Is it common for the 2nd child to talk later than your 1st?

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17  Answers

0 17

I'm a 34-year-old woman now but I was once a second child that hardly spoke for the first 4 years of my life. My older sister was a big reason for this. When my parents asked me a question, my sister would answer for me. My mother took me to a specialist and disovered there was nothing wrong with me. In time I started talking more. To all the worried mothers I suggest patience. if you keep asking that quiet child questions, one day he or she will answer.

Meredith Ricketts

4
0 0

I'm currently experiencing the same thing and everyone around me makes way more of an issue about it than I do. We have a 5 yr old girl who had an extensive vocabulary by the time she was 18 months; the same age my son is now and who only says, mama, dada, hat, hot, bra, and gee-gee (his fav. toy)...but he is CRAZY smart, just like my daughter was and still is. I've been teaching him ASL and he knows many signs, he is responsive, he understands direction and conversational flow very well, and he grasps ideas well...he can tell you the sound o about 6 different animals and distinguishes between different animals and actions in books...he just rather not talk. Our daughter had the advantage of learning both sign and English as well and she was much more interested in speaking...our son just isn't. If he wasn't developing extremely well in every other area, THEN I'd be worried, but it's very obvious to me that not speaking is a choice for him, not an in capability. ;)

2
37 150

I was a second child, and I started talking and forming sentences way younger than my older sister.

2
25 19

My second definitely talked later than my first. I had a friend who was a speech therapist and (like any concerned mom) asked her about it; she kind of laughed and told me not to worry. I dug in my fingernails and waited. Flash forward 8 years, and #2 won't *stop* talking--and has developed just fine, as a matter of fact she is in 3rd grade, reading at an 8th grade level.

2
2 10

My daughter's second child took much longer to speak than her first. The older one would talk for the younger one and so she never had to answer for herself. They had to address the younger one directly and wait for her to answer for herself. Eventually it worked and then they had two little chatterboxes!

2
9 27

I am experiencing that now. I have a three year old and then twins that are 2. The twin boy refuses to say anything. For a while I thought something was wrong and even put him in speak therapy. He can speak but you have to pry it out of him. Now when he wants something I make him reapeat a whole sentence after me in order for him to get it. Like the other person said they are so use to pointing and we giving them what they want and his older brother doing all of the talking they that he wont talk.

0 12

My second son talked much later - not till after he turned 3. He would point and grunt and that was all except ma-ma. We finally found out it was because his brother (2 years, 9 months older) spoke for him. He was an excellent big brother and loved taking care of his brother. He even helped potty train him. He would take him to the bathroom when he had an accident, get a warm wash cloth and help him get cleaned up and get him new clothes when he needed to change and help him into them. He would anticipate what his brother wanted/needed and he understood his grunts and hand signals better than anyone else and always got him what he wanted. My husband and I made an appointment with the pediatrician about him not talking and just happened to take his brother with us. Every time the doctor asked a question about my younger son his older brother would answer... especially when the doctor asked the younger one a question to see his response. It was very hard to tell my older son he couldn't do that anymore. He was so sad and thought he had done something bad. He eventually understood though when his brother began to speak only weeks later.

1
1 9

I have 2 boys, 7 years apart and my youngest talked way before my oldest did. I think he learned how to talk from his older brother. He was always watching and listening to his brother talk, and just caught on. And to this day he's still a chatter box, compaired to his older brother. I think it all depends on the child.

1
28 8

If the other children or adults stop speaking for the child they will talk. My granddaughter doesn't have any siblings just cousins and all of us adults now exactly what she wants and so she did not speak. Finally a friend intervened and made our almost two year old start talking and now she is trying to form words and can say pease and thanks. They will all get around if we just stop talking for them lol

1
19 15

WOW!! And here I thought its the other way around!!

My second child (18mnts) has been talking for the last 8 months already. and I believe it is because of her older (5yr) sister. She would sing her songs and read her books (read.... more tell stories and show pictures). I've noticed that the last couple of months the older sister will teach the younger to say words, she'll go "say chair" and when lo says it we will all go "yeeehhh WEL DONE!!) Big sis is very proud of this!

0
0 0

This is a hard situation for us now. We had our then 2 year old evaluated and now at 2.5 she is starting to try to imitate every word. Too bad our state early intervention program is already wanting to slap labels on her. I know she can talk because she does. She is behind in that area but is progressing normally and ahead in other areas. Our son is 4 and does not speak for her. Everyone says that. It's more like if he wanted a drink we got her one but now we make her ask. Parents think twice before having your child evaluated. I thought our child was normal and now I know she is, it's just too bad she is under a microscope! We had her evaluated at 18 mths and she was too far ahead in all other areas. A short 6 mths later she is "delayed!"

0
0 4

The simple answer to that is, the first child speaks for the second child. It happened with my two and again with my grandchildren.

0
0 1

AS my oldest told me - when he was 31/2 yrs and his sister was 2yrs --"she doesn't have to talk to you - she tells me and I'll tell you -- He would speak for her - would have to remind him to let her talk

0
17 56

I think it would depend on whether the older child does the speaking for the younger and is more dominant than encouraging. Some kids encourage and help their younger siblings which tend to help in the growth and communication. Others tend to maintain an upper hand in the name of help - and reasons may vary - by speaking for them or drowning out the attempts of the younger to communicate. There are degrees of these two extremes of course. In either case, a communication technique that helps is to solicit the older child's help to allow and lightly encourage the younger to communicate and experience whatever difficulties he or she may experience in beginning to communicate. Done effectively, this can show the elder that their help is valuable and wanted. There are many ways of doing this, and thinking them up is a fun and creative activity that should be planned with the elder child.

0
0 1

No not all. It really depends when the child is surrounded by people who talks and communicates regularly with them. My second child was diagnosed to be deaf, hence couldn't talk!?! "Que horror!?" Not true, the young boy was just very observant, until he learned to assert himself to talk. I let him read the subtitles in tv and movies, asked a lot of questions and explain his painting/drawing. He's a grown-up teenage boy now and talks a lot :) so no need to worry if your child does not speak 1,000 vocabulary words at age 3 ;)

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7 0

I don't know if it's common but it was dfeinitely my experience. I wasn't even a 2nd child. I myself didn't start talking until much later. My mom says that when I finally started to talk, it was in complete sentences.

Like Mary Anderson, my #2 also won't stop talking. I think she wants to major in drama! :D

0
2 6

Hi,

My second one also spoke much later than the first, and for the reasons mentioned below; he had a sister who spoke for him and could convey his wishes by gestures very well, thank you.

I don't think it's a reason for concern, as long as the child has a clear understanding of what is said to him (i.e deafness ruled out). Through school, when they are seperated from the sibling, they catch up very quickly.

There is no harm, however, if there is any concern, to have the situation evaluated.

0
114 0

This happened to us when we had our 2nd one. By the time he was 3 he still was not talking so I had him evaluated and he had the vocabulary of a 1 1/2 old. We started speach therapy with him and it followed at school through the school board. He would be at his home school for half a day and then be transported to his 2nd school for the afternoon. This class was for speach therapy only. It was conducted like a regular class but with therapy in mind. I have to say that now he's almost 14 years old and I'm 100% sure that if we had not gotten him in therapy on time he would still be struggling with this speach.

0
5 61

My grandson was a third child and talked a lot but was hard to understand. My son and daughter in law insisted on seeing an ENT just in case and he had fluid build up in his inner ear and had tubes put in. The same thing with my great neice so it is better to be safe than sorry.

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