Is it for the school to pressure me about giving my autistic son meds.

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C - posted on 08/12/2013

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I would think that would be between you and your doctor Migele.
I would talk to your doctor and if you are having an issue with the schools to a point that cannot be resolved to your comfort of sending your child there, there are other options of educating your son.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 08/12/2013

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If hes supposed to be on meds, and you aren't giving them, then, yes the school can request that you follow the doctor's recommendations.

But if he's not supposed to be, and the doctors don't see any need for any, then, no.

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Mimi's - posted on 09/10/2013

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We in GA and I think they very cruel when it comes to the disabled kids they are so behind , not enough resources for them:(

Mimi's - posted on 09/10/2013

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I thank you for sharing your story with us. As I had mentioned before my son was doing well when I took him off the ADHD meds. In the summer he was sleeping better, eating well, not climbing or trying to escape from us or trying to hurt his little brother or himself he was talking and want to be playing us. I understand the meds help him to focus better in school but problem when it wear off that's when the problems began I have to deal with him it wouldn't be too much a problem if I only have him but I have 3 other kid to deals with he's having meltdown and try to hurt his brother I try to explain to the teacher to just give time to adjust but no luck with that so reluctantly had to put back on it cause I can't afford to stay home they even kick him out of the after school program because I didn't give him his meds.

Shannon - posted on 09/07/2013

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I don't think it's really the school's position to pressure any parent about medications, but I think it's at least smart for a teacher to make a subtle observation or inquiry of the matter - I think it's probably hard and awkward for most teachers to decide to say something at all - but from a teacher's perspective, they also get to see that some kids respond well to medications and just want to help. But if they're really pushing it, you have the right to tell them you appreciate their suggestion but you're choosing alternate paths. I have 2 examples, if you're interested: I sat in one class with a girl who had ADHD and on her meds - she was smart as a whip, but her mom felt like she was pressured into giving them to her so she took her off of them and the kid went right back into her own little zoned out world and really couldn't function or interact with anyone at school - it was sad to witness, but of course, teacher's can't just be like, "But she was making such great progress! Please give her her meds!" And then from a personal standpoint - I was myself was staunchly against giving my autistic child any sort of artificial anything, let alone medications. But then one day, it just struck me, that it really wouldn't hurt just to try - if I really wanted to give my daughter every opportunity to succeed, I could have been holding success back from her by not offering her avenues I didn't necessarily agree with, you know? And what was the worst that could happen? I could always take her right off if they didn't work. At that time, she was nonverbal except for echolalia, ADHD, ODD, SPD, perseverative/OCD, self-injurious, violent, and an eloper in Special Education classes, and just such a handful. I wasn't expecting much when I gave in and tried her on her first lowest dose, but the change was INCREDIBLE! You could just see it in her little face, like a light came on! She could suddenly focus! She's still a handful, but she can actually hold conversations today, she doesn't run away or try to escape all the time, she's not climbing on everything! She's not hurting herself anymore, she's not as OCD, doesn't need to wear her headphones to drown out noise nearly as much as she used to, no violent outbursts - unless she's in an overwhelming situation when her meds wear off, like at the mall in the evening, or something, and then it's just like it used to be - but harder because she's bigger and stronger - so we just try to monitor the time of day - when they wear off at home, she's usually fine, for the most part. But for our family, it's working, and I'm so thankful that we tried - she's in regular 1st grade classes now, and it didn't take away her autism, but she really is able to succeed. Ours is a success story, but I know it's not for everyone. I just like to share for those who are on the fence. Wishing your family the very best of successes!

Patriciariggs - posted on 08/18/2013

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Not all People Autistic or with other illnesses can always take meds. for one reason or another. Patience and attention to what they respond to is sometimes better that way you learn how and what to do or not do to make the person feel as if they are always wrong. Schools should be better trained as how to deal with those that are different, but also deserve an education like everyone else. After all God created us in the image he wanted us to be, and not as robots or for the purpose to serve others but to serve him. We are all individuals.

Mimi's - posted on 08/18/2013

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Did u end up giving him meds.? My son doesn't have anything else beside autism yes he gets very hyper at time but he will stop if he ask too.

Susan - posted on 08/16/2013

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Not sure what state you are in, but a lot of states the school gets more money if a child is on meds and have more than one diagnosis....My son is autistic and only autistic, no other diagnosis and they were constantly trying to tell us that he was aggressive and needed med to calm down. He is very passive, we have to watch that is younger sister doesn't boss him around, loving, but active and ONE twenty minute recesses at 2 PM will not cut a "normal" kid energy down.....need to stop my rant...sorry about that

Chet - posted on 08/15/2013

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It's hard to say. I agree with Shawnn Lively. If he is supposed to be on medication, and you aren't giving it, then, yes the school can request that you follow the doctor's recommendations. However, if the doctor sees your son for relatively short periods of time and the school spends a lot of time with him in a completely different setting than a doctor's office, I would take the school's observations seriously. Definitely get detailed information about why the school wants him on meds to your doctor and discuss it.

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