My daughter is 8 nearly 9 years of age, What is a good age to talk puberty??

Trisha - posted on 11/17/2009 ( 23 moms have responded )

5

46

0

She does know how babies are made in basic terms but not about periods etc.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Arlene - posted on 11/22/2009

10

24

0

be open and honest about it and she will start asking questions and continue to be open and honest. tell her like it is.sorry but i found that is the only way.they will find out stuff in a different way at school or from friends or others
and it will be upseting for yu when yu find out she is learning the wrong words for a part of her body parts or she is doing sex as a earily age or something scary for us parents to hear or see happen when we as parents should step up to the plate and teach our own children and the birds and the bees and periods or how thier body grows.just as God intend it to happen. yu could buying a book to read with her and teach it that way too. it is just a thought but it might work.

Paulette - posted on 11/21/2009

4

15

0

I bought my daugther a book and read some of it with her and told her that she could come talk about anything related to it also. It talks about body changes (breasts), periods, boys, cleanliness, pimples and all that "stuff"! She's 9. It's called "The care and keeping of You - the Body book for girls" and it's the American Girl series of books. You should talk to her because some girls do get periods as early as 9 or 10.

Kim - posted on 11/21/2009

28

2

3

That may actually be a good age. I was only 9 or 10 when I started. You don't need to tell her everything. Just explain about the basics. Such as pubic hair, hormones affecting her emotions, the bleeding, and other such facts. Also mention that she will eventually need to start using deoderant and wearing training bras. But most importantly try to make her feel it's a speacial thing not to be ashamed of and that all girls go through it. Don't be afraid or embarrased to answer her questions. If she asks something you feel she's too youg too know then tell her that or tell her a portion of it that is age appropriate. Remember that what she feels you're hiding she will ask her friends.

Christina - posted on 11/20/2009

4

30

0

it depends on her matrity level. by 2nd grade my daughter was in bras so we kind of haad to start. it was basic in the fact that her body was starting to change and i told her what to look for is very general terms. they will ask more questions if they want more information. FYI she did start mer period in 4th grade, and one of my close friends daughter started last year in 2nd grade. the food we have now has so much added hormones and filled with fat it makes all of our kids start puberty earlier. from the pic i would say you two are very close :) sometimes its harder for us mommies out there than for them....they grow up way way to early!

Lisa - posted on 11/19/2009

12

21

0

My two daughters, one is 9 going on 10 and the other has her periods, I told them bits and pieces along the way. They have seen me changing pads or tampons, and have retrieved them for me. I answer questions giving them inofrmation appropriate to my age. My 9year old knows all about periods and has for some time, and she knows it has to do with babies, but not all the details of sex and how the egg is fertilised, but enough that she needs to know and that if her periods come early, and I have known girls as young as 8 and 9, then she knows what they are, and that they are normal, and doesn't think she is bleeding to death. It is important to remember that she needs to know before it happens.

23 Comments

View replies by

Trisha - posted on 11/21/2009

5

46

0

I have done the "Deed" lol.
I used a relaxed approach with the help of a book "Just for Girls" (I live in Australia)
We had fun discussing it all and I actually showed her the products she might want to use. She actually sounded excited!! Especially the part about getting bigger breasts. lol
I feel sad that she is growing up way to fast, but proud of how well she seems to accept things!
Thanks again to All you lovely ladies who gave me great advice and the 'confidence' to do it!! xxxx

Rae - posted on 11/19/2009

3

6

1

I have a daughter the same age. She is aware of what I go through monthly. I have broached the subject of her changes already. Because, it is entirely possible that she could start her period any day! Not that I want her to or that it is the norm or that she will be mature enough to go through it. But, my neice started at 9 and you must be prepared (and more importantly she must be) just in case! How horrible for her to be in her 3rd or 4th grade class and start her period and not know what to do! funny: She is already saying "I am NOT using a tampon!" lol

Tracy - posted on 11/19/2009

8

9

3

I would start it now. My daughter already had boobs and hair down below at 9!

Amanda - posted on 11/19/2009

81

7

7

I got the american girl The Care and Keeping of You book also and thought it was great. It opened up the communication and if there is something that maybe she wants to double check (because lets face it in a kids eyes no "mom" knows all the answers) its right there for her.

Anita - posted on 11/19/2009

3

17

0

There is never a good time because each child mature differently, my daughter is 7 and the reason I talked to her is because I was nine when I started having my cycle and she is already growing hairs and maturing since 5.

Trisha - posted on 11/19/2009

5

46

0

A BIG THANK YOU to everyone for all your kind words and wisdom!!!!
I appreciate all your advice and I feel a lot more comfortable!!!
Thanks again!! =)

Sara - posted on 11/18/2009

1

10

0

I just began this talk with my daughter who will be 9 in January. I only started talking about it because our son (5th) is discussing puberty in school right now and we had a very relaxed family talk at the dinner table.

Mandy - posted on 11/18/2009

16

18

1

i have heard that you should explain everything to your child between the ages of 7-9 so they have the facts about things. this is the time that they start asking questions and start asking each other, if you tell your child the facts than when others ask her she can share with them. if you feel uncomfortable maybe getting a book on the subject could help.

Darlene - posted on 11/18/2009

23

24

2

I have always found that being honest and matter of fact as early as possible is the best approach to me. I have 6 year old twins (boy and girl) who have known since they were about 4 and have no problem with it, I just explain that it means that if you want to you can have a baby, but I also explain family values and what I expect (college and marriage first). I just act very naturally about it and answer their questions honestly, but with"decorum" I also have issues that I have excessive hemorraging, and could not avoid the questions from a young age.

Laurel - posted on 11/18/2009

5

24

1

I have to agree that the American Girl book is GREAT!!! It not only explains everything in a tween kinda way, but also has info for parents so they know how to respond to any questions your daughter might have about the whole subject. I have a 12 y/o who got the book a few years ago from Santa and she still looks at it if she has a question. Our school has a program that is optional for the kids in 4th grade that goes over the entire process and what they should expect. When my daughter got her period for the first time she could care less, she knew what it was and what to expect so she was fine....it was Mom who was in a panic to know my baby girl was growing up. Since then my 12 y/o has read the book with my 8y/o so she too will be ready when the time comes. you will find that once you get the convo started it will come naturally to you and your daughter will be fine with it! Good Luck

Jennifer - posted on 11/18/2009

3

20

0

I would start @ the library, there are plenty of books that are age appropriate and you can always call ahead & have a librarian set aside a few for you. It may be a lil' uncomfortable but as long as you take her questions w/ a grain of salt she can get the info she wants/needs and she's learned it from you (w/ your values) and not misinformation from a friend of hers.

[deleted account]

Hey! My little girl turned 9 this week! My approach is to be very easy going about the whole thing. I remember my mother was soooo tense and uncomfortable, it made the whole thing scary. So I just casually mention that soon her breasts will start to pop out, hair will start to grow invarious places and... errr.... you know the rest!



But I just want her to love her body as it changes, not to worry about the whole thing, and be able to talk about it with me if she wants to.

Ronnetta - posted on 11/17/2009

2

20

1

my daughter is already nine and i have sat her down and talked about her cycle...i had mine at ten so i didn't want it to be a shock to her if she gets hers soon

Trisha - posted on 11/17/2009

5

46

0

Thanks everyone!!!! Over the years I have been honest with most things but was unsure how to approach 'puberty'... I didnt want to jump in too early (I wanted her to enjoy being a girl) but dont want to leave it too late either! So thanks again!

Andria - posted on 11/17/2009

4

16

0

I was wondering about this topic myself. My daughter just turned 7, but she is already developing and wears a training bra. I have a feeling that her getting her period is right around the corner. Thanks for the book advice I will look into it. I agree with the other ladies who posted, being honest, but simple will help her understand more. Chances are she knows more that you think she does. =)

Michelle - posted on 11/17/2009

1

1

0

I bought my daughter a book at meijer per. my pediatrician it is called...THE CARE AND KEEPING OF YOU.The body book for girls its one of the american girl series of books it is AWESOME and helps let the girls know that every women goes thru it and everyone is different and it kinda opens the door and makes it easier for my daughter to ask questions about it ( we usually do this when i am taking a bath as we both know there is never alone time hahaa.) but anyway try it I am telling u NO LIE its an easy tool for u to buy and for u to feel close to your daughter and have open conversations about her body and the changes she will be going thru...

Tina - posted on 11/17/2009

2

5

1

Explain it in terms that do not confuse. She is aware of more than you think and will talk to friends if she is not getting answers. Ask her if she understands the personal products you use and that will open the door.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms