How can you tell if a child is gifted?

Sometimes anything a child does seems amazing to her mother, but how do you know when a child is actually more gifted than the average child?

40  Answers

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It sounds like most of you just need another outlet to brag about your child/children. In the grand scheme of things, it will not matter how "gifted" your child is. What will matter is how well they are taught to utilize their skills and abilities.

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Every child is different and special. We just answered a question and the best way to answer a question is with your own experiences.

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All children are gifted at something. Your job as a parent is to notice what they are attracted to and give them your support in pursuing their interests, even as these interests shift and change, until they find their passions. When they find their passions, these are the areas where they will be gifted if allowed to explore and develope their intellect and curiosities to fulfillment. You will also find that they are self motivated and driven in these areas. A key to success.

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Educators today, recognize multiple intelligences: linguistic, logical, mathematical, musical, kinesthetic, ( like dancers and athletes), intrapersonal know themselves deeply, articulate their feelings in various forms ( like poets, painters), interpersonal (great at relating with others) , spiritual . According to The Association of the Gifted, a child is gifted when the child exhibits outstanding / extraordinary capabilities in two or more of the above intelligences. For instance a child who composes music and sketches people and buildings at age 6, or one who does math or two grades above his level and learns languages quickly.

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When the child thinks "outside the box" and understands things like wordplays, jokes and double entendres (hopefully they're clean!) at a young age. When they are creative problem solvers and have a serious thirst for knowledge.

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My two year old has her father's sense of humor..she pretends a circle is a square in the shape sorter to see if I notice.."Does this fit here? Noooo, it doesn't"..and laughs hysterically..I thought it was early for her to do this. She also has this trick where she can't quite reach the lightswitch for the kitchen, so she goes and get the box of SaranWrap and uses it as an attachment to her arm to push up the switch. I think my jaw hit the floor when she thought to do that. She amazes me everyday.

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Everyone chill, because I got this, ok?

*I* grew up as a "gifted kid", in the 70's no less. I went to "schools for the gifted", took college level courses in HS and got my BA in 3 years.

"Gifted" does not mean your child is smart. "Gifted" does not mean your child can do things before other children can do. And I know this because I went to a whole school full of "gifted kids" and now, in our 40's we still discuss "what it means to be gifted".

Being Gifted means you don't look at things the way the teachers want you to.

Being Gifted means literally "thinking outside of the box"

Being Gifted means E=mc squared, but what happens after that?

It means life as the typical person knows it is frustrating to the Gifted Kid. We learn things more quickly.

Now, there is Regular Gifted...those above the 130 IQ (and for the record, I don't give a lot of credit to the IQ test process, but we'll play with this and humor the psychologists). Then there are the folks who are between 130 and 160...the point after which they become called "Profoundly Gifted", the kind of kids who learn an entire Mozart concerto in one sitting...those are the profoundly gifted.

And then there are folks at the extreme...the WAY over 160....up into the 220's. It has been said that extreme intelligence borders on insanity. I would agree.

My life as a Gifted Kid has been fraught with obstacles (one would not normally thing such a thing). I am at the "border"....157, for whatever credit you give to that number. But "gifted" stays with you your whole life. Understanding just exactly what that means is difficult.

Did you read early? eh...that doesn't necessarily meant "gifted".

But did you extrapolate what you read and then ventured hypotheses and conjectured new ideas from it? THAT is "gifted"

Does your child seem artistically talented? Yes? But does he or she use media in an usual way or seem to know exactly how to use it in a way he or she was never taught before? THAT is "gifted"

You see what I am getting at.

Gifted is both a blessing and a curse, but I prefer blessed.

Thank you for letting me vent.

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You are right...a blessing and a curse is so true. My son. Who is now 37, was tested as part of a group for a Uni project. I knew he was smart, he questioned everything. My Mum was profoundly gifted too. She recognized the signs early. He spent his entire school life dumbing himself down just to be accepted. He wants his profoundly gifted kids to be who they are meant to be. Just recently I heard from a cousin who I hadn't seen omspoken to in 35 years. My Mums youngest sibling. Of the six cousins, 5 are profoundly gifted, I highly,gifted. They all have children now, and one or two of each of their kids is also profoundly gifted too. All of these kids have have had problems socializing, having friendships . As a parent, you want your kids to fit in, have fun, work hard etc etc. not so easy for gifted kids. Their out of the box thinking, problem solving, interests, makes them a target for bullies. The original question posed here was to help a mum get help for her child. If, because we parents and grandparents seem to others that we brag about our children.....boy have you got it wrong. We know our kids, we know what they are capable of. Their strengths and weaknesses. To all those scoffers on here.....the grass is not always greener on the other side. Most gifted kids just want to be normal, have friends and have fun, but they are the future.....they are the bright minds that will invent, solve and succeed where others don't. You should be grateful that there are gifted kids. To us, they are family and we will love, support and nurture them whether they are super intelligent or not. Oh, btw.....one of my super gifted grandchildren is also ASD. So in most peeps eyes autism kids are stupid. Not true. But that's a whole other issue.. Moon, this is not directed at you in anyway. Just chose your comment at random to respond to all the negative people on here.

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wow...seriously how boring it is to hear about all these children being so damn smart....who really cares what your son or daughter can do at age three?? Why do you want to know if your child is gifted? To make you feel better..somehow higher than other families?? Next topic please.....

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Wow...not nice.

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When they drive you crazy. I,mother of 7, have 2 children who are gifted-now college age. And I am a veteran teacher of 25 years. Having recently taken a course in exceptional children at I.S.U.- wish I knew what I know now back when my children were younger. But I can tell you that both children from a very young age-questioned everything,sought answers to thing beyond their years,thought about some things differently than their peers. Both were over achievers in school. Bith were tested young and both were in gifted programs from the time they were five. My daughter read by the time she was four at a 1st-2nd grade level. Taught herself to play chess by watching others play also at age 4. She was taking high school credit classes while still in elementary school. but the downside is they don't take no for an answer,try to talk their way out of things,a often have authority issues. This makes school challenging. My son understood negative numbers and trig in 2 nd grade. But they are amazing individuals and I look forward to seeing what they do after college.

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This sounds like my kids! (Ages 6 and 2). When they are bored they are bad. As a parent, you must work hard to keep them challenged. On the bad days, I try to remind myself I am blessed. I could have dim-witted but compliant children!!

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My son has a very special gift... he can work my nerves like no one else!!!

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I think both my boys are smart (of course), but the attitude is a great indicator of a tendency toward success. My oldest son is a perfectionist, does things "right" and is a bit uptight right now (almost 4). My second son (almost 2) was born 3 weeks "late" and does everything "early". He is a morning person while my oldest is a night owl. I think the attitude that he has naturally (and I want to assume for myself as well) is to expect the best. He loves to wake up because he's exited about the day. He expects to enjoy himself, so he does. He loves to laugh, so he laughs at whatever. He expects to climb that big rock that brother did, so he gets a lot of bloody lips but oh well after a few moments of crying he's got to find his shoes and get back up there. He thinks he can talk and play and color and hop as well as brother (and Mom and Dad), so he does pretty well. He likes to say "I can!" and "I'm good at ___." And he seems to do it all effortlessly. I wouldn't label either of them "gifted" or not gifted at such a young age, but they sure are gifts to me. Their different gifts and personalities are the spice of my life. :)

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wow, really disgusted at the outcome of negative comments about this subject! We are talking about children first of all so there is no reason to get annoyed at someones comment for talking about a smart kid. There seems to be some resentment or aggression. What if the topic had been the opposite???? This is a page to help each other not bring each othe down and criticize.

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You know your child is gifted. It is quite obivious! No one has to confirm it. When you are around average children and then see a gifted child, the differences are remarkable! You just know, I promise!

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Children are "people" and everyone is "gifted" in one or more area's, and require support and encouragement in various aspects of our life.
What I sincerly hope is that more parents provide opportunities for growth and advancement in areas there children may not be gifted. This helps build strong and well rounded little people, who one day grow up to be big people.

I think the most "gifted" children and parents are modest and humble and understand that although they may have amazing talents, they still have so much to learn and that it is a life long endeavour.

I'll have you know, some of the most "gifted" children I have ever met where Children with various degree's of Autism. I once worked with a child that would tell you he was "Artistic", a beautiful way of looking at his amazing gifts. That child in particular , despite what many of his teachers believed, is going to be an amazing person who will invent something life changing one day.

So it isnt the child who has a sound understanding of how the world "turns" and why, or a child who spoke well before his/her peers, its not a child who asks all the questions and knows all the answers, but instead , a gifted child is one who can make anyone smile, who loves unconditionally, who can express emotion (saddness, anger, happiness), a child who believes the world is full of endless opportunities.

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Well put.

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Just saw an article on this. Here is the link: http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/parenting/10-signs-your-child-may-be-gifted-2500544/

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I like to think my daughter is gifted, but she's only 2. She loves to sing and dance, and when I say she sang before she could talk, and danced before she could walk, I am not exaggerating. However, I was considered gifted as a child. I tested well, and my scores were high. I went to the gifted and talented program when it was available in the schools I was enrolled in, and I did very well in school and college. However, it really did not help me later in life at all. I think because everything came so easily to me at an early age, I thought it would always be like that, and the wake up call that nobody cared how smart I was when I had my first menial jobs was a little tough to swallow. My family always bragged about my accomplishments, and told me I was special, and perhaps I was an early achiever (I was enrolled and taking college classes at 12 and it was instilled in me very early on that I was supposedly smarter and a higher achiever than my peers.) However, I will assert that later in life so many of my peers went on to do much more spectacular things than I have, and that perhaps emphasizing being gifted to your child is not the wisest move to make. I want my child to feel special and let her know how smart we think she is, but to emphasize that she is in any way different, or smarter than her peers should be avoided, because it really doesn't matter. Learning good coping skills, learning to be kind, thoughtful, considerate and hardworking are all values I want to focus on more than her being "smart, gifted, or talented."

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Being intellectually gifted is no guarantee of success in life. The person that achieves greater success is often the intelligent non-genius (IQ = 120-130) with a great work ethic and strong social skills. My husband and I were both considered gifted children and tests show our IQ's fall into that range. Academics came easily to me, social skills not so much. I may have graduated at the top of the class and had a decent work ethic, but I was late to mature socially and had zero self-confidence, a condition that has dogged me much of my adult life. My husband would qualify as profoundly gifted, yet barely graduated from high school. Why? He aced the tests, but refused to do homework, write papers, etc. He ended up enlisting in the military after high school at the tail end of the Vietnam War. Life as a private first-class was a huge wake-up call for him -- being forced to salute and say "yes, sir" to people with 40 fewer IQ points was pretty hard to swallow. He started an extension program while in the service and worked toward his bachelors one course at a time, though testing out of his entire freshman year and part of his sophomore year. He is both educated and successful now, but occasionally rues his late teens as time wasted by a foolish young man.

Our daughter, who is adopted, is not intellectually gifted. (I note here that I've found adoptive parents a lot less concerned about giftedness than biological parents. I guess it's because the child is not a reflection of our genetic makeup.) She's plenty smart and makes top grades, but testing shows a sub-genius IQ. However, she's articulate, knows how to work and is good at reading and understanding people. She'll go far. She may be gifted artistically and athletically. I don't know enough to say. I know that her art teachers have always said she's quite talented, and that she's the kid that gets the solos in the dance troupe to which she belongs. I think it probably takes more than that to be the next Picasso or Isadora Duncan. The main thing is that those pursuits give her pleasure and make our corner of the world a little more beautiful.

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This is a little bit of a sore subject with gifted parents sometimes. Of course all children are special, but in school the term "gifted" refers to educationally gifted, which has specific criteria. I'm not sure if we can post links, but a great stop for gifted information is the Hoagie's web site at http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/ . I have two children that test as gifted, and one that is 2E (twice exceptional), which is what they call children who are gifted but have another issue or learning disability (in our case ADHD). The 2E child, my son, actually tests as exceptionally gifted (there are different ranges of "giftedness"). Often gifted children aren't those children whose parents go around bragging about them and how smart they are. Gifted children often have so many issues, and although being "gifted" is a blessing, it's also a curse. A friend who also has a child with an extremely high IQ was talked to extensively when he was in PRESCHOOL about the dangers of perfectionism and the higher instances of suicide as he grows up. When my own daughter was younger it was torturous for her to do her homework because she just couldn't stand all the repetition required in the classroom. I'm referring to homework that would take hours when it should have taken 30 minutes accompanied by long heartbreaking crying sessions, all because she couldn't bring herself to write her spelling words in different colors of crayons because she already knew them and it was "baby work". She wasn't allowed to pre-test, and the school wasn't supportive. You can tell her something one time and she's got it. Now that she's older she can handle it better. My younger son has been through extensive outside-the-school testing twice, the first time in first grade. He had an extremely high activity level (almost off the charts but not yet ADHD, although that would develop later), but to complicate matters he wasn't being challenged in class. One example that I remember is his teacher telling me that she'd give every student a chance to tell her a word that began with the letter of the week, which she would then write on the board. She told me that she always had to get out a dictionary to look up my son's words (I remember one week it was "metaphorically"). When he was in elementary school I would tell everyone every year that if he wasn't challenged, he was going to be a discipline problem every time...a bored child in the classroom is not an enjoyable child to be around. My daughter's 5th grade teacher told me one time that she still uses my daughter as an example of giftedness at conferences...that my daughter might have been reading a book, while drawing a picture, while occasionally staring out the window, all at the same time, but that if she was called on to answer a question, she'd know the answer every time. Can you see the difficulty of teaching children like this? Now that my son is older, his lack of social skills is really showing, and the ADHD is more clear. Think Sheldon on "Big Bang Theory". That's my sixth grade son. He literally doesn't see how things that he says are rude, argumentative, etc. Everything has to have an explanation or logical order. I could go on and on (and on...and on...). My children are a joy, creative, imaginative, smart,...I can brag as much as the next mom! But their school experiences have been difficult, to say the least. It just something all the time...

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Well said...I have deliberately not worked with my daughter on reading or math or any other subject so that she won't be bored when it's taught in class. She "gets" it the first time, after that, it's boring. I could have had her reading very early but I didn't because of that. Last year in kindergarten, she complained during the first two week so of school that "Kindergarten is just a repeat of pre-school mommy." So, I prepared her before school started this year that for the first couple of week, her teacher will be reviewing things from last year so she was okay with it. I like how you described your daughter reading a book, drawing a picture and looking out the window and being able to answer a question. My daughter can do the same thing. She can recall things from when she was 2 and 3 years old with amazing accuracy and details. She can recite conversations, word for word when you had no idea she was even paying attention. I have to be very careful what I say around her and have warned her teachers and daycare staff that she is paying attention even if you think she's not. Her therapist (behavior) actually said after two meeting with her, "She's very intelligent, maybe too smart", meaning...she can out think me. I find it exhausting. I have often said I wish she were just more like my 24 year old son. He struggled some with school, but didn't leave me mentally exhausted 24 hours a day.

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Hi everyone...currently I'm doing a research on parenting a young intellectual gifted child. "What are parents perspectives and experiences of parenting young intellectual gifted". I did my study with four families with gifted children. One question came up during my interview, with one parent asked me "If you talk about your child, its just talking...if I talk is it bragging?". I read the comments here, some parents are willing to share their experience by participating in this forum by answering the question "How can you tell if a child is gifted?" This question is actually for those parents who feel their child is gifted. It can be for parents who have assessed their child formally and the results clearly stated their child is indeed gifted in some areas or maybe in all. As for some other parents the word 'gifted' means in general all children are born gifted but they differ with various abilities and talents. But one thing is clear with this question is...do you think your child is gifted? If yes, how do you define those giftedness for us to understand or why your child is different from mine, can you further explain? Obviously, there is no room for parents to compare "how can you tell your child is BETTER than mine"?. Every parents have their own way of parenting...parenting any child is a challenge but parenting a gifted child adds more challenges and can create problems that are different from those of other parents. one thing need to be taken into consideration here, that is gifted parents had to learn to cope with the dissonance between their image of a 'normal' or 'average' child and their own child. parents of gifted children often have few settings to share their experience with their gifted child and their concerns about rearing a gifted child. Sometimes they hardly can talk to other parents freely or even with friends or family members about their concerns because people who do not have 'gifted' children have difficulty understanding or even believing what these parents are talking or telling about their child. If they want to share...the feedback would be 'STOP BRAGGING'. This forum is for sharing not for comparing what your child can do and what mine does...this is about sharing the parenting journey. Sometimes parenting is like riding on a roller coaster, sometimes joyful sometimes painful...all parents need support, do support each other and share your concern. For those who do not know the definition of giftedness..please do some research and homework so that you know what you have commented is actually painful for those who have gone through hardship in parenting their gifted children. God bless all.

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Well said! There have been so many comments here that clearly shown no understanding of what defines a "gifted child". We are NOT all gifted. We are all good at different things, but that doesnt make us gifted at those things. And yes, we are all special and unique snowflakes, but being gifted does not make a child better, or their life easier, or their future more likely to be successful. Underachievement is extremely high among gifted people (myself and my husband included). As is perfectionism, depression and high levels of anxiety. Being truly gifted (assessed properly and stamped on forehead) is not the blessing or the reason to brag that many here seem to think. My 6yo son is now undergoing the testing and we have seen him struggle with how differently his brain works to other kids his age. It can be distressing, result in behavioural difficulties and low self esteem. There is a reason it is considered "special needs".

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I knew my son was gifted when he was three years old. He explained as we were driving down the road that it was better for an animal to die in the woods where it would decompose and fertilize the plants. He felt when animals die on the road it was a waste. lol Also when his aunt told him a sweet story about the moon and sun sleeps when it is night or day and he later told her she lied to him and he explained about the earth turning to her and how night and day really happens that I knew. He also constantly asked questions. At 3 I had to start getting books that I could look up the answers. He didn't want a simple answer. I do not know how old your child is, but you can have them tested when they start school.

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You just described my 6 year old daughter. I had to buy an anatomy book (childs level) when she was 4 because of her constant questions about the human body and it's organs. Her pediatrician started calling her Dr. Keira after Keira took the model of the human ear that was in the exam room and explained all the parts and names of the ear to her. Her Dr. lets her use the stethoscope to listen to both of their hearts each time we are there. The questions she asks at times drive me insane and one time I looked at her after being bombarded by them and said, "I am 47 years old and I have never in my life even thought about some of the things you ask me." I would add that she does have behavior issues, has ADHD and is going to be evaluated for ODD. She has been suspened from daycare more times than I care to mention for aggression, and was sent to the office on her 2nd day of kindergarten last year. This year has been much better and so far she has only been in trouble for talking. Her social skills are improving all the time and she is in counseling and has worked one on one with a behavior specialist at school and daycare. I will be writing soon to request taht she be tested for the gifted program at school this year as several of her teachers and the principal has suggested that she needs the extra challenge it could provide. She gets in trouble when she's bored. I wish some people weren't so quick to get defensive and say that parents are bragging. I have a 24 year old son of average intelligence who could have done better than he did in school, but he wouldn't apply himself as much as he could have. He's happily married, works full time and just had a baby girl. I'm no stranger to parenthood and had nearly 18 years of experience behind me when my daughter came along later in life so I know what I'm comparing her intelligence and personlitly too. I know of a few other parents who have gifted children and they are afraid to say anything because of the negative attitudes of many. All they want is an opportunity to yes..."brag" about their child just as any other parent wants to, but people are just way to competitive when it comes to kids. I'm finding that this is even more so this time around.

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I am so disappointed right now. I saw this question & thought that I was actually going to find some good advice. Instead all I found were a bunch of petty people accusing others of bragging. I thought that I would find supportive people debating getting your child tested & ideas for finding the right school fit so that these children don't get bored & act out. Ideas to help foster a constructive learning environment from other parents who have gone through this. I thought that that was what this website was about. I won't waste my time here again.

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Look a bit further in and just ignore some of those comments at the top (those that have been voted on most seem to be the more negative and are at the top). There are actually some great comments and good advice further on.

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I have two children. One was gifted and one was a good student . The gifted child could read a newspaper at age 4 and have an intelligent conversation with an adult about the sports section. He was an excellent student and learned to keyboard in first grade.as part of the gifted and talented program. What made him stand out was that he was and excellent student in all academic areas , and also athletically and artistically. He self taught himself to play guitar and sings at weddings and for church. I did not have to ask , Is he gifted? The teachers came to me and told me . I took a class on it once and what I was told was that if their giftedness is just in a certain area, that is a talent. But when they are just as good in sciences and math as they are in Reading, English, Writing skills etc. It is a sign that they are truly "gifted". i could also drive into the mountains , spin him in a circle, with no sun light and he would know what direction he was facing. It was like he had automatic directions as a preschooler.

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Gifted children can be very different and can be gifted in one area, but not in all areas of learning.
In my teacher/ parent experiences, the gifted can skip many steps to an understanding of something. They often are impatient and want to grab the knowledge. Most children learn in small increments, but gifted children often jump and seem to "know" things easily. I am a retired teacher and parent of two very different children. Our son was gifted early on, but he did not talk until later. When he did, he spoke in complete sentences. Many are gifted in math, but not in other subjects. If I were a parent today, I would forget about the label, and expose children to wonderful experiences, and talk to them, encourage their individual gifts as much as you can, and be positive. Enjoy them!

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Both my children are highly gifted and to tell you the truth it is no fun (well sometimes). My son has been a brilliantly enormous challenge his whole life (pun intended). He is 15 and driving us crazy. If he does work in school (seldom) he mostly aces it. Most of the time he doesn't do it and receives F's. He barely gets through school at all. We have tried everything...literally. My daughter (13) on the other hand skipped a grade and flies through with all A's. My advice is to find out if your children are gifted (there are early signs and you probably are in a school district that will pay for the testing) and start seeking some academic freedom to help your child navigate through the 'system' of school. Treat this in the same way that you would research and find ways to help a child on the other end of the spectrum. Schools are not set up to help a highly gifted child. It was suggested to me by school officials to 'sue' the system and that they had been 'waiting for a parent like me" to sue. Talk about 'no child left behind'. We are in the top 10 largest school systems in the country.We are left behind, so the negative bragging comments are from people not in-the-know (pun intended).

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Thank you for your comment. I have a 13 year old that has recently been tested and found that he is highly gifted in addition to Inattentive ADHD and Academic Underachievement Disorder. My son scores in the 99.9% in testing, has already taken the ACT and SAT and done very well. During his psychological testing, he was found to test as someone that had 6-8 years of college, depending on the subject. Yet, he is failing most of his classes. He has shared with me for some time that he is bored and has known his 7th grade "work" since 4th grade. It has been very difficult to get any assistance from the school system for additional and challenging work, when he is failing his classes, mainly due to not completing homework and often "in class" work as well. I have always known that my son "did well" and seemed "advanced" in his intellect. I thought I was a proud mother and having him tested never entered my mind. My son should have been tested years ago. I could have used the information regarding him being gifted as well as the diagnosis of ADHD/AUD. I feel that if I had this information in his younger years, that I would be so much further in the game in assisting my son to maximize his abilities and learning to work through his disabilities. The past several years have been a struggle and have gotten progressively worse. I pray that with the recent test results and additional education, on my part, I will be able to help my son (and our family) get through this. I am very proud of both of my children and I do agree that all children are special. However, please educated yourself in regards to your children, whether they are gifted, have learning disabilities or whatever the situation may be. Being informed is the best tool to assist your child/children in being able to have a successful and fulfilling life. Thanks to all, for your postings.

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As far as I can see this discussion is supposed be here to help parents who have thought that perhaps their child is gifted. So, if that is not you, perhaps you should not read these as you may feel that some people are 'bragging'. However, you may like to know why it is important for the child for their carer to be aware of their 'giftedness':

Gifted children need learning opportunities which are matched, not only to the pace of their learning (although that is very necessary), but also to the way in which they learn. Often Gifted Children's ability can be masked by their behaviour, by dyslexia or other learning disabilities which surprisingly often come hand in hand with Giftedness. It is beneficial for the child and teachers to be aware of their actual abilities and ways of learning so that they do not fall between the gaps or become a behaviour problem.


For people are are interested in finding out how you can tell if a child is gifted -

Many people (including those labeled as gifted and the parents of these children) don't really like the word "gifted". However, it is the accepted term internationally, and because of the importance of networking internationally with researchers and educators to keep up to date we feel obliged to use that term too.
Quite simply, it means someone who has truly exceptional ability in one or more fields of human understanding and endeavour.
It applies whether or not that person is actually using their ability successfully at the present time. Of course, with children, our task is to try to ensure that they can and that ultimately they do.

In their areas of ability, gifted children respond more intensively than other childen. They stay focussed much longer, observe in more detail, ask more searching questions, see finer shades of meaning, build up larger vocabularies, grasp underlying principles more quickly, explore more widely, think more originally, see more possibilities. You may already have noticed these kinds of responses in your child.

There are many traits which can be used to help identify gifted children however these are often at opposites ends of the continuum e.g. some gifted children are born with strong leadership skills and are respected by their peers, other gifted children are often the exact opposite and are so different from their peers that they have few or no friends. Some sleep very very little and others seem to need more sleep than most. So, there is quite an involved assesessment process which takes into account all these behaviours as well as cognitive ability (not IQ scores as they measure only part of intelligence).
I would suggest doing what you think is best for your child. Have them assessed if you think they may be gifted and this is not being catered for, pass on the information and recomendations to your child's teacher and be your child's loudest cheerleader. This does not mean bragging to other parents, they need not know. If you find from the assessment that your child is not 'gifted' that is not a waste of time because you will still have found out more about your child's strengths and weaknesses.

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And further more, 'Gifted' is a term used for these particular children. This does not take away from the fact that all children have gifts - as other people have mentioned. And.... being gifted is not necessarily something parents want for their children, as one 'gifted' person has commented - it can mean life is a struggle because you see things so differently. I am pretty sure there is a scary statistic for the number of suicides by the exceptionally intelligent. If THIS isn't a good reason to help cater to your child's needs/differences, than what is?

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I agree with Sylvana's comment: any child that thinks "OUTSIDE THE BOX" is a unique child and 99% of the time that child will go far in life. However, in my eyes every child is also unique and capable of doing incredible things in their own ways :)

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My gifted son had 11 word sentences at 18 months. He walked at 8.5 months. He built his first computer program at 11 years old. Now at 30 He runs an IT dept at a nationwide company and is in a Kansas city group of invited "top 10 programmers" in the city. He never went to college.

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all three of mine are gifted in very different ways...

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I have to say that I have always thought of Circle of Moms as a forum for us to support each other in caring for our children. I was very disappointed to see many of the cruel comments that were posted. No one would make such comments if a mother inquired about her child with Downs Syndrome or some other special need. Intellectually gifted children come with their own set of challenges for both themselves and the parents who love them.

I would suggest that you check out the website for an organization called SENG which stands for Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted. Also, there are books for both you and your child to aid in understanding their needs and your own challenge as a parent.

Hang in there! It gets easier with time.

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Everyone is attacking this question and to me its not about bragging but how to tell if your child is gifted. I think its normal for my child who just turned two to recogonize letters, be able to say the alphabet, count to 10, name most of her body parts, speak clearly in short 4-6 word sentance, etc etc.... I am suprised when people tell me she is gifted or highly intelligent. I am not trying to brag I am simply stating a fact that Im not sure if someone is blowing smoke up my a*% or not.some times you just need to know how to tell.

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I have two boys one is 4 and the youngest is 3. My 3 yr old has gave me signs of being more advanced even in speech, he can talk and utilize terms that are too complicated for a child his age, he knows numbers colors and some letters already. He recognizes signs in the street for buildings or local businesses. Either he is very good at observation and memory, or is he over stimulated by his brother? I dont know but I believe as a parent we need to follow the child flow and see what kind of talent he has and enjoys more.

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Seriously guys? Your kids are gifted if they can think outside of the box, or can put puzzles together? That doesn't constitute your child as being "gifted"... please. I feel that ALL kids are awesome in their own way, but parents need to stop overly bragging about their kids abillities... it annoys the rest of us who are more focused on good parenting and schooling. If you think your child is gifted and can say that "animals decompose in the woods so we should eat them"... why then throw them in a program which will enhance their abilities, but don't go bragging to other parents about it... its incredibly rude and only makes you look insecure. If your kid is that gifted, it will show in their presence... you don't have to brag for them. Kids are kids, let them be that way.

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well said Annie..I agree that kids should just be left to enjoy their childhood instead of parents putting them through tests and pushing them to achieve, achieve, achieve!!

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This is to all the Bitter comments I have read in here about his subject....Why read this article if you think it's rubbish? No one needed you to make harsh comments about this. You didn't even need to read it in the first place. Simply go to another article that you can relate to and leave the snide remarks to yourself. And to all the people in here that have a gifted child or Grand child 'Bravo' don't it make you feel great? I know it does me.

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but Melissa thats the part I detest...it makes you all feel great having gifted children and that sounds like you are showing your kid up as some kind of trophy!

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we just had a gut feeling that our 7 yr old was bored in school, kept asking us to explain concepts that were beyond her grade level, loved higher level math "tricks" like multiplication in kinder, etc...we pulled her from private school, put her into the public school system with more resources, had her tested, & she was placed into our gifted/ talented school that runs 2nd - 6th...so happy we decided to do it! Even if she didn't test to "gifted" status, we felt the public school system had so much more to offer different levels of kids, both upper & lower...just my opinion.

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My son started playing educational games on the computer very young, I thought it was normal until we realized at 18 months he was completing geometry & fractions correctly. He's in 7th grade now and his grades don't show his potential. I feel this is because things were too easy in elementary so he lost interest and never learned to study or apply himself. Those are hard things to teach to a now teenager. If you think your child is gifted, then they probably are; push them to excel ...trust your gut instinct. At 2 1/2 our daughter reprogrammed our TV & preset the timer for her favorite shows, at that point my husband and I knew we were in for trouble ( we didn't know how to work that option, she figured it out and then had to reprogram it back for us). She's 6 now & we learned to keep her busy and challenged at all times, hoping she won't get bored & lose interest like her big brother. Luckily, they are both great kids & seem to stay out of trouble, but we know boredom can lead kids down the wrong path so we are constantly on the lookout. Good luck !

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It is not all easy being the parent of a "gifted" kid. we all want our children to fulfitl their potential but if a "gifted" kid is just left alone they certainly won't. I found when my daughter was ina program over 30 years ago I learnt so much from the support of other parents, as well as I realised all my "problems" were the same as theirs. I found to I made mistakes as she was my first expecting my other kids to be at her level. she read really well at 3 and I didn't teach her. She was borrowing encyclopedias from the library at 4. She had worked out the facts of life at 4 from reading a book she found in th book shelf and understood it was something we were doing. I had not realised I needed to put all this information out of reach of a 4 year old and that she would comprehend it. In my experience the gifted kids often don't do as well through school as the very bright. I remember my daughters Grade 2 teacher saying it was easier to teach the girl with downs in her class than my daughter. I didn't want her "hot housed" so she went though school with her peers who she still relates to well. I don't think I ever saw he study and she got pretty used to things being "easy" for her. She just read stuff once and remembered it. She never seemed to have to work to achieve what she wanted academically. She could play mastermind at 3 and beat me and various other games like that. I don't think it was all because I wanted to brag about her. My other girls were so much easier and have done very well with themselves. They had to work for their grades and that has stood them in good stead.
Don't knock mothers of "gifted" kids. we do our best and we try to tackle it the best way we know and it is easier if diagnosed earlier. Anyone with a "gifted" kid I hope there is so much more info out there than there used to be. I am relieved that I only had one out of 3 as they are I guess a "special needs" kid really.

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Maybe the question is worded badly. Maybe we should be asking "how do I maximize the talents and gifts that every child has?" Some gifted children do poorly in life because no one taught them how to cope in areas where they are not gifted. Some gifted children are never recognized as such but are just seen as problem children. Some very average children go on to achieve amazing things because they were given the opportunities to do so. I read a book called "Outliers" , which sheds some light on why some average people achieve great things and why some gifted people offer nothing back to the world. I think it is the question here that is at fault, not the comments.

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How can there be so many gifted children - I have never heard so much nonsense. If my child is doing well at school that's great, if they get bad marks it is just cos they are bored can't possibly be that they haven't comprehended the subject or just didn't study. Wake up everyone.

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I am sure that there are perents out there who have kids who are lazy and average who don't try. Then ol' mom there says "He is so bored with his classes! That is why... blah, blah..." But the truth is that there ARE gifted kids who flunk because they are bored to tears. And there are gifted kids constantly in trouble because they act up out of a need to be challenged. there are often other challenges too: ADHD, dyslexia and OCD. This comment shows that your experience with truly gifted kids is limited if not non-existent. Those of us who have seen or experienced this KNOW what it is like to sit in your seat and actually cry because you have been given the same worksheet for the third time, you got it perfect twice and the teacher STILL makes you do it ...again... After going through this day after day, lots of gifted kids just give up.

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If you feel like your child may be gifted, then it is important to have him or her tested. Having a gifted child is good, but recognizing them and having them tested is important for his/her school work. A gifted child may be over looked because he or she gets lower grades in school. Not because they are dumb, but because they are bored and not properly challenged. My gifted child was tested, and come to find out that, in second grade, he tested out between the 4th-6th levels in concepts of all studies. When his school district changed his cirriculum, from average to more depth of his studies, his grade went from c's to a's. If your child can explain concepts that are far beyond what he or she is learning in school, or knows things no other kids his or her own age group does, you might want to have him tested.

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Every child is gifted in some form. As a mother of 4, each 1 has their own "gifts", whether it be more artistic, intellectually, socially, even spiritually. My job as their mother is to continually challenge them to be even better and utilize those gifts in every day interactions. We can also work on areas that they are not particularly strong in, (say socially, for one of my kids). Although each child may not have the "whole" package, none is loved any more than the other.

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Do we really need to put another label on our kids?
Seems to me that parents of 'gifted' children often need to brag and labor their child due to their OWN shortcomings. Just sayin'

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*LABEL darn auto correct

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Giftedness runs in my family. With my son, his speech patterns developed very early . Words came at an early,age, sentences began at 1 year, by 18 months he was using long and logical sentences of many words and using reasoning skils, could remember books word for word and if you missed a word, he would tell you which one. By 2 he had figured out how to play Amazing Grace on a toy organ and make it sound like the bagpipes. At 3 he was assessed with an IQ of 166. Started school and showed how smart he was, got bored with all the repetition and became the class clown and dumbed himself down because his"smarts" drew too much attention to himself.
School was boring, frustrating and no,challenge to,him. He is 37 now, got a couple of degrees and has his own consultancy business, builds computers, manages tech side of call centers...mostly self trained. Both my Grandchildren are profoundly gifted. Both could read well before starting school. Every child will show a different way.

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If they can put puzzles together at a young age. If they can look at a group of something and say there are two or three or four of something without counting them out first. If they can sort things out. If they can identify a pattern. And the most important is if they can follow directions. My youngest at the age of two impressed her ECFE teachers with these abilities. By kindergarten she was reading. By first grade she could tell me how much change I would get back at a store if I used a $20 bill. This is both a blessing and a curse. She cried every morning about going to school...she was so bored. Finally I had a meeting with the school and we got her extra work to do because she was literally finishing her math work in three minutes while the rest of the class took 15-20. She has been in the high potential classes all the way through school. She is now in 7th grade in all the advanced classes. She tests in the top 97% of the state.

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A gifted child excels in what she does without her parents urging or pushing her to do so. For example, she represented her school in the state Geography Bee, and she had consistently high grades throughout her school years in an excelling school. A child is gifted when she is not only on the top of academics, but also she excels in extracurricular activities such as cheerleading, band, choir, girl scouts, and youth group activities. Above all, a child still has plenty of time to enjoy weekends with her friends, without neglecting household chores, such as laundry and ironing.

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I think the only way to really know is to pay a psychologist a lot of money to do the testing. And most of the time, there's no reason to do that. It doesn't really matter for most kids. We do know the IQ of our two oldest children (it's been checked when they took part in research studies). It's well into the gifted range, but knowing they're gifted didn't really change anything for us. I was very surprised to find out that they have essentially the same IQ however, because they are such incredibly different children. It really goes to show that IQ is a very tiny part of who you are. What kids need in terms of parenting and support has very little to do with their IQ. It has a lot more to do with supporting their emotional and psychological growth and development.

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