Pacifiers: yea or nay?

Some moms thrill to the pacifier, saying it's both a sanity saver and a comfort for their children, while other moms balk at using a pacifier. What's your take?

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32  Answers

2 0

The pacifier has been a total lifesaver for us. There are times when our son just will not calm down, even after a full nursing session (especially when its time for bed). He can't be hungry anymore, but I think he has a strong urge to suck so having something to nom on while he's falling asleep is nice. I was a serious thumb sucker as a child and had pretty bad orthodontic problems because of it, so I'm a huge advocate for the pacifier. You can throw away a paci when you're ready to wean the kid... a thumb or fingers, not so much.

5
3 37

I agree with you. My son would wake up in the middle of the night and I thought he would want to nurse, but would fall asleep as soon as he started sucking. The paci was a huge saver for me and my son slept through the night at 6 weeks because of it. To break him of the habit I just cut the nipple off and told him it was broke. He slept with for a few days, had a sippy with some water, and then was done. Much better than a thumb sucker. Can't cut the thumb off.

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0 34

I think babies have a natural strong urge to suck, and the pacifier is a huge soothing comfort for them. I think it is harsh to deny a baby that comfort just to make it easier on the parent later by not having to eventually take it away from them.

3
1 11

If it is a natural urge, it shouldn't need an artificial solution. Our bodies are very capable of providing what we need. It's not just about taking it away later, it's about what you're baby is trying to communicate and it's about what it can lead to ie. thumbsucking which can then lead to dental issues, it's about having an unnecessary crutch and hygiene because those things fall on the ground constantly and I assure you there is not a single parent who hasn't either simply wiped it off or shoved it into their own far dirtier mouth!

1 11

I think it's a Bandaid with long-term negative effects. I would rather know what's wrong with my child then pop a distraction into their mouth! My daughter didn't cry until she was 9 months old because all her needs were met.. at 9 months she realised there were creative uses for tears! She doesn't have any vices and I am glad!

2
26 32

no! i chose not to so i don't have the break the habit when they get older

2
16 9

Exactly, and it can lead to crooked teeth & thumb sucking.

9 76

My oldest never took a pacifier. I was told that it would create nipple confusion, so I was scared into not giving one to her. When she got to the teething age, we tried to give her one to sooth the pain, but she still wouldn't take one. My second daughter, however, was a sucker. She would have nursed for HOURS if I would have let her. So I had to give her a pacifier to calm her down and ease her inbetween feedings. I wasn't ever "for" or "against" the Binky ( as we call it ) but I knew that if we didn't have one, I wouldn't have to be reading all the threads on "What to do to get rid of my child's Pacifier" :) We will see with Baby #3 - Due Next month!

1
85 27

Nope, other than when my daughter was nil-by-mouth for three days... I have seen so many people that have used them (or put fingers in thier babies mouths) instead of feeding them or giving them what they need at the time and the knock on effects are huge.. my two never had any issues even close.. I just cant understand why especially breastfeeding mums interfer with the natural supply and demand element particularly in that first month.... but of course like everything else each to thier own and I have always kept an open mind that maybe the next one might need one - although I highly doubt it...

1
2,093 0

I don't begrudge moms who need them. but only use it if you need it. They can interfere with breastfeeding. They're a big pain in the butt (getting lost, getting dirty, getting broken, etc). One of our kids used a pacifier for a short time, but she only liked one style and it got discontinued.

0
21 0

With my first baby I swore I was going to be the perfect mom and use absolutely no pacifiers! I even mentioned that on our baby registry and told people they didn't need to waste their money on getting us any because our baby wasn't going to use one. Isn't it funny how reality comes and slaps us in the face? After about a month my daughter became a little colicky and once we had tried EVERYTHING to calm her down we finally caved and gave her a pacifier. She got her teeth pretty early and is now 2 years old with all of her teeth (except a set of top molars) and they are perfectly straight. We made a point to take it away once she turned a year old and to be honest she was too young to notice it. We did however let her keep one in her crib so that at nap time and bed time she could use it to fall asleep and aside from that it was out of sight out of mind. Once she turned two we took it away from her even in the crib and it was a week tops of her crying it out (which was painful to me but she really never cried longer than 20 minutes) and since then she's been totally fine without it. I do think the longer you wait to take it away the harder it will be because they will understand more and be able to ask for it. In our experience using a pacifier was a lifesaver and when we felt she was too old for it we could more easily take that away then lets say hide her fingers if she had started sucking her thumb instead.

0
195 35

I like the soother. I have offered it to all three of my kids. Only one really took to it, and we took it away when he was two. I was thankful actually that he had the soother rather than the thumb. I can take away a soother but I can never take away his thumb! lol Thumb suckers (I believe) are harder to break because it's always available. I found too, that my son just wanted to suck on something, not necessarily eat, and to keep my sanity, I couldn't be his human pacifier.

0
8 0

I am loving all the responses on this site to questions such as the one stated above. We have those "I have a perfect kid because mine does not use the pacifier. (Clap , Clap)". Unfortunately, not everyone's kid is as "perfect" as yours. I don't need to tell you if my kid uses one or not, doesn't matter to me. What matters to me is that you have respect for other peoples opinions whether you agree with them or not. Kind of like politics, religion and money.

We are all out there to love and care for them unconditionally. Babies are not a product from the same production line. Managing a baby is easy, it is understanding the baby's personality and figuring out what works best for you and your baby are the hard parts.

0
3 17

Out of 4/ 1 didn't want it; 1 needed it to be quiet when I didn't nurse; 1 I convinced they didn't want it; wouldn't let go of it. depends on the issue at hand I guess.

0
4 7

Nay. It's one of those things that parents often learn the hard way. It makes life easier for the baby who needs to suck all the time. After the age of one when they are eating real food, it's a definite no-no. It is not worth the trouble or bigger problems it causes after this age. It's easiest in the long-run to wean the baby completely off the thumb, the pacifier, the breast, the bottle, etc. all at the same time.

0
4 7

Crooked teeth are not caused by incorrect use of pacifiers or other sucking behaviors. They are due to previous generations of adults that had malnutrition issues. The best way to prevent crooked teeth and crooked joints is to prepare yourself and your partner nutritionally before breeding together. There are many herbal supplements and whole-grains that correct nutritional deficiencies that are inherited genetically. Horsetail, for example, has high levels of silica that our bodies biologically transmute into calcium. Raspberry leaf tea provides minerals that pregnancy can leach out the bones. My first daughter was given her first dental X-Ray with a grim prognosis at age of 4. She ate correctly with proper nutrition. Today at 15, she has perfectly aligned teeth because her jaw and bone structure were given vital nutrients to grow properly.

0 0

I think there a age limit to pacifiers, best to take it away early as possible, its not bad some kids find it as a security thing

0
15 1

Definitely to each their own. But if a baby is crying because she is hungry the pacifier will not stop that baby from crying unless she gets food. Babies have a natural reaction to suck and it is not always because they are hungry. the sucking reflex soothes the baby. If the baby doesn't have a pacifier they may suck their thumb. In either case the infant is learning to self sooth and that is a good thing. I am a Freud believe and believe in his oral stage. I feel a child will ween off breast feeding or the pacifier when the child is ready. As for causing crooked teeth, some children are just born with physical traits that will lead to oral issues, most pacifiers are designed now a days to fit the child's mouth so less chance of causing issues with their teeth are likely.

0
1 9

No one has mentioned that the American academy of pediatrics recommends them for prevention of SIDS. My son never took to a pacifier but I think it is fine if it provides comfort and if introduced late enough not to interfere with starting breastfeeding.

0
4 5

My husband and I didn't want to start that habit with our 1st, and when we did decide to try it because she was driving me crazy, she didn't care for it at all. Our 2nd got one in the hospital when he was on IVs for a couple days. We weren't too thrilled but he didn't seem to use it too much later. Our 3rd is 2 weeks old now and we don't even own any pacifiers and were relieved that she is super easy.

0
19 5

We tried. I had severe postnatal depression and couldn't handle it well when he was inconsolable - he just wasn't interested.

0
28 9

We used it with No1. We needed to. She was windy from day 4 till 12 weeks or so, and would cry till all hours... the dummy/pacifier really saved us. We cut the tip off just prior to 2 years and she dropped it pretty quickly.

No2 was windy also, and had other issues, but I decided I was going to attempt to go without it. She again was windy for about 8 - 10 weeks, but was a far better sleeper. A relief not to have to go through getting rid of it again!

0
2 0

We used a pacifier at night and nap times. Never throughout the day for basic comforting needs. One on one attention took care of that. When our girl was around 14 months, she started spitting out the pacifier while she was sleeping, and would cry for us to put it back in her mouth. That's when I felt she was developing too strong of a dependence on it, so we cut it out cold-turkey style. I feel like it helped her soothe herself to sleep until she learned to do it on her own. Shoving a pacifier into a kid's mouth whenever they pitch a fit is never the answer. There's usually something else they really need, one just needs the patience to figure it out.

0
2 42

since i was breastfeeding my daughter, i took a lactation consultant's advice and waited until she was about 5 weeks old to give her a pacifier. she took to it without any nipple confusion at all, and it came in handy at least a million times. then, right around 8 months, she decided she was done with it, and hasn't used one since then. there were a few times i've actually wished she'd stuck with it longer, like when she starts squawking and squealing in the middle of church or on a long road trip, but at least this way i don't have to worry about how to break her from it.

0
49 27

i use one with my little one, but one for her naps and bed time the rest of the day she is with out it. i plan on taking it away from her once shes around a 1yr old

0
16 9

I never hard ANY interest in using a pacificer for my daughter. Nor did she ever want it. I try the VERY first night we brought her home, because I was so exhausted, and she spit it right out! :D
I don't really like pacifiers, I have seen people with kids like 4 year olds using pacifiers. And then when I see a child drop it on the ground, pick it up, & put it back in their mouth; ugh, gross.

0
7 15

At first we thought the soother was an answer to our prayers with our daughter but now, its a nightmare. She has to have it everywhere with her so she keeps it on a "use it"(rope with clip) around her kneck. And if she loses it then its a huge ordeal. Plus if she cant find it then she is sucking on everything else tht will fit in her mouth. We are still working on getting rid of it for good but we are not there yet!

0
117 21

My first child had no sucking reflex...long story, but we never used a pacifier, however she would chew her wrist, at one stage actually broke the skin, but again that is another story. My second child didn't seem to require one and my third, well he had two sisters that leapt to his every command, he didn't need one either. My daughter now has two children of her own and both use a pacifier. As to whether one should offer a pacifier or not it's totally up to the parents I believe. Often if a pacifier isn't used than the child will use his/her own fingers (or even wrist, whole hand, etc). I don't believe it has any effect on teeth, I know that there is a diversity of opinion on this, but as I say, if they don't have a pacifier than likely they will suck on something else.
So, if it works for your family, then go with it, if you find them a nuisance, then go with that. Just be happy and content with your choice and let others have their own opinions...doesn't mean you have to allow them to impact your decisions...

0
344 44

there is nothing wrong with a pacifier..my parents used them for both me and my sister and i haved used them for both of my kids..to me they really are a life saver it helps my kids calm down. now i have seen children as old as four and five still using them and i absolutly disagree. my son was two when i told him that it was broken and then he threw it in the garbage all by himself and i will do the same with my daughter when she turns two.

0
1 1

I don't have strong convictions for or against pacifier use. Babies need non-nutritive sucking. Some people choose to use a paci. I think if it comforts a child, go for it. I tried to get my son to take one for a while, but he was never really attached to it, so I stopped offering it to him.

I do know some other moms whose little ones get thrush pretty frequently, and their pediatricians say that if they would cut out pacifier use it would help. I guess there are pros and cons to pacifier use, just like there are pros and cons to anything else.

0
21 16

My son who is 9 years old, never had a pacifier or sucked his fingers which was great, but he still has orthodontic problems (is going to need braces) so I don't think giving a baby a pacifier hurts. My daughter on the other hand who is 23months old now didn't use a pacifier either but had a strong want to suck things so I assisted her in finding her thumb, thinking it would be easier for her to fall back to sleep instead of searching the crib for a binkie or when you accidently forget it you don't have a melt down. However she does still suck her thumb and I am finding it difficult to break her of this habit. Either way I think it is okay for a pacifier.

0
11 0

Yea... I am totally for using a pacifier... I sucked my thumb till I was 11, I am very lucky I have no orthodontic problems, why take the risk? And I prefer paci to thumb as you can take the paci away when your child is old enough not to need to suck to sooth (you can stop thumb sucking but it is a lot harder!) We got rid of my sons before two years old, when he understood what the word "broken" meant... and I "broke" the dummy by cutting the teat off, and I will do the same for my daughter. We have a very strict rule in our house, if you have the paci, you are in your cot - to get out of bed you have to hand it over... and if you happen to find a stray one under the cot and have a sneaky suck, you go back into the cot until you hand it over. Works very well for us, both my children were very clued up on this rule, every time they wake up and I go into them, they are/were always standing there with arm out passing the paci to me to put away.

0
8 23

NO, I have a two and half year old and a nine month old. I am very proud to say they did not use a paci. Prolonged paci use and bottle use will cause the palates of the mouth to be deformed. My children were also breastfed and a paci can cause nipple confusion.

0
6 1

My daughter is a total "sucker." We warn her that when she turns three she can only use one at night just to start the weaning process. My son never liked one and uses my boobs as pacifiers. I would prefer he had a paci!

0
1 0

I love the pacifier! my baby is not too obsessed but loves to sleep with one. It is so soothing and comforting and I say let them use a pacy untill they're 16 if they really want to! They will break the habbit on their own eventually.

0
63 6

Best thing ever. I got my little girl to take one at 7weeks. I would have had to give up breastfeeding because she wanted comfort constantly. She still has one for bed now and she's two and a half. I don't think it's a bad thing and I don't plan to take it away until she's ready!

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