01/06/2011

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*banging head on table* I just found out the hospital I'm due to deliver at has one of the highest c-section rates in my city. Fuck.

Nicole - posted on 01/06/2011

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I agree that medicine has it's place in the delivery of a child. It's just that most use the same techniques for healthy, low-risk pregnancies as they do for complicated, high-risk ones. Too much medicine in a healthy birth and delivery can actually make a complicated birth and delivery. So, with the current perception of birth in this country, we are creating our own problems most of the time.

I am a birth advocate. This means that I want every woman to have the birth she deserves. If that's with no interventions because she doesn't need them, to having an operating room available should complications arise. And she should have all of the information to make the best decision for her and her baby. It's just all about empowerment!

I am appalled that my state has the second highest cesarean rate in the US and us in the top 2 are still at least 3% higher than the next leading state! And it's how we are treating pregnant women that has gotten us there. I believe from hearing the stories and experiences that happened to me, that we are getting these rates from unjust medical practices. I would like to see that rate drop to the goals.

Now, in South Africa the rate of cesareans is at like 70% in private hospitals. I don't know much about giving birth in South Africa, but I would have to assume that rate is so high because women only go to hospitals to birth their babies if there is complications. Otherwise, they deliver at home. Am I correct in that thinking? I hope I am not derailing the debate too far, but I am curious of other thoughts...

Sally - posted on 01/05/2011

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If you're not pumped full of contraction enhancing drugs or forced into uncomfortable positions or expected to labor and push on the doctor's schedule AND your prenatal class actually teaches you real coping techniques instead of what is convenient for the hospital--labor hurts A LOT less.
The hospital made almost every minute of my first labor an excrutiating ordeal. Then used that to scare me into an epidural that almost got us a c-section. Then they felt a need to torture my baby for 45 minutes before I was allowed to see her or either of us were allowed to touch or talk to her. When they finally handed her over, she was dazed, having trouble seeing, and didn't want to eat or sleep.
With my second baby, my midwife gave me real info and personal power and we got to the hospital too late for "procedure" to do anything to us. That one hurt less during contractions than the first did during the breaks. She actually had a complication that kept her out of my arms for about 45 minutes also, but my husband was touching her the entire time and both of us were encouraged to talk to her and she hadn't been drugged out of her mind or had her eyes screwed up when I did get her. She nursed and slept a lot better her first two weeks than big sis did and I completely credit the different techniques for that.

Kate CP - posted on 01/05/2011

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I'm doing some research now and it looks like cutting the cord early is actually safer for babies who's moms have GD. It decreases the chance of clotting disorder and jaundice. :/

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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I think you definitely are, Sherri. I do understand that hospitals are all different. I was at St. Joseph in Nashua.

I hope that you are able to have a peaceful comfortable birth, Kate! It's no fun stressing about that! Is your OB open to some dialogue at all?

Sherri - posted on 01/05/2011

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My last was induced four days overdue but my OB doesn't let you go more then 5 days overdue ever. I am okay with this though. I also was okay with my husband cutting the cord as soon as they were born. They all were placed immediately on my chest and left there until the placenta was delivered with all of them, all they did was a quick suction of their nose and mouth with the bulb sucker. None had anything placed in their eyes or anything else. The only one this didn't occur for was my first but he was very ill at birth and wisked immediately away because he was non reactive and would have died without immediate intervention I didn't even get to see him for the first 4hrs. He was also 3 1/2 wks early.

I was left alone for almost all of my laboring process they would quietly just come in and randomly check the heart rate and contractions and then I let them know when I was ready to push. They came in, did a quick check and then I started pushing.

I guess I was really lucky that I didn't have many of the experiences, that some of you have had.

Kate CP - posted on 01/05/2011

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"Kate- why does your OB want to cut the cord immediately because of GD? And late-term ultrasounds to determine size...it is widely known that they are not accurate.

It always bothers me about that immediate cord-clamping. It's for no one's convenience but the doctor's and nurses'. Fewer babies would need resuscitative efforts if they were allowed to remain attached to the placenta and receive oxygen while beginning to breathe."

I know, I know! I think he's afraid that the baby will get more of my blood which is insulin deficient and have a hard time regulating his own glucose levels? He also said he doesn't want the baby to get cold. Well...if he's on ME and wrapped in a blanket he won't GET cold. I'm really starting to worry about my next birth now. But it's so close (I'm due on February 13th but I just KNOW he's coming early) AND I'm high risk so I don't really think I have time to switch to another provider. Not to mention my husband HATES the idea of a birth outside of a hospital. He actually gets angry and irate with me about it.

Not fair.

[deleted account]

That's a wonderful birth story, Lisa, but I can't stop laughing about your husband ordering Alien on Netflix!! LMAO ;-)

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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Just for comparison, here is my second birth:



I woke up to light and widely-spaced contractions at 3 am, and sat around interspersed by bathroom trips. Hubby thought he would be funny and decided to put Alien on netflix. Sat around some more, rocking leaning over the ottoman.... 8:00am midwife arrives and we fill the pool. I get in pool and wallow around for four hours...humming my birthing song, doing my mental imagery and such. I think I hit transition here at some point but I didn't notice I was so comfy. Oh! Here comes baby! I get up on my knees and push her out into my hands and lift her to the air and my chest by myself. No one else touches her, no one else puts their scent on her or rubs the amniotic fluid and vernix off of her. No one sticks things in her mouth, puts goop in her eyes or gives her shots. Up she goes to my breasts and nuzzles her way there by herself. We clamber into bed. Bliss.



Midwife weighs baby three hours later and looks her over and leaves.

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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Oh, and the pushing on demand!!! I did that with so much force because of pressure from the staff with baby #1 (because I was being threatened with a cesarean) that I finally pushed so hard that I had 3 major internal tears. It took at least 6 weeks for them to heal! That's one of my biggest pet peeves about hospital births, they tell you when and how hard to push instead of letting you follow your body. I have refused to push on demand ever since that birth and my babies only got bigger and yet I never tore again. Even from the scar tissue from the original tears which each new OB told me could happen.

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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Sherri, hospitals are fine for any who want them, but I was induced 3 times unnecessarily. First time was due to the idea that the baby was going to be large. He was, but I delivered him just fine even though I postponed the induction by another week against the advice of my OB because I was scared of the induction and scared to deliver that early. The next time I was induced was because I was a week and day overdue, but I tested fine on a non-stress test just the day before, so we could have waited. The last time was with the last baby and I was given pitocin because my contractions were "irregular", but I was 5 cm dilated, so I was progressing just fine, if you ask me. I really should have just said "no, let me just go back home and I will come back when I am ready. Give me whatever waivers you want me to sign." Not only the inductions, but each time my membranes were artificially ruptured which made the inductions even more difficult to handle. Actually, with the fourth, the on-call OB came in at least 4 times throughout that little 2 hours bugging me to break my water because I didn't want them to. I finally gave in and I think that's why he wasn't able to turn from the posterior position. I think that had my membranes been left intact, he would have had the ability to turn and delivery would have been easier for both he and I. With my first, they broke my water so early that I went through another 17 hours of labor and I was controlling the pain fine until my membranes were ruptured, but after and with 17 hours to go, I asked for any pain control they would give me! And that's just a start....

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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There isn't anything wrong with birthing in the hospital, Sherri. You need to be where you are most comfortable and for many mothers that is the hospital.



For me, personally, birthing in the hospital does not make me comfortable.



My first labor and birth was a big snowball of interventions. I was induced a day before my due date...the nurse decided she didn't like my BP, but it was normal for full-term. So they did an ultrasound and the OB decided my fluid level was low (levels fluctuate throughout the day and can be low if the mother is dehydrated). Well, my OB is a mother and likes babies born during the day, M-F...so she played the "your baby could DIE" card on me and I believed her. She said "Oh, we'll just stick this little prostaglandin pill in your cervix to make you dilate." Little did I know that this was cytotec. A drug for ulcers and warned against use for inductions by the FDA. She did not inform me of the risks (maternal and fetal death due to strong contractions that can rupture the uterus and deprive the baby of oxygen). I was stuck in bed with the belts across my belly battling the cytotec contractions...had an epidural...nubain, which erased half of my memories of the birth, and nearly an emergency c-section because my daughter's heart tones were all over the place.



One nurse blew my vein on the way in with the IV, another blew the vein on the way out. When I felt the need to push the nurses chuckled at me and said that I couldn't be fully dilated. The vaginal exams...the being told I couldn't push yet because my OB wasn't there yet (what- were we going to explode or something if I pushed her out when I wanted to?), on my back with my rear in the air "Hold your breath push for ten!" Resulted in a nice tear because I wasn't allowed to push as I felt and to relax as she was coming out. The lights in my face, strangers staring at me from every corner, refusing my request to keep the door closed because my rear was facing it...



Nurses following me to the bathroom and threatening to catheterize me if I didn't pee when they wanted me to pee....being woken up every half hour during the night for BP and temperature checks, trying to teach me how to breastfeed by shoving my baby on my breast and being clueless as to why I developed blisters...



Yah, I got a chip on my shoulder.

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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Alexis, I second Lisa's comment. I know that my pain level with each of my four labors and deliveries had a lot to do with how comfortable I was with my environment and also depended on what interventions were going on at the time. I was most comfortable with my surroundings in my labor with baby number 2 and I only started to feel at all uncomfortable was when I was already at 7 cm and that was because I was transitioning. He was also the easiest of my deliveries, too. I felt like I had so much control over my body and my pain. I did give birth in a hospital that time, but my OB at that time was a wonderful woman from South Africa who was so cool about how she treated her patients and the way she worked obviously rubbed off on the staff she was working with because I delivered at that same hospital another time and my experience was completely different. With my fourth labor, I was doing so good that I didn't even realize that I was in labor. I just went in for a regular OB appointment and she realized that I was in labor and that's where things went downhill because she admitted in the hopsital. Although, I was only in the hospital laboring for about 2 hours before giving birth, it was a rough two hours. Now, I know that he was posterior and that would have made it more difficult, but I was fine until admitted in the hospital. Heck, so fine, I had already done a million things that morning while laboring and not even realized it. lol I really wish I had somehow not made that OB appointment. Ha ha

Sherri - posted on 01/05/2011

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I think this is great for some. I think I am a little old school. Although I had an amazing experience, had a great hospital an amazing OB. I am opposed to midwives for me they are just not my cup of tea. I want to only give birth in a hospital, laying in a bed, with an OB/GYN and all my family and friends around me. I want the security of medical intervention around me. Although I loved the outcome of my pregnancies and labor. The actual labor there was nothing to love for me. It was something I had to do it was not pleasurable, the pain sucked and I was ever so glad it was just over. The miracle; that I created that little being wonderful but the rest of it I really could have lived without.
Do I opt for medical interventions when needed I do. I do not think that C-Sections should ever be given unless medically necessary. But other than C-Sections I don't see what interventions the hospital gave to me that were unnecessary.
Can some of you give examples of medical interventions that you felt were given but done unnecessarily?

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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Epidurals aren't compatible with homebirth, Alexis. If you wanted an epidural and a midwife still you could birth in a hospital with a certified nurse-midwife.

Perception of pain and how one deals with the pain has a lot to do with mindset and how secure and comfortable you feel in your birth surroundings.

I personally found the book Birthing From Within very helpful. There are a lot of pain control techniques for the mind. I also found self-hypnosis helpful as well. Many women find that laboring in a tub really helps with the pressure of contractions.

Alexis - posted on 01/05/2011

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OMG I know. I told my husband I wanted to get a midwife next time. I had a horrible experiance with the hospital the first time anyways, they misdiagnosed me with prenatal diabetes and started me on insulin when the doctor came and said they read the blood report wrong. They also got my name wrong when I went in to give birth and had to do all the blood work again. The only thing I am scared about with giving birth at home with a midwife is the pain. I loved the epidural. Anyway to combine midwife and epidural?

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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I completely agree Lisa! Medicine during pregnancy should be for emergencies, not because pregnancy itself is a medical emergency.

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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I know. What do they think that blood is for? That blood is the baby's!



They would be surprised that you can simply leave it attached until it dries up. No clamping needed.



Kate- why does your OB want to cut the cord immediately because of GD? And late-term ultrasounds to determine size...it is widely known that they are not accurate.



It always bothers me about that immediate cord-clamping. It's for no one's convenience but the doctor's and nurses'. Fewer babies would need resuscitative efforts if they were allowed to remain attached to the placenta and receive oxygen while beginning to breathe.

Kate CP - posted on 01/05/2011

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My doctor wants to cut the cord within a minute of birth because I have GD. I'm pissed about it but...I dunno. I really like my OBGYN but he's been doing some things recently that have really been pissing me off. Like weekly ultrasounds just because I have mild (and boy do I mean MILD) GD. I barely failed (went over by 15 points) my GTT and he's wanting to check me every week for placenta quality and baby size. So last week was my first ultrasound of many and guess what? This baby is probably going to be SMALLER than my daughter was when I DIDN'T have GD. *sigh*

If this asshole thinks I'm being induced he's in for a shock.

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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Ha ha Lisa! I've seen the faces of docs when even asked if they could just simply wait until the cord stops pulsing before they cut it. LOL I couldn't imagine what their face would look like if asked not to cut the cord at all. I think they'd probably faint! And then swear that the cord is only going to send toxic blood back through it to the baby, or something equally ridiculous.

Nicole - posted on 01/05/2011

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I'm sorry Julianne. With my last baby, he was posterior and the only way that I could get relief during contractions was to labor on my hands and knees. Luckily, no one gave me crap about it, but when it was time to deliver, obviously, I couldn't deliver that way. Even though, that was all that my body was telling me to do. I didn't have to have a cesarean (thank goodness), but he ended up getting beat up pretty badly as I was pushing his poor little face over my pubic bone. He had hyperbillirubin problems and had to be hospitalized and I truly feel that had I been able to deliver in the position I wanted, he would have had such better delivery.

Minnie - posted on 01/05/2011

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Well now Nicole, doncha know that all those policies are NECESSARY?



Your body is not made for birthing- you are medical mayhem waiting to happen. And that is why we have OBGYNs and L & D nurses to save you and your baby from the chaos that is your contracting uterus. Thank GOD that we can suction newborns' toes out of their mouths or they will NEVER be able to breathe on their own! And gasp!- the ubilical cord! That sinuous cord of danger leading to the encroaching destruction that is the- placenta! Cut them off! Free the babies from their impending doom!

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i was forced to lay on my back when i was fighting to stand and move because i could feel the baby was the wrong way, they made me push anyways and i ended up with an emergency section. thats just one stress of my labor, i have a long list of shit they did...i hate hospitals now..

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