Death Penalty

Shannon - posted on 07/06/2009 ( 26 moms have responded )

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Where do you stand? Why?

(saw it got off topic on another post and was curious)

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Dawn - posted on 07/31/2009

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My husband is a correctional officer and I had to tell him to stop telling me why some guys were lifers. I can't repeat things but there are some guys that are murders and are just wacked! We need to do something with the system with all prisoners not just fixing the death penalty and reducing that amount of appeals they can have. We have lots of gangs boys that have no problem and still can carry out orders in and out of the prisons. I never knew how hard and scarry working in a prison can be until my husband got a job there last year. We (tax payers) pay out a lot of money for the crack heads for getting their teeth fixed. In Washington they can get their GED or one college degree. They can also lose their tvs and other stuff really quickly when they act up.

Also the death penalty is carried out by a physican under the state.

Maleasha - posted on 07/24/2009

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My husband worked in a Montana county jail that also held federal prisoners and he was constintly saying how nice the federal prisoners had. Flat screen plasma TVs, a high tech gym for them to work out in, cable tv, the internet, free schooling, free healthcare and the list goes on.



I have mixed feelings about the death penalty, but something needs to be done a our prison system. They have more luxuries that most americans can only dream of. My husband was telling me about the repeat offenders that admitted to wanting to come back because it was better than what they had on the outside. Some of the federal prisoners looked like body builders. That scares me. They go to prison to be punished for a crime and come out stronger than when they went in.

Shannon - posted on 07/16/2009

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Your welcome. Some articles are older than others, but I got on a phone call and just posted - I was going to add that as a note: that is why some of the numbers differ, the more recent articles are near the bottom.

ME - posted on 07/15/2009

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Awesome...thank you for all that info...I knew that stats about IL, but not about the rest of it.

Shannon - posted on 07/15/2009

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Quoting Lindsay:

Now we have dna and other tests that can prove someone is guilty or innocent. We didn't always have those so a lot of people were on dp when they shouldn't have been but it was those tests that proved they were innocent. I haven't heard of any recent cases that were thrown out because the person was really innocent. They are all from years ago when the tests weren't available.



That is incorrect - our legal system is faulty. There is evidence that isn't allowed, and often there isn't enough DNA to test, or the defense attorney is pro bono and does very little actual work toward trying to aquit his (possibly innocent) client. (Not all defense attorneys, of course, these are just some examples of how the system fails.)




Here are few articles with excerpts with statistics:




 




In Illinois - For every seven executions, one Death Row inmate has been exonerated. And surely more will turn up in the future as more and more people are convicted of capital crimes, proponents push for speedier executions, and legal help becomes less and less available for those who commit capital crimes...
The three main factors that contribute to mistaken convictions are: perjured testimony from jailhouse snitches; mistaken identification by witnesses, and false confessions....The vast majority of false convictions, however, are the result of inept legal representation. Poor people are often unable to hire competent lawyers and must fall back on lawyers appointed by the court to represent them.




http://www.associatedcontent.com/article...




 




In the 23 years since the Supreme Court allowed the resumption of state executions, 80 prisoners across the country have been released from death row due to questions surrounding their prosecution and conviction. Of the 3,500 inmates currently on death row, at least 14 percent are believed to be innocent, according to statistics provided by the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington, D.C.




Some say that estimate may be conservative.




They point to the widely accepted statistic that 1 of every 7 people currently on death row is innocent as sufficient grounds for rethinking the policy. "What if we were to tell legislators and other death penalty advocates that for every seven of them, one will be sentenced to death and executed?"




http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1...




 




"Since 1973, 87 prisoners have been released from death row after new evidence suggested they were innocent...And late acquittals are increasing. Between 1973 and 1993, an average of 2.5 death row inmates a year were found to be innocent. In the six years after that, the rate nearly doubled to 4.6" (The Economist, 10 June 2000, p.21)




 





The administration of the death penalty is fraught with error and results in the conviction and execution of the innocent. To date, 135 death-row inmates have been exonerated in the modern death penalty era. Herman Lindsey became the 135th person exonerated from death row after the Florida Supreme Court unanimously ruled that there was insufficient evidence to convict him and ordered his release. The most recent North Carolina exoneree was ACLU Capital Punishment Project client Levon "Bo" Jones, on May 2, 2008. Strong evidence has also emerged that seven men have been executed despite their innocence.




http://www.aclu.org/capital/index.html

Lindsay - posted on 07/15/2009

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Now we have dna and other tests that can prove someone is guilty or innocent. We didn't always have those so a lot of people were on dp when they shouldn't have been but it was those tests that proved they were innocent. I haven't heard of any recent cases that were thrown out because the person was really innocent. They are all from years ago when the tests weren't available.

ME - posted on 07/15/2009

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I'm not sure that would work so well for the dozens of people who were found completely innocent 5, 10, or 20 years later! I, for one, am thrilled that so many states have realized that we are all human and fallable, and placed moratoriums on the DP! Hooray for rational thought!!!

Lindsay - posted on 07/15/2009

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Those locked up shows show the most extreme cases and the prisoners play it up for the camera. In high school we went to a prison and they even said that when we walked through the prison they would play it up for us. What else are they going to do lol tell us how great they have it there? But being raped and forced to join a gang is probably a better future than most of their victims have so sorry if i don't shed tears for them. Of course they aren't happy they're in prison but their choices landed them there. They made the choice to break the law, no one forced them to do it. I do however think if they aren't serving life or on death row they should be allowed tp have some job training but not on the tax payers dime.



As for the dp being a deterrent why would it be? It takes so long for the punishment to be carried out of course people don't see it as being a big deal. They have the trial and make a big deal out of the crime and then nothing happens. Thats like when your kids do something against the rules and then 10 years later you ground them for it. It doesn't make much sense.

If it didn't take so long i bet people would think twice about it but a criminal doesn't really think about the punishment anyway. Thats why they are criminals they dont care.

Traci - posted on 07/14/2009

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I've read different numbers that do show the death penalty to be a deterrent...I need to start saving stuff, lol.



We are obviously have different sets of values here, Jenny, you're not gonna change my mind, and I'm not gonna change yours. But the US has a more diverse population than Canada...so you're comparing apples to oranges. I'm not talking about diverse in terms of only race, either. We are very different here, and I'm perfectly content with it! :)



Someone who violently rapes a woman does not deserve to be treated as a human being. They deserve to be fed through a hole in a prison cell and nothing more. They don't deserve to be forgiven, much less an education paid for by the taxpayers. They don't deserve a shrink to help them learn about some baloney head shrink crap that happened in their early childhood years.

Jenny - posted on 07/14/2009

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I don't think any laws truly serve as a deterrent, people who perform criminal acts beleive they will not be caught or they would probably not do it in the first place. Prison should not be a place of just punishment but a place to reteach life skills and mold contributing members of society. Right now prison teaches criminals how to be better criminals. Instead of complaining that they get free education, why not push your government to provide free education for all citizens? Or rob a bank and you're in! lol. How do you expect someone who's been imprisoned to come out wanting to be a postive contributor to society if they spend years not treated like a person at all? I know you're big on punishing "the bad guys" down there but unless you want to just spend all your money keeping them incarcerated forever it will continue to be a revolving door. Don't you think about why you have the highest per capita prisoner level on the planet? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cou... Canada is 117 and you know what, I feel safe. I walk alone at night and I leave my doors unlocked sometimes. It is not about "getting the bad guy" it is about a culture change.



Sometimes though I believe you get people who cannot function properly in our society and are harmful. These people are few and far between and I believe we should thouroughly study them and then put them out of their misery. People like Charles Manson, Jeffrey Dahmer, John Wayne Gacy etc. I don't see the death penalty as punishment for these people and I don't want to see anyone tortured or to suffer no matter who they are. Just slip the needle in, put them out of thier misery and be done with it.

Shannon - posted on 07/14/2009

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It has been statistically proven that it is not a deterrent, or at least that is what my Ethics prof taught us. She had numbers to back it up but I don't have the worksheet available.

I'm not sure how it would NOT be a deterrent, I'm just repeating like a good little student.

Traci - posted on 07/13/2009

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I think the death penalty does serve somewhat as a deterrent, but I am still not sure about it. If something bad happened to a family member, I'd want to see the dude fry. Not lay there while a sterile, painless injection stops his beating heart...I'd want to see him suffer...



On a lighter note, lol, prison needs to be prison. No cable, no conjugal visits, no comraderie, no suing prisons over serving creamy instead of crunchy peanut butter...bread and water and manual labor! That's where it's at! I like that Sheriff Arpaio guy...he's great!!!

Shannon - posted on 07/13/2009

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I'm not sure, but I think it is all done in state prisons, by state employees.

Why do you ask?

Jenny - posted on 07/13/2009

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I mean as to where they are actually performed and who was the executioner. I know there is a large network of private prisons and was wondering if any of them would have that duty.

Shannon - posted on 07/13/2009

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Government, it is state legislated. The death penalty laws are different in each state. NY currently has a moratorium on the death penalty and is no longer using it.

Jenny - posted on 07/13/2009

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Do any private prisons perform executions or is it done strictly through the government?

JL - posted on 07/13/2009

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I watch those locked up shows and well sorry to be overt about this but I don't think being raped in prison and forced to join a gang for survival and being someones biatch looks like an easy and lovely existence to me. I had a friend who went to prison for a drug violation..a minor one in my opinion and he will not talk about what it was like but I can tell you he is not the same person..he is angry and dark and he was a happy go lucky hippy before so I think the system in general is messed up. I get making prison a crappy experience and I am for having supermax prison for the worst and most dangerous criminlas but what about the people who we know will be eventually put back out on the streets...do we turn them into even more harden criminals or set up ways to help them reestablish themselves in a positive way back into the world outside of prison.

ME - posted on 07/13/2009

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I am not in favor of the death penalty because I could NEVER be the one to put a person to death. I feel, therefore, that it is impossible for me to coherently support it. I also agree with Sara..."Killing someone who killed someone to show that killing is wrong" is kind of schizophrenic. I believe that our criminal justice system is just another system in this country that needs to be overhauled and brought up to date! In a related topic...there is a show on the history channel about gang violence where prisons are sometimes featured...I don't think most prisons are the nice places some of you seem to think they are. Only wealthy white color criminals who steal billions from the avg. joes of America wind up in those kinds of prisons... and I don't think they deserve them either...

Gina - posted on 07/11/2009

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Has anyone seen the movie Les Miserables. If we had prisons like that and they put death row inmates in that type of a prison, then I would be fine to get rid of the death penalty!

JL - posted on 07/11/2009

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I would rather have someone suffer horribly in isolation for their rest of their miserable existence without out any outside contact beyond the occasional push of food into their cell. I am a supporter of Supermax prisons as they were originally meant to be and that is for the worst of criminals..murders, rapists, serial killers, and terrorists, because these prisons are meant for total isolation and allow for no extras or human contact. I sometimes think that death row is too easy of a route..I know this sounds horrible but that is just not enough suffereing for someone who he is a sick killer. I would rather they be locked in a room alone with only themselves because the sad fact is that many murders crave the attention and self wallow in being put on death row. They like to think of themselvse as martyrs with fans and as if it is their execution is their last big show. Plus I cannot deal with the fact that we do have innocent people or people with questionable convictions sitting on death row and that pisses me off because the real murders are out there just living it up and possibly doing the same thing while an innocent person is praying that they are not legally murdered for someone elses crimes.

Sara - posted on 07/11/2009

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I do not support the death penalty. I do not believe that killing someone who killed someone to show that killing is wrong is the right thing to do. Do I think murderers should live lives of leisure in a supermax with cable TV? No, I think they should have a miserable existence, which is far worse in my mind than death.

Shannon - posted on 07/08/2009

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My biggest, possibly only, problem with the death penalty is that we still convict innocent people. 'Beyond a reasonable doubt' still indicates doubt and isn't good enough for me. If they confess or are caught red-handed I have no problem with the death penalty.

As for the prison system - don't forget they have free health care! I recently read an article that suggested if you need a kidney transplant that you can't afford you should throw a brick through a post office window. That is a mandatory 3 years in federal prison and the Mayo Clinic has an entire wing for federal prisoners. Lovely.

Lindsay - posted on 07/07/2009

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Im for the death penalty only because prison isn't really a punishment nowdays. I would much rather have a lot of these criminals have to do hard labor for the rest of their lives, earn their beds, food, and shelter with no tv, internet, gym, visits, or time outside but that won't happen because "its mean" to the criminals. It also really pisses me off that they get to use our taxes to finish high school and take college classes. They are in prison to be punished.

I do think the dp needs to be done faster. It shouldn't take 10 years to carry out the dp.

Shannon - posted on 07/07/2009

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Quoting Jenny:

I support the death penalty but not for monetary reasons. I believe that some people's brains just don't work right and they can not function in society without being dangerous to others. I've read alot of serial killer books and for some it is a terrible burden. I look at it like putting them out of thier misery. Before they are put to sleep though I'd like to see them thouroughly researched and brain scanned to learn as much about thier various mental and physical attributes as we can to possibly work out treatments in the future.


 



I've never even thought of it that way, interesting.

Jenny - posted on 07/07/2009

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I support the death penalty but not for monetary reasons. I believe that some people's brains just don't work right and they can not function in society without being dangerous to others. I've read alot of serial killer books and for some it is a terrible burden. I look at it like putting them out of thier misery. Before they are put to sleep though I'd like to see them thouroughly researched and brain scanned to learn as much about thier various mental and physical attributes as we can to possibly work out treatments in the future.

Shannon Cassidy- - posted on 07/07/2009

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I support the Death Penalty, Why should a murderer live and actualy live better then some of us I mean they get three meals a day its not a 5 star meal but its food, they always Know they are going to have a roof over their head , clothes on their back , alot of them go to classes to better themselves , they have jobs they don't get payed much they do get a little something, I am sure they have families that send them money or what ever else they need. Its the tipe of life nobody wants to live but at least its life.









What about the people they killed, they wanted to live as much as the people who killed them. Those people must have begged and begged for their lives and were ignored then tortured and left for dead and those murderers are still alive they don't have the freedom to come and go like we do . But they still have their lives.









Its even harder when you know they murdred a child,a sweet, little helpless child ,theres no telling what they go through I can't imagine.









All those people wanted to live thats the main issue, and they are no longer on this earth. Why should the people that killed them beable to be on this earth as well being supported by us. These Liberals that say oh they deserve to live thats murder killing them . Well what do you think they did when they KILLED THEIR VICTIMS. Sometimes just living with what they did in a little cell day in and day out is torture to them enough, But then their are prisinors the denie it or it doesn't even fase them. To be honest with you they have to live in the deathrow section not knowing if this is going to be the day which is fine with me knowing that their victims new they were going to die but didn't know when so it kind of evens it off. But when the time comes for them to die its so quick maybe not painless , but quick. Nobody knows how long it took their victims to stop feeling their pain.

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