My son has trouble with school

User - posted on 07/30/2013 ( 7 moms have responded )

294

0

102

My son has lots of trouble with every thing but math and science and some history in school he has adhd on meds but still has trouble remembering things he reads the teacher says that he can be coloring some thing while she is talking and then ask him what she was talking about and he can tell her but if he was to read it he couldnt tell you anything even 5 minutes after he read it, he got all bad grades in 3 things but when the ISAT test came he past with no problems i dont understand he was tested for alot of things from a doc and they said he CANT learn from just hearing things he has to touch /move be active while doing it but yet the teacher can go over something before a test is given and was told he can use the book if needed and he wouldnt even open it and get an A do the same thing like in spelling a fail???was told he was not good at math but yet a toured he had said thats he's strong point and that he should have been in advance classes but got a c cause he didnt pass the final test i dont understand and i dont know what to do to help him? should i get him retested? what should i tell the school to help him more? plz help school starts in 4 weeks he will be in 5th grade a mommy of two

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

[deleted account]

This is very common in children with ADHD actually. I myself can learn much more efficiently if I am allowed to color or doodle while someone lectures. The activity of drawing or coloring allows me to expel energy that would otherwise distract me while I listen. Also, it takes JUST enough mental exertion to keep my mind from wondering off on a tangent.
Reading is more difficult because we are required to look at the pages, so coloring or doodling would not work. Some people with ADHD have had success reading while walking on a treadmill but for most people the bouncing up and down that we do when we walk makes focusing on things up close difficult, they have a hard time reading the words. A new option is a foldable stationary bike that sits under ones desk. To my knowledge, no one has tried it out with ADHD people yet (they are designed for people who work in an office and don't have time to exercise), but I think it would work well. You can get them on Amazon for about $40.

Parents of children with ADHD are often told that their children cannot learn just from hearing things and need hands on learning, but really it is a blanket statement. While MOST children with ADHD find it easier to stay focused, and thus learn, when their hands are engaged, many learn just fine through auditory teaching as long as their hands are busy. The reason the "hands on" teaching methods tend to me more effective with children with ADHD is because it keeps their body moving--the same think coloring or doodling while listening does for your son. Many of them need to be entirely focused on what they are learning to retain it, but many, like me and your son, only need to have their hands moving, it doesn't matter whether the hands are working on the activity being taught, or something else (so long as the "something else" isn't so absorbing it takes their attention away from the teacher).

Another good way to work on reading comprehension with him is to have him read a short section silently to himself, then out loud to you. Then ask him to tell you in his own words what happened. Next have him do the same thing with the next short section, but this time, ask him to tell you what happened in the first section AND the second section. Basically, ask him to tell you the story from the start every time you read a new section.
As he gets better at doing this, start asking questions about WHY certain characters did or said what they did and how their actions influenced the story. This will make him think more deeply about what he is reading.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 07/31/2013

13,264

21

2015

Can I just copy and paste Kelly's answer? It's spot on

And, for the school end of it, see if you can get him on an IEP...Individualized Education Plan.

7 Comments

View replies by

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 08/06/2013

13,264

21

2015

Again, Have you presented them with the physician's diagnosis?

If you're in the US, the public school system is obligated to provide the educational tools, including the IEP, if it is recommended by a physician.

Go to the district special services office, include the superintendent of schools, and present the physician's recommendation. Been around this block a few times. The school district CANNOT deny an IEP if it is recommended by the physician.

User - posted on 08/05/2013

294

0

102

they wont give him an IEP cause they say he can get good grades in a class with no more than 20 kids but does great with 10 kids,, and i changed schools already cause of the way they treated him, we only have 4 schools that r within 6 miles other than that i as a disabled mom would have to drive him atleast 10 miles one way to the other schools maybe fewther as of now i have to drive him 1 miles just to get to school and yes we has snow for winter lol not sure about the other things u said but if he can go to see a tour after school at;east 3 times a week his grades and learning go up like from a c to an a so im gonna talk with the board and tell that they need to have a after school toured for him cause they all say hes smart and he knows everything after he get it but he cant seem to show or tell you that he knows it they sat thats why he gets bad grades cause he cant remember that he really knows it but if you give him a test 89 percent of the time he passes but he has to be able to tell and show he knows

Anita - posted on 08/04/2013

3

0

0

Does he have an IEP? Is he in a therapeutic classroom? My son has adhd and Asperger's. He is 11. Got him to another school in 3rd grade because his school did not have the program for him. So much better. It was horrible. Do you have regular meetings with the schoolboard?

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 08/01/2013

13,264

21

2015

Have you presented them with the physician's diagnosis?

If you're in the US, the public school system is obligated to provide the educational tools, including the IEP, if it is recommended by a physician.

Contact your school's special services division, and keep pushing. They don't LIKE to do IEPs, because that means that they have to make adjustments, which (although the adjustments AREN'T that problematical) means that they have to put in a little effort.

You are your child's advocate. Be the 'squeaky wheel'

User - posted on 07/31/2013

294

0

102

the schools around here will not give him an iep they say he does ok in a class seting as long as its not over 20 kids and hes to smart for the classes that go with it because he can get A,B,Cs hes ok and that he can pass the end of year test

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms