Would you let your child skip a grade in school?

Some parents have their kids skip a grade in school if they are ready or to help them get ahead. Would you let your child skip a grade? Why or why not?

40  Answers

1 11

No, I don't think I would. My 9 year old son is reading and doing math at least one grade level (sometimes two) above of where he is at and has been all through elementary. While the academic level is high, the emotional/social level is age-level appropriate. I think pushing him ahead of his peers would have been a horrible mistake for him and could have damaged him, socially and emotionally. I think the schools have a responsibility to the kids like this and need to do more to challenge them so they don't get bored, nurture their minds.

8
43 0

That is true in theory. But in reality, most schools and teachers don't have the desire, energy or resources to challenge and nurture kids who are ahead. My philosophy is that if they're ahead in every way, instead of making everyone else adjust, my child can adjust by moving up a grade. Now, of course, if he's not ready in every way, then the issue shouldn't even be discussed. I jumped both of my kids and haven't looked back. They would have died had they stayed in the lower grade. We get a glimpse of what life would have been like had we not jumped every summer when we try age-defined summer camps and programs. They never work out and my children have a terrible time. Some kids are just more mature and need to be with older kids. Adults aren't required to make their friend list based on their birthday, so why should children. So, we've learned. Their summer programs are always jumped up too--based on grade, rather than age.

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0 0

Unless your child is the next Doogie Hauser, skipping a grade is nothing less than an ego boost for a parent. As a teacher I have come in contact with so many parents who think their child is just so advanced and so smart and insist on pushing them ahead. Sad fact is they have no concept and little Susie or little Johnny isn't the wonder child their parents think they are. LOL to those who said their kids were reading at 4, that's way more normal than you think, call me when you're child is reading at 1 or 2 now we've got a prodigy.

Conversely the teachers who want to push these kids ahead are the teachers who lack the ability to provide an environment for these kids to thrive.

4
13 66

Most of us that have kids are gifted, were reading at age two by four they were reading developed plots and multiplying. The reason that you don't get most of those kids is because many of us have our kids either at a private school or are homeschooling them. Current data, tells us that our homeschooled kids are scoring at the 85 percentile overall and the public and private schools are only at the 50th. I do agree that teachers that do not support that environment make it easy for me at teacher veteran and parent to homeschool. The kids that do well stay homeschoolers and never set foot in the private realm. As for the wonder child, yes the parent should believe in them because if they don't-who will obviously not teachers that called me stupid because I had a learning disability growing up or, even you if you think that sarcasm is necessary when pointing out the belief the children are not all gifted. Children all have their gifts and even when it is hard to support a child they still need to developed, nurtured and expected to learn. Teachers, that have no faith in them just think they will only work at mcdonald's and not all students should go to college. Well, I did work at Burger King with my dad who managed the highest grossing Burger King before getting a degree in analytical accounting, and the two masters degrees I earned.

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7 15

I really think it would depend on the child socially, emotionally, and definitely mentally. Some children just grasp concepts faster but that doesn't mean they would be ready socially or emotionally for the heavier work load. A parents discretion goes a LONG way! They know the child best and can determine ability to adapt to the new challenges for the child.

4
13 203

I had the chance to let my child advance two grades but turned it down. I think that even though they may be educationally ahead, they still need to be kept with their peers for emotional reasons. I noticed that many of the child who are moved up in grades are emotionally damaged or crippled due to such advancement. They aren't accepted by the older crowd because they have a younger mentality due to being younger. I asked that my child be allowed to attend the classes she needed with the older children but for the rest of her schooling to remain with her own class for this reason. Hope that helps!!!!

3
1 18

I skipped Kindergarten when I was 5 and then graduated a year early. I did not miss out on any socialization, nor did I miss out on any education opportunities. Being the youngest of 7, I was already much more mature than most of my class mates and fit right in as a college freshman even at 16. I would not recommend it for everyone, however. I was also responsible for working and paying my own way which stressful and was very overwhelming. If I had to do it over again of if my children should choose the same path, I would want them to stay local for a year or two when going to college. Advancing in classes can help students who are no longer mentally stimulated because they are better suited for a higher grade curriculum. Keep in mind that the child may have difficulty fitting in if they are not socially mature.

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8 0

No! It does not help them get ahead. It doesn't do anything but force them to grow up. It also does not give them an advantage in the real world. Think of it this way, the normal high school graduate is 18 and then spends four years in college, graduating at age 22. A child who skips a grade is going to be a whole year younger. In fact, a child who has a later birthday in the year could graduate college before their 21st birthday. While it is true that older people are not as attractive to companies, no one wants to hire someone who is too young.

All of that aside, I know from personal experience that is not the best emotionally for a child. I see no reason for more advanced topics and gifted classes for the smarter children, but speeding up their pace and pushing them forward isn't the best.

2
13 66

Yes. But schools, should provide curriculum's at the instructional level they are at not by there age. For factual sake, there is ample research about on schools and just because kids are together means their social skills are better. In fact, homeschooled kids are far better off instructionally and socially-emotionally. The reasons is that the homeschooled students work at their instructionally so, their are less behavioral issues and the social situations are controlled with immediate feedback.

2
0 13

I would not. I skipped second grade as a child and I think it hurt me more than it helped me. I skipped a grade based on high IQ scores and other tests as well as being more emotionally mature than other kids my age. Everyone wanted to make sure I would be "challenged". There are plenty of ways to give your gifted and talented child other educational and intellectual enrichment without skipping them a grade. Going from being a gifted child among peers to playing catchup with older kids can be harder than you think, especially on self-esteem. I went from being able to help my friends understand things to feeling like the odd man out and feeling bad that it took me a bit longer to understand things because I didn't have the foundation of the previous year all of my classmates had.

If you are considering skipping your child a grade, please consider very carefully what your motivations are and don't do it so you can "prove" to other people (or yourself) how smart your child is by skipping them a grade. Be brutally honest with how much your pride is a factor. We are all proud of our kids when they are special, but does he or she truly and realistically "need" it? What else can you do to stimulate him/her intellectually instead? Take advantage of gifted and talented programs and advanced placement classes or community college or summer camp classes in the summer. Take an active roll outside of school to help them read more, write more, experience more.

Remeber you are probably going to be sending a newly 17 year old kid away to college someday. That extra year of maturing and guidance at home might not be a bad idea. Think about what you got introduced to your first year of college ;) See your son or daughter doing it at 17. Still want to skip a grade? lol

2
37 7

While I think that a child has to be stimulated and challenged...I don't necessarily think it is a good thing to skip a grade. It happened to me...and while the differences may have not been noticeable to everyone, there were some issues. I was playing with dolls, while most of my classmates had moved on... I still believed in Santa, and had to take MUCH ribbing because of it, in high school, the kids were driving and being able to sign themselves out...since I was just 16 when I graduated...I didn't get to do any of that..including date. (Though I was not ever boy crazy like all my older friends.) Doesn't sound like a lot...but to me??? It was hard. Always being the youngest...usually the smartest... and always being different really warped my self esteem...
So...short answer now that I have written a novel? I would NEVER allow my child to skip a grade unless they were close to graduating and there was a definitive reason for it. I would invest in tutors...extra curricular activities...anything to keep them challenged other than skipping a grade.

2
0 0

I would, without hesitation, if I felt it was in the best interest of my child. Many children won't be ready for it, because leaving behind the children that they are developmentally on the same page with is too detrimental. There are children however, truly gifted children, who are so far above their age-peers academically that they don't fit in socially regardless and will have social issues,whether they skip a grade or not. For these children the idea of being left where they are has no up-side.

Research has shown that those who skip a grade are rarely hurt in the long-term. Yes, they may have some social difficulties along the way, but really who didn't? We all had something that challenged us as children. Are you more likely to be bullied because you're small and younger or because you're a 'nerd' and always top of the class? Kids are mean if you're different either way. In my opinion it's better to keep the child intellectually stimulated, and they will find intellectual equals and social equals no matter where they go, they may just not be the same kids. (this is my friend I play barbie's with, this is my friend I play chess with.)

1
12 0

Absolutely. My boy skipped 5th grade and has landed in middle school. But there really were no other options, as the person who tested him informed us. Here in our rural community in France, that was the best solution, and so far, it seems to be working. There are some aspects about it that are very challenging, and not just for my son, but he is academically challenged, and has actually found friends. So I'm glad we made the decision.

631 96

That depends on the maturity f that child as well as established friendships in school -
There is no blanket answer ...

1
9 20

Depends on the child, but the two I have, ABSOLUTELY!

1
4 16

Yes I would... My daugther has been reading since she was 4, now she's 11 going to the 6th grade. The only reason I never did was because the teachers always challenged her. They would give her work that was harder. She is defiantely socially ready..

1
43 0

You should insist and persist. You know your child best. It's perfectly legal to jump a grade. The school and the teachers have no right to hold back your child when you feel that she's ready, assuming her test scores and citizenship grades are appropriate.

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191 0

My 4 year old will be starting kindergarten a year early this fall. He was in a preschool program at the elementary school last year with 3-5 year olds. All of his friends are 5 and will go with him. His IQ is off the chart, and he can read and do math at a 3rd grade level. He is not going to fit in anywhere, an intellectual peer would be twice his age or more. For now he has friends that are going to Kindergarten with him and they are all happy about that.

0
224 0

If your child is gifted I would opt for true and rigorous enrichment (not just extra work sheets) instead of skipping a grade. I would encourage you to think twice about having a 17 year old shipping off to college. There may or may not be social repercussions in younger years, but no matter how mature your 10 year old seems most 17 year olds are not developmentally ready for college even if they are ready academically. Most 18 year olds probably aren't developmentally ready in today's society, but that is another issue. If a child is gifted get them into a gifted program or work with the school to ensure they are getting what they need. I would work with the school to maybe put them ahead in their strongest subject but I would not skip them fully ahead. Also, seek out enrichment outside of school.

0
1

Yes

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1,904 0

I think it's very important to match a child up with their most appropriate peer group. One of our kids is extremely strong academically, but socially young and immature. We had her start school a year later. Numerous teachers have either congratulated on us on making this choice because she fits in so much better with the younger kids, or they have been completely surprised to find out how old our daughter actually is. So I totally appreciate that a child may very well be better suited to the grade above. That said though, I also think that parents need to very carefully consider what it will be like for their child is they skip ahead, especially as they get older. It can be really hard to be the youngest - everybody is learning to drive and you're still 14 or 15, you leave for college when you're only 16 or 17, etc. A bright, precocious or gifted child can be enriched at their own grade level.

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45 13

When I was a kid, I skipped kindergarten and entered into first grade a year early, so all told I was two years ahead in school. My answer is no. Absolutely not, no. I was always awkward and behind socially and didn't catch up until about the 10th grade. If I ever struggled with a subject, my teachers wouldn't take that seriously because of my gifted status, so I couldn't get the extra help I needed. Yes, gifted kids need more challenge, but they also need a normal childhood. There is no sense and no need to skip them ahead if parents are willing to challenge them at home. The benefits don't outweigh the drawbacks, in my opinion - the drawbacks that are more lasting than being awkward in elementary and middle school. Try being a 16 year old college freshman; that's a blast.

The answer is more gifted programs and more funding to them in elementary and middle school until kids get into high school and can take AP and college courses. Push your districts for the gifted education programs; don't damage your kids by skipping them ahead so you have something to brag about to your fellow mommies over wine.

Oh, and as a cautionary tale, being skipped ahead and pushed so hard burned me out so badly on education - along with not being socially ready for college because of my age and inexperience - that I floundered in college and my parents spent thousands just for me to fail out. Twice. If you really absolutely MUST skip your kid ahead, then encourage them to take time off after graduation for travel, volunteer work, or a job.

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8 0

I"m 19 and do not have any children, but I can say from personal experience that I would not.
In fifth and sixth grade, my teachers began to notice that I was doing extremely well in math. I admit it did come very easy, it was just the way i though about it I guess, very sequential. Anyway, when I went into seventh grade (first year of middle school and constant class switching), I was placed in advanced math. My teacher taught us everything everyone else learned but went more in depth and complex with each topic, therefore, going at a faster rate. Because of this, it was much harder to grasp. I had to grasp a concept to logically move on to the next, like I said, very sequential. I never learned math by memorizing a formula, I had to actually UNDERSTAND it, the way it worked. so by rushing through everything, we had to resort to memorization, and that alone.. I passed but not with flying colours.
In your situation, I'm assuming its a proposal to skip an elementary grade? Well, I could only imagine that to be much worse. SERIOUSLY worse. In an advanced class, they know you all came from the previous grade with just really good math skills. In skipping an entire grade in elementary school, they are teaching to children all from the previous grade... except your kid.. who will now miss a big portion, rather than just being rushed.
I am still good at math, but have always struggled greatly when placed in an advanced class for it.
All in all, you just have to think about the effects it may have and whether its worth for the kid to graduate one year earlier.
However, if your child has a gift or talent with something, you should nurture that on your own. And not every kid was me, even so, I turned out fine.. Just do what you think is best, neither decision has a huge impact.

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737 0

I let my daughter skip three grades total, but held her back twice because she wasn't ready for middle school when she was 8 or 9, but most 12 year olds aren't either. For being as mentally challenged as she was expected to be (born at 5.5 months) she was reading when she was 16 months old. When she was in 2nd grade, the teacher gave them a 4th grade math test as an april fools day joke, she got more than half of them right, although I don't know why the teacher graded them.
I knew when they kept wanting to advance her, that I'd have to hold her back later, I didn't want to stiffle her when she was six.

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15 7

I think this is bad idea, no matter what the situation. If your child is so truly gifted then you should send them to a private school so they can address his advanced learning needs if that is financially possible. I was moved up and regret it very much today. Caroline... there is no way to tell what the emotional and social implications will be down the road... especially in adolescence.

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0 0

I was a teacher for many years, and I would not skip my own gifted child. The most important thing is not their intelligence but also their maturity. If the child is wise and more mature for her or his age, it is fine to skip a grade. But I made sure my son was able to go to the library and read & work on harder assignments, but he stayed with his class. He is a successful man with his own gifted children now.

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1 16

Yes, I did and I would again if I had the chance. My son started 5K way ahead of the gang and well before Christmas break his teacher was going to a 2nd grade class to get work for him. During 1st grade he was sent to a 2nd grade class for Math and Reading every day (where he was still in the top group of that class). We decided to have him skip 2nd grade. He has always preferred playing with older kids anyway so it was no big deal. He came through 3rd grade with straight A's (tip top of the class), same with 4th grade. He is a child who has always picked up on things fast almost as if he has a photographic memory. He has also always tested on the extreme end of normal on standardized tests.

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37 27

My son has skipped a grade at school, I think if your child is more advanced then the right thing to do is let them skip a grade otherwise what they are being taught in class will be to easy for them, they will get bored and start to annoy other students who are trying to learn. Letting them go up a grade will be more of a challenge for them and will stimulate their brains into learning more.

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13 0

I am a retired elementary school teacher, and I really would consider each child's maturity as well as intelligence, before skipping them. I had a very bright son who was able to stay in the grade he belonged emotionally because the school let him do higher level work, and let him go to the school library often. He was not turned off to learning. I would consider the whole child, birthdate, and work with the family to make the best decision. He turned out great!

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38 13

Our school has a gifted program that bascially skips a child one grade in whatever subject(s) they need they are in an age appropriate class with their peers & do the usual work for all subjects other then then math or language arts/reading. they have teachers who have taught the gifted program for many years and are useto adapting their program to meet the kids needs & level of advancement. As a parent of a child with a late birthday I would have to think very hard before skipping my child. The program his school has works great for us as it challanges him & still keeps him with his peers. I can't even imagine sending my 17yr old off to college & him being ready & he is a very unshelterd kid who is mature for his age.

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11 3

it depends on the child. Some children have enough confidence to do well with the older kids but some children do not. If a child is really smart teachers are supposed to still challenge them which might mean giving them harder assignments. You can ask the teacher to do this and they have to. im in school to be a teacher so I know this is a fact.

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4 20

it all depends on the individual child. My bff and I did and we were okay with it. A little diff. at times for me but overall neither of us even noticed the diff. and my diff. were more social and bound to happen regardless of skipping. However, when the school wanted to skip me again my mom refused. Still not sure if that was a good or bad thing.

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120 0

I would. I skipped 2nd grade and graduated highschool at 16. Then I moved from the East Coast to HI to go to college. Sure, I sometimes felt I had to make up stuff to seem cool or more mature to keep up with my peers, but I still had a close circle of friends and felt comfortable in high school. But the most important thing was that I was doing work on my level. I never felt overwhelmed. If it was too boring and below my level I would have tuned out and actually become a bad student.

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9 15

Skip? No. Work through? Yes! Some private schools have curriculum that allows a student to finish working one grade and continue on to the next during the course of the school year. I did this myself. I graduated at 16 but did every scrap of work every other student did who was in school for 13 years instead of my 11

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38 39

I believe that this is an answer that varies by child, parent and school system. We had the option to skip a grade for my child and we chose not to move ahead. There were many factors that we considered in our decision. Standardized test results, grades and academic ability are only a part of what school is all about. School is also an environment in which to learn social skills, collaborative and team work tools, study habits and leadership abilities. We felt that overall there were still so many skills that could be learned even though academically there was less challenge. As well, we were able to discuss opportunities to increase challenge individually for our child and work together with the teachers to create an active learning situation without skipping grades.

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3 10

I actually had to deal with this issue this past summer. My daughter turned 4 in July. The cut off for Kindergarten is 5 buy Aug 1st. She is soo smart and so well adjusted that I went to the school board to see about testing her for Kindergarten. They told me she was way too young without ever meeting her. So I went to the Elementary school and spoke to the principle. She agreed to have my daughter tested. The councelor and the most experienced Kindergarten teacher (31 yrs teaching) tested her. They were soooo shocked. Tested at the 2nd grade level. The principle went ahead and enrolled her even though the school board said no. She has already finished all the Kindergarten work for the yr and we are only a month and a half in. She is reading some (better that her classmates) and is already doing basic addition and subtraction (not even taught in her class). I feel like her teacher is judging her a little harshly though. Her teacher has never had kids that were under 5 or "gifted" children. We are thinking of switching her to the teacher that actually did the test on her. That teacher said she would take my daughter at any point I dont want her in her current class (Im going to see the principle in about a week).
If she gets ahead again, I would have no concerns skip ahead again. I know she would be able to do the work and I know she would adjust with no problems. If they decide not to skip her, I know there are the advanced classes in Middle School and High School.

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99 48

I would. My daughter is 4 1/2 and currently in Pre-K in an elementary school. I think she needs to be in 1st grade frankly. What I hear most from strangers, is that my daughter speaks very well for her age. I believe that. When my daughter was 8 1/2 months old, she started walking. She never crawled. At 9 months old, she was running. At a year old, she was sleeping in a big kid bed-without rails. She was also pacifier and bottle weaned and could hold adult utensils when eating. At this age, she spoke more than the average amount of words required. At 18 months old, she was potty trained for "peeing." Also at this age, she spoke like an almost 3 year old. Instead of asking the usual, "Me go potty?" -She was saying, "I have to go potty mama." At 2 years and almost 9 months old, she was completely potty trained. Her speech was very impressive-and she was speaking like a 7 or 8 year old child. She also got lost in my sister's neighborhood, and walked UN-AIDED and ALONE back to my sister's house almost 2.5 miles away from the park she was playing (I was in another state). In Texas. 2nd time visit. At 2 years of age, my daughter started asking me questions about the "Gas Pipeline" and "How is paper made?" and "What makes a car move?", etc. She continues asking me questions. And I continue to answer them.

My child is very perceptive, intuitive, and always always asking questions. I told her a long time ago, and still do, that learning.....is FUN. That the more she asks, the more she will know, and the more she will understand. Parents should ALWAYS answer EVERY SINGLE SOLITARY QUESTION their child asks. I cannot stand it when parents ASSUME their children will just "know" things. WE have to SHOW them. TEACH them. ANSWER their questions. And answer it the first time too. No child is stupid. I REFUSE TO BELIEVE THAT. Every child can be reached. You just have to know how to reach them. If a child shows progress and advancement for their age, then most definately-and if it's an available option-I would advance them.

0
15 0

I would not allow my child and we have had the offer twice. I think its good to be around kids your own age and people forget how hard school is when you are hanging with your peers. I thing people forget the social part of school.

0
43 0

Yes, I did, for both of my children. No problems. In fact, never regretted it for a single second. They're still both in the top of their classes (even after skipping) and there are no problems. But it all depends on the child. But I don't think this is a good question for a forum because each child is different and we don't know yours. Only you, the primary guardian, who spends the most time with the child (not teachers, principal, grandparents) know the best.

0
0 0

Here in Ontario, Canada they don't let kids skip a grade anymore. I have 3 kids, one of which could easily have skipped but that was never an option. they have gifted programs if you test as gifted, and other enrichment opportunities like french immersion but no longer can you just skip a grade. There are many basics you will miss. While my daughter is mature enough and physically would fit right in a grade higher, there really is no need. What it comes down to is, while it may work in younger grades, do you really want them finishing high school at 16 or 17 years old? I don't think they are mature enough then to move out and go to university.

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14 55

I don't see anything wrong with it as long as the child is mentally able to handle to jump. You need to not only think about academic maturity, but social maturity as well.

0
3 0

Kids like adults develop at different stages. Skipping a grade or retaining should only serve for the betterment of the child and not the egos of parents. An consistently bored or overwhelmed child is a recipe for disaster. That's my 2c worth. :)

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15 32

I think I had the best of both worlds for my son. He did about half a year in PreK and myself, his teachers and the administration realized he wasn't being challenged enough. He was reading at a 1st grade level and all other subjects at a Kindergarten level. So he finished the last half of the year in Kindergarten. So he didn't totally skip a grade, he just did it in half a year. So this fall, he will be in first grade. It was a very smooth transition and we were happy with how he emotionally adjusted.

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2 17

Yes, depending on the child. In fact, I am allowing my oldest to graduate a year earlier because academically, socially, emotionally, spiritually and mentally, she is ready. I am a Mom of four though, and can't say I would do so for the other 3. Like I said it depends on the child's readiness and desire to achieve. The other three are younger, so I do not know what lies ahead for each of them. I know that this is the best choice for my oldest child at this time. Every person is different and they have different levels of development as well as needs. I believe an informed decision on such issues is the best decision. I am a parent as well as an educator, but that doesn't mean I did not confer with her teachers, administrators and other parents before making such a decision.

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47 4

Yes, I would allow my child to skip a grade. I would rather have him challenged than bored, getting in trouble.

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