Can you suggest a fun summer activity like berry picking that helps kids learn where food comes from? Please link to a picture we can use if you have one.

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27  Answers

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For one thing we have a tiny garden, and I grow things like wild strawberries, Apples, elderberries, Tomatoes, bell peppers, pumpkins and lots of herbs, also such that you can make into kid friendly (ice) teas like peppermint or lemon balm. My kids are only 3 and 1.5yrs but they already help me watering and weeding and seeding in the garden and they enjoy it very much! The 3 yr old already understands what we are doing.

It also helps that we have dairy farms and sheep and goats in our neighborhood so my kids dont think that milk comes from a tetra pack ;-)

Also I walk the woods regularly with them as we have a dog, and we always go blue berry picking in July.


http://creativespiderbite.blogspot.de/2013/08/how-local-forests-look-after-us.html

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4 0

My suggestion would be to plant your own small garden in the backyard, that's what we do. We've had a garden for the past two years. We plant strawberries, corn, bell peppers, sweet peppers, blueberries and cantaloupe. The strawberries are always a family favorite. The kids love watching the plants grow, blossom & produce yummy berries. We harvest the berries and add them to our pancakes for weekend breakfasts! Kids love helping in the garden & it makes them appreciate all the hard work that goes into growing the food we all eat.

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The best thing I ever did was start a garden with my kids. It has helped them become more in-tune with where food comes from and they are quick to eat the veggies and fruits they cared for and planted. I even let them pick out what we planted to make sure there were involved from start to finish.

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6 0

I started a vegetable garden for my family but tried to make it extra fun for my son. We grew beans and peas up a teepee made of found sticks. I created a sunflower house by planting the seeds in a large circle. And I set up a space where my son could plant whatever he wanted. By the middle of the summer, he had a fun and magical place to play and he learned all about where his food comes from.

http://www.onepartsunshine.com/blog/1577

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0 0

As both a Mom and a farm educator, I know that the best way, hands down, to help children learn where food comes from (and to eat healthy food) is to grow it. Whether you have a farm, a backyard garden, or some seeds in a pot on your deck or in the windowsill, children love to see things grow. The first thing they want to do upon pulling a carrot out of the ground is eat it!

http://www.threadandladle.com/2013/05/in-may-garden.html

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I'd like to go visit SunTech Greenhouses south of Manotick. Lots of their own grown produce plus a need shop: http://www.suntech.ca/our_store.html

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2 0

We've been trying our hand at gardening. Nothing too big yet, just some potted herbs and a few vegetables but my daughter has been able to see the plants grow and literally taste the veggies of our labor! And, she likes to go over and take little bits of fresh basil and rosemary to munch on, too. Unfortunately, our garden last year was not as bountiful as we would have hoped for but there is always this year's crop!

http://teenytinyfoodie.com/how-did-our-garden-grow/

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11 0

Having our own little garden and having the girls help with planting and maintaining it is both fun and beneficial. Since we are renting our current home, digging up an area of our back yard is out of the question. However, it's just as easy to grow vegetables in pots along our patio. The girls get to help out with water and picking. When it's time to eat, they connect that what they're snacking on came from our yard and they actually had a hand in producing it!

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My husband builds 'cute' greenhouses for fun, and our daughter, Elfie, has gotten into gardening with him (which is a good thing since I kill anything with roots). Elfie likes to name all of the tomato plants and keep track of who the plants get "adopted out to" when we give them to friends and family members. Because of the greenhouse, we get tomatoes from spring through late fall. And at the end of summer, our Gala apple trees starts kicking out fruit. This all means that on school mornings, the kids go out and pick tomatoes and apples for their lunches. So when winter comes along, I get a little bitter and cranky about the fact that I have to deal with buying it all on my own. I think we all walk into the grocery store with more discerning eyes but also a greater appreciation for the work that goes into ALL that food. Growing your own food makes you strangely grateful and spoiled at the same time.

http://worldsworstmoms.com/greenhouses-from-the-ground-up/?wprptest2=0

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0 1

I love bringing my kids into the garden and encourage them to plant along side us various kid friendly vegetables and fruits that are easy to grow. Peas, Green Beans, Potatoes, Carrots, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Kale, Strawberries, Blueberries are all fun to grow and harvest with kids! If you're not quite sure where to start visit your local farms for U Pick together or the Farmer's Markets. It's a great way to learn what grows in your area and to try new things! We share tips for Kids in the Garden on our website and pinterest boards too! http://bit.ly/gardeningwithkids

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Have a look at this post of mine using wild garlic from the farm and muscles from the beach

http://bit.ly/17vv7ZS

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0 8

We took the kids to a strawberry patch for the first time this year. They had no idea how food grew before that trip. I think all kids learn better when it's hands on. http://www.twinglemommmy.com/2013/05/strawberry-picking-at-phillips-farm-of.html

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14 0

The very best way we teach our twins about food and where it comes from is a true gift: we are part of a local farm community (run by a family member!) and we visit the farm weekly to pick vegetables, fruits, and learn about what is growing now and why. It's inspiring and beautiful because my children try new, just-picked veggies every week ranging from kale to radishes to bok choy. It's like going back in time -- visiting the farm, gathering our food, cooking it that night and week. It's a weekly gift we are delighted to have in our family every summer (and this winter we are joining the winter share for year round produce). Eventually, our twins will work on this farm, too. Good food, community, giving back, and supporting local farmers -- life lessons that I know our twins will pass along. NOTE: most communities have local farm shares and they are easy to fine online and to join. I suggest everyone look into this. And we are also growing our own veggies this year, too.

http://www.mysocalledsensorylife.com/?p=3891

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Through her preschool last year we went to the local strawberry farm. We rode in a wagon and they went from patch to patch where various vegetables were being grown such as fresh carrots, onions, and of course strawberries! What was so wonderful is that the entire wagon filled with preschoolers were able to taste these fresh fruit and vegetables straight from the ground (after being cleaned off in a bucket of fresh water), but it really honed in to the kids where food comes from and how it is grown.

http://dandelionmoms.com/2013/05/play-12-great-summer-activities/

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I do three food based things with my 8 year old daughter in the summer. Gardening, berry picking, and small batch canning. She loves all three and snacks on fresh fruits and veggies year round.

http://www.homemakingorganized.com/in-the-kitchen/cooking/3-ways-you-can-help-your-child-appreciate-where-their-food-comes-from/

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113 2

My kids and I do enjoy berry picking, and we can hardly pass a "pick your own" orchard without pulling in for a basket of apples or peaches. We also make trips to the local farmers market - not as direct as the orchard visits, but still a different experience than the grocery store. They also go fishing with their father, then enjoy delicious fresh fish for dinner - from the ocean to the table.

http://slackermomof4.blogspot.com/2011/06/fieldtrip-blueberry-gardens.html

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Grow your own! You don't have to have a large yard- or any yard at all- to grow your own food. Plant tomatoes in pots on the deck, potatoes in buckets or herbs on the windowsill. My kids have always been active participants in our garden, from seed starting, planting, weeding, harvesting and eating. It's a family activity that we all love.

http://allboyhomeschool.blogspot.com/search/label/garden

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7 0

Living in rural Mississippi we have many opportunities to take our children to pick fresh fruit and vegetables either from our garden or by helping family and friends with theirs. My husband's uncle is disabled and we love taking the kids to pick green beans. We have cornfields all around our house. Luckily the owners are friends and they let us take our kiddos to pull corn! We also like to go berry picking with a close family friend! It is so much fun for the kids and really good for them too! We also have a chicken coop! Our children all love to check for fresh eggs!

Link to berry picking:

http://www.piggyinpolkadots.com/2012/06/bittersweet-week-blueberry-picking.html

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6 0

We plant tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, lettuces, peas, and strawberries...and we pick, wash, and eat those as they come available.

We also go to the apple orchard every year. We talk about the different kind of apples and how they are best used. We figure out how many apples to get of each kind depending on how long they "keep". Apples are also great for teaching fractions...half, quarter, eights, etc. And while we check out new recipes in cookbooks and on the internet, we always make apple dumplings, apple sauce, and put some chopped apples and cinnamon in our pancakes. Yum!

http://www.singlemomsasksara.com/images/GirlsInTree.jpg

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0 0

I know this so basic but making butter is a super fun activity to do with kids! They learn about working hard for your food and you get homemade butter! http://www.gerberadesigns.com/triedandtrue/?p=1850

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We love going to a local orchard where my son can actually pick the fruit that's currently in season. In late May, we pick strawberries, later in the summer we pick peaches and plums, and in September, we pick apples. We get to ride a tractor out to the fields where an employee gives instructions about how to choose the best, ripest fruit. Then we pick it ourselves, and after paying for it, enjoy some of our fruit with a picnic lunch.

http://www.oneartsymama.com/2011/05/free-vacations.html

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