How do you decorate a shared room for opposite sex siblings?

13  Answers

11 24

half the room is toy story for my son and there is a line down the middle where the other half is stars and moons for my daughter. each side has their own furniture and their own window

1
0 0

I love to use similar fabrics or patterns but in different colorways. Picture a room painted apple green. Brother can use apple green and robin's egg blue, while Sister can enjoy the classic "pink and green." It's a "win-win," and that simple differentiation is often sufficient to satisfy younger children! As children grow older, though, creating some type of individual space is important.

tracizeller.com/blog/2012/should-twins-share-a-bedroom/

0
0 0

This question is near and dear to my heart since my 6-year old daughter and 4-year old son share a room. I tried to create a space that both would find fun, inspiring and still remain personal for each of them. First, choose a color palette that can be a neutral like black and white or yellow and gray. You can then add gender specific colors with the accessories like wall decor, patterned or monogrammed pillows, storage bins and even fun toys or books to define each genders part of the room. Or why not create custom art for each child, like silhouettes in their favorite colors and hang them next to each other. Every time they look at them, they will know they are represented in the room.

http://projectnursery.com/projects/boy-and-girl-shared-yellow-and-gray-room/

0
0 0

I have boy/girl twins that share and room and started by going with a sage green wall color with a plan to create custom headboards (an easy diy) to personalize each sides of their space. Pulling in some pinks and blues on the girl side of the room and other greens and blues for the boy side of the room. To keep the cohesiveness of the space I stuck with solid light blue comforters. That balanced out the fact that my daughter had floral headboard and my son had striped headboard. To keep it simple start with an over all neutral wall color an add some individual personality with a custom headboard that pulls in coordinating colors or with fun throw pillows and lamps.

http://www.goodgirlgoneglad.com/diy-upholstered-headboard/

0
0 36

When my daughter and youngest son were 5 and 2, respectively, they had to share a room for a couple of years. I chose to go with a color scheme that would be suitable for either gender: celery green walls with white trim, and red gingham bedding. My daughter used a wrought iron daybed with a white bedskirt, and my son was still in a crib, with a red and white gingham bumper and skirt. For accent decor I chose vintage signs and wall art that incorporated my main colors, without being too 'matchy-matchy.' Both kids loved their new room when it was finished.

0
0 0

Great question! When creating a shared room for a brother and sister, I would start with a neutral wall color. Then have each child indicate their favorite colors, and choose the two that are most complementary as the main accents. Use the sister's color choice in her bedding, and throw pillows, and the same for the boy's color choice for his bed. To keep the room from looking too divided in half by color, I'd use another neutral color (black, white, metallic) for the side lamps, organization bins and accessories. I'd then tie all the colors together with a coordinating rug and window treatment. Finally, to give each child a feeling of individuality and room-ownership, I'd hang large memo boards on both sides of the room for them to decorate as they please.

http://hisugarplum.blogspot.com

0
2 77

First, I would start w/ color. Ask the children their 3 color preferences then choose shades of those colors that blend well together. Either paint the walls 1 cohesive light color or 1/2 boy shade and 1/2 girl. Next, select patterns such as plaids, stripes, dots, chevron and apply those to throw pillows, drapes, bed skirts, etc. I would select bedding that is primarily solid. I would add a bean bag chair for each child as well as monograms/names to wall, pillows, bookshelves, small individual rugs next to beds and even drapes.

http://www.thediamonde.com

0
0 0

Although it may seem daunting at first, many kids rooms could easily be gender neutral. Even blue is gender neutral - especially turquoise or navy. If you choose turquoise or a sky color, you could use a beach theme or outdoor/nature theme. Accent colors such as light green, orange, and yellow would add a lot of fun and brightness. Although I prefer that the bedspreads or quilts should be matching or clearly coordinating, each could be customized with more gender-specific pillows. Regardless of sex, each child should have an area of the room which is "theirs" where they can keep their special things and play by themselves. This could be a basket of toys and a bean bag chair for a younger child, or comfy chair and a desk for an older child.

http://houseography.blogspot.com/2010/08/opposites-attract-boygirl-bedroom.html

0
0 0

Start by using gender neutral color combinations such as orange and white w/ blues, or red and tans, combinations of darker/lighter greens and white. Using the color combinations, the children can then interject their personalities with: bedding, bulletin boards w/pictures and memorabilia, lamps, banners, toys, hobby items, stuffed animals etc.
Color is the key - it will make the room feel cohesive!

http://pineconeplace.blogspot.com/

0
0 0

Great question! Just last month I transformed a closet into a playroom for my daughter and son. My goal was to create a shared space that made each child feel like an individual. I was able to stow the majority of their toys into bins placed on the Ikea Expedite bookcase. The bookcase is simple, the bins are the same, yet what is inside is what makes each child happy. Then I gave them each their own table, important for coloring and playing. Above the tables I took Ikea photo ledges and made them each their own small library. They each picked which books would be in their own library! Also, I hung Ikea dog tail hooks for them to each hang their own costumes. The hanging of costumes looks fun and festive, and affords us more space in the bins for stuff that doesn't "show well." Truly the space was unified keeping the basics neutral and allowing the gender of each to speak through their own book choices, costume choices and choices of toys inside the bins. Here's the post: http://hamptontoes.blogspot.com/2011/10/from-closet-to-playroom.html

What I did with the playroom is applicable to a bedroom that is shared by two opposite gender siblings. Take two of the same upholstered headboards, have their own monograms stitched into the textile, use the same duvet cover, yet allow each child to pick their own sheets. Or use two of the same striped duvets, yet allow each child to pick his/her own color. Create a library for each child with the photo ledges, the books each child picks will speak to him or her yet using the same ledges will pull the look together. At the end of each bed anchor the space with a table and a couple of small chairs for each child.

There are so many options, but I think the key is to create one space that is visually appealing and functional, yet allows each child to be an individual. Usually this can be easily pulled off by keeping the basics neutral and bringing the color in through the books and toys.

http://hamptontoes.blogspot.com/2011/10/from-closet-to-playroom.html

0
0 31

Keeping a neutral color scheme as a starting point is key when decorating a shared room for opposite sex siblings. Next interject accent colors for each (i.e. purple for the little girl and green for the little boy}. I also suggest that each child has their own designated space other than their bed. It could be a desk, bookshelf or dresser. Keep the furniture items the same or as similar possible to achieve a uniform look while letting the accessories reflect the kids different styles and personalities. The closet space should also be divided evenly and can be color coded {i.e. hangers, bins, etc.} in the room's accent colors.

http://www.simplifiedbee.com

0
0 0

Keeping in mind that children are territorial by nature. Make sure the room appears to have a distinct division of space. Furniture placement, area rugs, and even the color scheme allows you to cleverly create two separate, yet cohesive spaces.

http://www.blulabelbungalow.com

0
0 0

decorate in black and white- black for boys side white for girls or use neutrals with accents on each side that the child loves,use tiffany blue,orange yellow,organic creams browns.. I think pink or purple would be the only colors atht would be totally all girl.

0

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms