Vaccines DO NOT Cause Autism

Jackie - posted on 06/08/2010 ( 76 moms have responded )

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http://www.parenting.com/article/Baby/He...

The End of the Autism/Vaccine Debate?
Medical experts hope the retraction of the 1998 study that scared parents and started the controversy will finally help people feel at peace with immunizations


On playgrounds and at playdates, it's hard to have a conversation about childhood immunizations without the word autism popping up. In fact, a recent study published in the journal Pediatrics showed that one in four parents is concerned that vaccines can cause autism. It's no wonder when the Internet and television airwaves are full of personal stories that raise a question about the link. But the study that started the autism vaccine scare was recently retracted by the prestigious journal that published it 12 years ago, and the lead researcher had his medical license pulled. Given these developments, some experts hope we have finally reached the end of the debate.

The Backstory

In 1998, a British gastroenterologist, Andrew Wakefield, M.D. and his colleagues published a paper in the British medical journal The Lancet suggesting that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine might cause symptoms associated with autism. "Wakefield had a case study of eight children who had received the MMR and then developed symptoms of autism," says Paul Offit, MD, chief of infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "He also believed they had abnormal intestinal tracts and proposed a syndrome -- linking intestinal inflammation from receiving the MMR with the development of autism."

Though Wakefield acknowledged in the paper that "he could not say whether the MMR caused autism," says Dr. Offit, "it opened the door for the notion that a vaccine could cause autism. It was the Royal Free Hospital, an excellent hospital in London, it was published in the oldest medical journal, and it was off to the races." In England, thousands of parents refused to vaccinate their children, resulting in hundreds of hospitalizations and three deaths in Ireland from measles.


I personally let my daughter have every vaccine they wanted to give her on time. I figured the doctors knew better than I. I also would rather my daughter be protected from the kids that went UN-vaccinated because parents refused the very immunizations that have saved millions and the same immuniztions that we take for granted simply because most of our generation has never seen what Polio can do to somebody first hand. Or whooping cough or measles and mumps. I wouldn't be able to live with myself if my daughter had come down with anything like that and I could have prevented it. On the other hand, I don't know what it like to play the other side of the fence. Im just speaking fro my personal opinion.

I know that this can get heated so lets play nice ladies. I'm just curious if you did or did not get the vaccines due to the Autism link. If you didn't will you change your minds now or do you have other reasons?

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Stephany - posted on 06/09/2010

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Both of my boys are up-to-date on vaccines and I will always choose to have them vaccinated. I did have them administered on a delayed schedule just because my oldest had an allergic reaction to one when he was an infant (we didn't yet know that he's allergic to eggs), so if he has another reaction I want to know what he's reacting to.
I deal with autism day in and day out. My oldest has a confirmed diagnosis, we're waiting on confirmation for my youngest, and it has become our new normal. These kids aren't dying! They aren't contagious, and they aren't diseased. They have a neurological disorder which we think of not as a disability but as a learning style. They learn thing differently than most everyone else, but they still live. We still take them to the zoo and to the park and to restaurants and to parties. People see my oldest and are amazed with his progress- he used to run from people, and now he introduces himself and asks how their day was. He used to hide from me, and now he seeks me out to hug me and tell me he loves me. He is a completely different kid than he once was BECAUSE I BELIEVED HE COULD BE. What I'm trying to say is this: autism is has some really terrible drawbacks, but it is something you can work with. You can't reason with measles or polio- you can't change those facts. Knowing what I know, living what I have lived, and looking at what I look at each day, I'd choose autism over any of the potential risks of not vaccinating every single day of the week.

Julia - posted on 06/15/2010

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Erin...I seriously choked on my coffee when I read your post...

"Vaccines are relatively new and there are no long term studies that have satisfied my inquisitions on the effects of them on our developing children"

seriously? I'm glad you did research. However I have had all of my vaccinations and I'm 30...my oldest brother has had all of his vaccinations and he is 43. So tell me HOW are vaccinations relatively new? Ok I will give you the HPV vaccine and the Chicken pox vaccine. However how can you consider any of these new vaccines?

Polio Vaccine - Developed 1952
Measles - introduced 1963
Mumps - used since 1949
rubella - licensed in 1969
Pertussis - developed 1930's
diptheria - first used in the US in 1891
Tetanus - developed in 1924
MMR - has been used since 1971

http://www.vaccineinformation.org/

I could keep going but I decided to stop, granted this is a PRO Vaccination site but you can't seriously sit here and tell me that these vaccinations are new and haven't been tested long term. Only one was developed after my brother was born. And that was still 41 years ago.

For anyone who thinks there is a link between the rise of the rate of autism and vaccinations...ever think of this...more people are not vaccinating their children and the rate is still going up. Also the spectrum of autism has gotten a lot bigger...so more kids who had symptoms of it before but were not considered autistic are now being diagnosed with it because we have MORE science to back it up.

Stephany - posted on 06/15/2010

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There are toxins everywhere, in almost everything. Sorry to burst anybody's bubble, but that's just the truth. Has your kid ever gotten ahold of a sugar-free food product or drink? Guess what- those sugar substitutes turn into fermaldehyde once ingested. Has your kid ever eaten ANY processed food? Those chemicals would make you blush. How about this- has your kid ever come in contact with a piece of plastic, or a red candy, or an unwashed piece of non-organic produce? Toxins and chemicals are everywhere!! I'm not saying that vaccines are the safest, best things we can do for our kids. There are some gross ingredients and I don't like the fact that some kids get 4 injections at one appointment. HOWEVER, they are a necessary evil.
(This is generally speaking, to those parents who choose to not vaccinate their child, and not directed to any one individual): What are you going to tell your child if and when they want to travel outside the safety of your country? What if they tell you they want to go to Africa for a year, or they want to join the Peace Corp and are assigned to a third world country? 'Gee, I had the chance to vaccinate you against illnesses that are rampant and deadly where you are going, but I decided that your own immune system was certainly strong enough to fight off these illnesses that are killing other people by the masses.' Are you going to ask them to get the injections before they leave, or maybe they could wait until they are there and they could stand in line for 3 days with the locals for the injections they could have gotten as an infant. Maybe they can see the FEAR and WORRY in the mother's eyes as she counts the people ahead of her, hoping that her kids are lucky enough to get poked because she KNOWS all too well the consequences of being unvaccinated. What if they never leave the country but, because of all of the parents not vaccinating their kids, there is an outbreak here? Will you rush them to the doctor when the wall of security you have relied on (all the other parents willing to vaccinate their kids) starts to look a little less secure? What if your kid got sick and infected a baby too young to get their vaccinations? How would you explain your decision to that mother?
Kids don't just get a neurological disorder from a shot or two. Know why so many people think their kid "got" autism from their vaccinations? Because most kids' symptoms aren't overly apparent until around an year or a year and a half. If a parent notices any symptoms before then, most people tell them not to worry "every baby is different", "he's working on other skills, so he's too busy to worry about looking at you", "some kids are picky eaters", "he doesn't want to be held because he's independent", etc. Case in point: I met a mom who swore her son got autism from his 12 month vaccinations. I asked her if he had any symptoms before then. She said no. I asked if he had eaten well, been cuddly, etc. She said "Well, he never slept well when we held him, and he only liked one solid food, and he prefered to be crawling around on his own over me hugging on him. He was always been very independent. He didn't talk at all, but that's pretty common. He didn't talk after his shots, and most one year olds whould be able to talk. That means he got autism from his vaccines." Are you kidding me?! He had the symptoms before but they weren't apparent until after the shots because of his age, not the shots themselves. This is, quite often, the situation. You tell a parent their kid has a condition that they will have the rest of their lives, that nobody knows what causes it and there is no known cure, and the social stigma surrounding it is one of pity and disgrace, and along comes a few people with medical degrees saying they know the cause and cure: vaccinations are bad, not vaccinating will keep your kid safe. Who wouldn't want to believe that?! Unfortunately they were wrong, the science was never there to support their hypothesis, and now there are a ton of parents who are afraid to vaccinate their kids (and more and more are being diagnosed with autism in spite of this trend). Ever heard of a perfect storm?

Rosie - posted on 06/10/2010

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everybody i know of that had the chickenpox (except for me) had it bad. pox down their throat, in their eyelids, all over everywhere. they could barely breathe. i got it twice, and luckily each time it wasn't bad, but it was bad enough for me to never want my children to get it.
i have recently had my oldest child tested for autism/aspergers, and after waiting for 4 months for his appointment, they couldn't make a diagnosis so we have to see someone else-in another 4 months (no waiting for medical care my ass, i bet if i went to canada he'd of been checked out by now, sigh) . anyhoo what they did tell me is that they are leaning towards pervasive developmental disorder-which includes autism. i'm much like stephany as even if it did cause this for my son, i would much rather have him here than dead. there is no comparison, and i don't understand how anybody can not only endanger their childs live, but risk other peoples childrens lives because of this mans ignorance, and gross mishandling of this study. he makes me want to puke. grr.

Krista - posted on 06/09/2010

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I believe in vaccinations, but I don't think the retraction of the study will do anything to persuade those who are firmly entrenched in the idea that vaccines are dangerous. That toothpaste is already well out of the tube, and won't be going back in.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

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Jane - posted on 07/12/2011

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Folks who believe that vaccines cause autism will not willingly give up their belief. So the researcher lost his license - that can be interpreted as the evil drug companies persecuting him. Besides if you let go of the idea that vaccines cause autism, then you are back at not knowing what caused it and losing any slight control you felt you had over the situation.

Personally, I believe that vaccines are a marvelous invention, one that has allowed millions of children to grow to healthy adulthood.

Susan - posted on 07/12/2011

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so I know this is an old post but I'm adding my 2 cents I have 3 with autism my 3 year old never got a shot but still have autism but he is my high functioning one... my oldest got high fevers with all the shots every single one... I'm sure it's because he had autism first and even Dr. Sears still says if your child has autism your should stop the shots.

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Chicken pox can be fatal. It usually isn't but ask yourself, if you can prevent a very unpleasant and potentially fatal disease, why not? Shingles vax too! I have seen friends suffer horribly from shingles. One poor family friend had them on her scalp so she was unable to even wash her hair from the pain. My mother is saving up the money to get her shingles vax and I'm encouraging my father to do the same.

Once again, I ask. There are so so so many disease we cannot cure and cannot effectively prevent. Why not prevent the ones we can?

Measles is the big one. There was a reason people with it were quaranteened. It was contagious and deadly.

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Vaccines save lives. They prevent death and permanent disability. I will never forget a lady in my church growing up who was crippled by polio. Had anyone told her that only poor hygiene caused polio, she would have hit them with her cane!

I had whooping cough 4 years ago. My then husband's grandmother became hysterical when she found out as she saw many children die of whooping cough while she was in a German concentration camp.

My mother almost died of measles as a child.

I will take every risk and give my child every vaccine. I would like to know what the insane (and I'll happily call them that) anti-vaxers answer is to why diseases like measles and mumps are making such a strong comeback among communities where vaccinations have dropped?

My goodness, there are so many diseases out there that we CANNOT prevent, why do people want to stop us from preventing the ones we can?

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Thanks Meghan I did a little research and yes autism is usually detected around the age of 2 but milder forms can be detected much later. I was just curious as to when the baby was diagnosed because it sounded like it was soon after the jabs, but I may have understood it wrongly lol! Yeah generally it's noticed when they should be starting to talk and interacting with other children. My husband's brother who's 18 has severe autism - it's such a shame because he seems like a really nice person but due to the autism he doesn't have any friends.

Meghan - posted on 06/19/2010

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I should add though I have heard of quite a few diagnosis BEFORE 18 months...I am just speaking on the averages I have read about!!

Meghan - posted on 06/19/2010

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Autism can be diagnosed as early as 18 months.There is a core group of signs that doctors use to diagnose and unfortunatly most of them are NORMAL issues for a toddler development such as, impaired ability to make friends with peers, impaired ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others, absence or impairment of imaginative and social play, preoccupation with certain objects or subjects etc...
My nephew was diagnosed around 2 1/2 or 3 years old-his is a severe case...maybe milder forms can go un noticed until 6 or 7 but that seems VERY late to me.

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Jonie when was she diagnosed with autism? As far as I was aware autism can't be diagnosed until a child is around the age of 6 or 7.

Jonie - posted on 06/18/2010

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my kids are vaccinated also.However my cousins baby had some kinda shot(truly not sure but it was a baby shot) 2 days later she started having infantile seizures and was then diagnosed with autism so Im nopt sure what i think In away i do think whatever shot she had caused that (she was the most alert brightest babies ever..and 2 to 3 days later. you would be shocked to have seen this little baby girl) but in all honesty. Im unsure of what I think...maybe -maybe not--- In my opinion you run a big risk in getting the shots or not getting them..but like i said my kids are vaccinated and they are 4 10 and 12 -

Julia - posted on 06/15/2010

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Did I ever once try to push my opinion on you? No, what I did was comment on what you said and debunked it.
Then you go and start saying shit like

"I know it may seem shocking that some that people do their own research and not follow their physician blindly when it comes to vaccination."

Giving the impression that I do NOT do my own research or that I follow my doctor's opinion blindly. Rest assured I do not.

or

"are you also paid by the pharmaceudical companies? Interesting"

Nope once again way off your mark. Like I said I was just an MI Soldier (by the way my job in the army was research so I think I've done my fair share of it) and a stay at home mom to 3 kids trying to get my degree to be a phys ed teacher.

Didn't your mother ever teach you to think before you speak? Maybe next time you should try it.

Julia - posted on 06/15/2010

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No I don't work for a pharmacutical company...matter of fact I'm just a lowly stay at home mom who was in the Army for 8 years. I guess I am just a fucking dumbass who doesn't know how to do any research myself and just take everything someone who has a degree as law.

That isn't what choked me it was the fact that you would actually say something stupid as the fact that there haven't been any long term studies on vaccinations.

Yeah I said stupid...I wasn't attacking you earlier but since you want to assume some dumb shit about me then I guess we are even now.

I just hope you plan on homeschooling your kids because I sure don't want my child in school with your kids.

Jackie - posted on 06/15/2010

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My daughter has been vaccinated 100% on the suggested schedule and she will remain on that same schedule. My biggest problem with this is people don't vaccinate, then their child can pick up some disease that has been practically irradicated in this country (the US for me), spread it, etc etc...and it is no longer irradicated....yes I have a problem with that. Yes my daughter is vaccinated against it, but it's issues we don't need.

And I agree with the same train of thought in that myself and everyone I know (of all different ages) were all vaccinated fully and everyone is fine.

Do I believe there is a true link to autism, NOT AT ALL. Are there always those 1 in a million complications...sure...but there is with EVERYTHING.

Erin - posted on 06/15/2010

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I had no idea this was a Pro Vaccination site...

The fact still remains that the vaccination schedules have increased incredibly in the last 30 years so the vaccines that we took as children are not the same as the ones given to our kids. They combine these vaccines with toxins that have not been tested on humans. They also combine the vaccines with other vaccines which have not been tested together. They also tell you to do additional vaccines such as flu at the same time. Again, not having had them tested in combination with each other.

As I said earlier, this is my opinion and I have done the research with my husband.

Here are some sites for you:

www.icpa4kids.org

http://vaers.hhs.gov

Erin - posted on 06/15/2010

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My husband and did not vaccinate our son. We did plenty of research on the topic and decided it was not worth the risk. We have a niece and nephew with Autism. Our niece was perfectly normal before her 12 month vaccines and very shortly after was diagnosed on the "spectrum" and it took 3 years of intense therapy to get her back into her age group for things like speaking and walking.
I do not take vaccines for granted. If the research I did was convincing, I would vaccinate. But I believe that they can be dangerous to our children. Vaccines are relatively new and there are no long term studies that have satisfied my inquisitions on the effects of them on our developing children. When I was a child we needed about a dozen vaccines by the age of 12... now they suggest at least 2x that number!! I believe our bodies can fight off disease on their own when given the chance and injecting these random diseases directly into our blood streams in not only a shock to our bodies but can cause debilitating side effects, some of which we cannot recover from.
My husband is a chiropractor and has been treating our son naturally since the day he was born. He's never had so much as an ear infection and has never needed antibiotics. I believe in the way we are raising him and stand by all of our decisions with his healthcare.
I always "play nice" when it comes to this topic and never push my opinions on others but I find the same is not usually given to me in return.
Lets see if I'm right! Thanks for the opportunity to share!

LaCi - posted on 06/14/2010

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HPV effects more than just girls and causes more than cervical cancer. Can cause oral, throat, and tonsil cancers as well as anal cancers. Pretty much any area the virus gets into can be effected. We rarely discuss it though. I wouldn't be surprised if it caused cancers in the male genitals as well, but so far I haven't read anything about that. Vaccinating boys would help prevent them from spreading it to their partners, male or female.

LaCi - posted on 06/13/2010

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I probably would have had it (HPV Vac) had it been available when I was in the age range. I definitely don't think it should be a mandatory thing.

Kelly - posted on 06/13/2010

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I got my children vacinated with the exeption of flu shots, however I did fight as long as I could to have them take the varicella shot. Finally I had to get the kids vacinated or they would not allow them in school. I said then how long will this last?? They had no answers and now I am told they will need boosters. How many I wonder? Chicken Pox certainly had a low enough fatality rate that I was willing to take the chance rather then them getting Chicken Pox as adults with a very high death toll. Im all for vacinations, I just hate my kids being the "testers" to the new ones. :/

Rosie - posted on 06/13/2010

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i wish i would've had gardasil when i was younger. i have HPV, and i have also had dysplasia (abnormal cells of the cervix), it scared the shit out of me. luckily i have had normal pap smears ever since. no painful lasering like my sister and mother have had to do. i knew to use condoms, i didn't. knowledge isn't the only power, prevention is power as well.

Amy - posted on 06/12/2010

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"I believe in vaccinations, but I don't think the retraction of the study will do anything to persuade those who are firmly entrenched in the idea that vaccines are dangerous."

Well, there are risks associated with vaccines - they *can* be dangerous, but on the whole, the benefit outweighs the risk. All medical procedures are about an analysis of benefit vs. risk.

My daughter had most of her vaccinations on schedule. The chickenpox vaccine wasn't on the schedule & by the time it was available she'd already had chickenpox. This is one I'd need to be convinced of the long-term efficacy of, as chickenpox is much more dangerous in adulthood than childhood. My mother nursed a girl in her late teens who died from chickenpox. If it looked effective enough to wipe out chickenpox entirely, this would be a wonderful thing.

The only other vaccine I opted not to give after considerable research was the meningitis B offered here - I decided the benefits and long term effectiveness (which was not particularly promising for her age group) didn't outweigh the pain & any potential risks, given her low-risk profile - a white, breastfed child in low-density housing and not in daycare. I had friends who opted for MeNZb & I supported their decisions - their circumstances were different & you could fall on either side of the fence reading the information available. What I *didn't* like was the impassioned, ignorant debate volleyed back & forth between both the Ministry of Health and an anti-immunisation lobby group. Both used parents as a political football and chose emotional BS over facts.

I do wish that vaccines could be separated so that I can choose to give only those really important to my child's well being in the early weeks - such as whooping cough - and delay those she very unlikely to catch as an infant - such as hepatitis B. She was more settled during later vaccinations and it was less disruptive to breastfeeding.

On the whole though, unless your child has serious allergies or other medical conditions making vaccination particularly risky, it's better to be uninformed and vaccinate than uninformed and not vaccinate.

Charlie - posted on 06/12/2010

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I had my HPV vaccine , i also have epilepsy although i have had no fits in years ,no side affects for me , cervical cancer runs in my family so the benifits outweigh the risks for me , everyone i know has had theirs and no one i know of had any reaction to it except for two girlfriends of mine who had HPV before the vaccine and now no longer have it after the vaccine , the doctors still tell you , you need to get your pap smear , my doctor sends out a letter every two years to tell me im due for one .

Mari - posted on 06/12/2010

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I did get my little one vaccinated for the same reasons as what you have. You don't ant any of those illnesses since they have killed thousands and millions of kids and people already and those vaccins are just given to our kids, so yeah I do take them.Besides I have had mumps thice and I can tell you it is not fun at all. And besides I don't really belive or see a connection here how a vaccine can cause autism. Sorry if I sound ignorant here but this is just my opinion.

Suzette - posted on 06/12/2010

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Jodi,
"Personally, I wouldn't allow my daughter to have the HPV - I think it is too early, the vaccine has been rushed out, and I don't trust it yet."

And that's why I wouldn't allow it. I don't trust it because of how rushed I feel it has been. If they had taken more time with it, done more research, then I would be inclined to say yes and be a little more comfortable. But because of how damaging the side effects can be, even if they're not as likely to happen, I just don't want to go there.

I know there are quite a few girls who think that the HPV vaccine will make them invincible. Nothing makes a person invincible, though it'd be nice! Of course it'll be years before my little one has the chance to get the vaccine, maybe by then I'll feel more comfortable. Hopefully they'll have more research out on it then and it won't be as risky.

Jodi - posted on 06/12/2010

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Nikki, I don't believe it is mandatory. Personally, I wouldn't allow my daughter to have the HPV - I think it is too early, the vaccine has been rushed out, and I don't trust it yet.



Also, I don't think these young girls realise that they STILL have to have annual Pap Smear tests. My step-daughter had the HPV (her mother approved it), and she was fine, but when I mentioned about the pap smears, and still having to have them, she thought I was kidding. She honestly believed that having the HPV vaccine totally prevented cervical cancer, and she never had to bother with all that...... very concerning.

LaCi - posted on 06/12/2010

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I've heard many horror stories about the HPV vaccine. Its still rare to have such serious side effects but it can have permanent, horrible side effects. I'll try to look up articles later. I would let my daughter, if I had one, make the decision to get it or not.

Suzette - posted on 06/11/2010

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Nikki,

I hope it doesn't become mandatory here, I'll be fighting it every step of the way!

It can cause seizures, first of all. I have epilepsy and it's a sporadic genetic type. The last thing I want is for my daughter to have this vaccination and for the epilepsy to somehow be triggered. I don't know if it's possible, but if it's even the slightest bit possible, I don't want it to happen to her. Call me paranoid, I don't care! lol

Recently there was a lawsuit filed over the vaccine.
http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/news/212947-...

(I can attest to certain drugs causing behavioral problems when mixed with epilepsy medications, especially if the doctors don't know what the hell they're doing. Been there and done that when I was 14 yrs old.)

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-501263_162-4...

There are also other links that state that while this can "help" prevent cervical cancer, so can routine pap smears. My daughter can, and will, be checked regularly.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/08/1...

Nikki - posted on 06/11/2010

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Suzette, the HPV vaccine has been added to the schedule here in Australia, I have never heard of it having any side effects, what were they? I think it is year 8 girls are now immunised against it here.

Gelaine - posted on 06/11/2010

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funny that this comes up again, because another case was won by a family through federal courts for the mmr-v vaccine causing a child to have autism just a few days ago!!



actually it was about a year ago.. i read the date wrong..

Suzette - posted on 06/11/2010

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@Morag,

As far as the HPV vaccination, I don't know if I would get my daughter that either. There are so many side effects that I've heard of with that one that I'm sort of on the fence. I know there are many side effects with all vaccinations, but that one in particular sort of scares me more than, say the flu vaccination where they're likely to throw up for a couple of days.

I know if I lived where you do, I don't think that I could take the stance that you take. As you say, it's a personal choice. I respect yours, I just don't think I could make the same decision.

Morag - posted on 06/11/2010

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I have Crohn's and when I had my first in 1999, the whole Andrew Wakefield, M.D and autism controversy had just come out. It was actually accepted at the time, and due to the fact that my child was pre disposed to Crohn's I was warned by my doctor, health nurses and consultant to NOT vaccinate using the MMR. However, that was a very specific case. My youngest has received a majority of her vaccinations, but there are a few that she hasn't. These were the very expensive ones we could not afford at the time. Rota virus must be given before 6 months to be effective and we ran out of time, so she is unvaxed for rotavirus. She also never received the chicken pox. When she was due to have it there was an out break of chicken pox at a local primary school. The 9-12 year olds were struck down by chicken pox despite there being a nearly 100% vax rate here in Spain. Several kids died. It was then that the local health authority said that 9-12 year olds needed a booster shot as the vaccine (like tetanus needs a booster). My kid was 9 at the time, but the chicken pox vaccine wasn't available on the UK NHS when she was born so she never received it. Instead she contracted chicken pox 2 times normally when she was 2/3 thus giving her a life long immunity to the disease. Personally I hope that my youngest contracts chicken pox naturally. She wasn't vaxed for this reason. Maybe if they can create a better vaccination (one that can provide longer coverage especially as this is a disease that becomes more risky with age) then I will consider it at that time. However at the moment I choose not to.



My eldest is now due her HPV vaccine. Gardasil was removed by the Spanish health ministry after two children became sick after taking it in our region. For this reason my child won't be vaccinated against this. Also I want my child to continue fearing the fact that she may get cervical cancer in the future and have regular checks...I don't want her thinking "It's ok, I've had the jab, I can't get cancer." well the vaccine doesn't protect from all HPV virus and it doesn't protect against cancer. My aunt died of cervical cancer and she was a virgin (or so she said ;) ) although she was young, no children, never been married, still lived with her mother etc.



We don't do flu shots as they are in limited supply and as we are all healthy there is no need to take away a shot from a more needing person. We will more than likely survive flu, especially with our modern health system.



Personally this is an individual position. Do I think vaccinations are right or wrong... I can't say. I just don't know. I know that living just off the coast of North Africa and my children coming into contact with children with HepB, polio etc. I know the medical system could probably save them, but I just don't want to take that risk. If I lived in a small town in the states where someone from a third world country is just a picture in a magazine, I would have less risk and be less likely to take the risk of vaccinations. But I'm not. As I said, it's very individual as parents we just try to do the best we can by our kids.

Meghan - posted on 06/10/2010

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I am so GLAD this guys has been discredited. I have done SO much research on the issue as I have a nephew with SEVERE autism. I found the supposed corrilations silly. My boy is update (minues flu shots) and he is doing great!

Sarah - posted on 06/10/2010

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I only found out through COM's that other places vaccinate against chicken pox! I guess it's all what you're used to, we're brought up thinking it's not much of a big deal, so that's how we tend to view it.

My eldest has chicken pox when she was about 2 and it barely bothered her. I think it's worse the older you get.

I've had shingles too, when i was about 18. Wasn't too bad really. Again, I think it's more harmful the older you get. :)

Jackie - posted on 06/10/2010

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I am 27, my brother is 33, my father is 55. None of us have EVER has the Chicken Pox. I even played with children that had it when I was about 2 so I could get it over with (according to my Mom) I guess there i something in our immune system that make us immune. With that being said, I have a 15mo and I did get her vaccinated becuase if she got and then gave it me somehow, there could be a serious risk.

Jodi - posted on 06/09/2010

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Joanne, I am pretty sure it came in sometime in 2006 (it did in ACT anyway), because my daughter was supposed to have it on her scheduled vaccinations at 18 months, and she is now 5. I didn't do it until she was 4 because I didn't realise it had changed - it wasn't in our little blue book as on the schedule, so I didn't take her to get it done at 18 months, LOL.

Joanne - posted on 06/09/2010

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Just commenting on Chicken Pox vac.I am in Australia also and it is only recently been introduced on the immunization shedule. The immunization for chicken pox is more to protect adults i think,as Suzette stated, obviously giving it to our children may stop it spreading to adults who have never had it. A very close friend of mine contracted chicken pox at the age of 20 and ended up in hospital for two weeks, it is definately more serious to get as an adult. Both my husband and I have never had chicken pox, so I decided when our 1st child was born we would all get this vaccination. At this time 5yrs ago it wasnt on the 'free' vax list so it cost me an arm and leg but well worth it for my families safety and well being.

LaCi - posted on 06/09/2010

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I guess that means he will be needing the shingles vaccine as an adult? Fantastic.

Suzette - posted on 06/09/2010

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Personally, I'm all for immunizations. My daughter will have them all, on time. ;)



As for chicken pox, it can be dangerous, especially for adults.



"Complications

Chickenpox (varicella) rarely causes complications, but it is not always harmless. It can cause hospitalization and, in rare cases, death. Fortunately, since the introduction of the vaccine in 1995, hospitalizations have declined by nearly 90%, and there have been few fatal cases of chickenpox.



Adults have the greatest risk for dying from chickenpox, with infants having the next highest risk. Males (both boys and men) have a higher risk for a severe case of chickenpox than females. Children who catch chickenpox from family members are likely to have a more severe case than if they caught it outside the home. The older the child, the higher the risk for a more severe case. But even in such circumstances, chickenpox is rarely serious in children. Other factors put individuals at specifically higher risk for complications of chickenpox."



There are more severe things listed on the site as well, such as if caught during pregnancy, a syndrome called Reye Syndrome, problems in blood clotting, inflammation of nerves in hands and feet, heart, testicles, liver, joints, or kidneys.

http://adam.about.com/reports/Shingles-a...

[deleted account]

I did a little research:

"The chickenpox vaccine is now licensed in the UK but it is not part of routine childhood vaccinations.



The vaccine against the varicella virus (which causes chickenpox) is not currently recommended for standard use in children.



In most cases it is a mild illness and around 89% of adults in the UK will develop immunity to the illness.



If the chickenpox vaccine were to be added to the list of childhood vaccinations, it is feared that there would be a greater number of cases of shingles in adults, until the vaccination was given to the entire population. This is because adults who have had chickenpox as a child are less likely to have shingles in later life if they have been exposed occasionally to the chickenpox virus (for example by their children). This is because the exposure acts as a booster vaccine."



This explains why it's not part of the standard childhood immunisations over here. What next a tonsilitis vaccine?

Jodi - posted on 06/09/2010

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Jennifer, it is now also on the mandated schedule here in Australia. I don't understand why either. My son had chickenpox when he was 2 (it wasn't on the schedule back then and was purely voluntary so I didn't bother) and it wasn't that bad. My daughter, however, was vaccinated when she had her 4 year old boosters because by then it had become part of the schedule.

[deleted account]

Most people get it as children under the age of 15 and once they've had it their bodies usually produce an immunity to the infection so they are not infected in future. Occasionally adults who have had chicken pox get it again and it is then called shingles. My granda has had chicken pox but has just been diagnosed with an immune problem so if anyone gets chicken pox he can't be anywhere near them as it could make him very ill.

Sounds like another way for the American medical professions to get more money, nevermind =]

LaCi - posted on 06/09/2010

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I guess chicken pox is enough of an inconvenience that they made a vaccine... I dunno... apparently theres a 90% chance I'll never know since he's already gotten it lol. I never knew chicken pox was a big deal either, not for children anyhow. I knew adults had issues with it and could understand an adult who has never had it getting the vaccine.. don't really understand why my 2 year old needed it..

[deleted account]

Chicken pox vaccine lmao! Over here in the Uk there's no such thing. Most people get chicken pox and people don't die from it so I'm very confused as to why there's a vaccine for it elsewhere!!! My friend's nearly 1 year old daughter has chicken pox at the moment.

Julia - posted on 06/09/2010

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ahhh shit...I just found out that parents don't have to prove that they are a part of a religion.

A South Carolina Certificate of Religious Exemption (DHEC form 1126) may be granted to any student whose parent, guardian, or person in loco parentis signs the appropriate section of the exemption stating they are members of a recognized religious denomination in which the tenets and practices of the religious denomination conflict with immunizations

LaCi - posted on 06/09/2010

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Yeah the form in IN and KY says "religious beliefs" but includes philosophical opposition. ;/



There is a clause in the KY exemption that states in the case of an outbreak they can mandate all people be vaccinated. Not in IN though..

Julia - posted on 06/09/2010

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YAY!!! Just found out that the state of SC only allows Religious and Medical exemptions!!!

Jackie - posted on 06/09/2010

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That's a really scary thought. 30% that's HUGE and rediculous if you ask me

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