teaching to read?

Stacy - posted on 11/17/2009 ( 11 moms have responded )

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My daughter is 6, in the first grade. She refuses to read. She seems to be haven trouble on even consentrating on the words. I tried putting book marks under the sentence she was reading, and it didn't work. What else can I try? I do not want her to fall behind! Any advise?

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[deleted account]

We had the same problem, being a boy he just didn't want to know.
After intensive research by my husband we found the following solution and he has come a long way since then. He is nearly 6.
When children or adults go blank, it is because they don;t understand something usually a word.

Get a story, read to him or get him to read if very basic and each time she stops, etc. ask her first what this word means? If he tells you one, give him a simple answer, pictures to explain are best. You will find her interest returns, soon and her concentration will improve.

The main problems are the sight word for us parents, because they are very hard to explain, the teachers call them high-frequency words, words like the, on, a, ....

We got an illustrated dictionary from education-tech.org.uk, because we found it very hard to explain those sight words, you can see on their free download some samples of how much easier it is to explain. Our son, if he doesn't know something, asks to look at that "picture book."
I never will understand why the school teaches them to memorize these sight words but doesn't ever explain the meaning of the word. How would the children know if we don't tell them, by logical deduction at the age of 5? Hm.

(It has taken us a year to get him up to scratch but he is doing now very well.)

Linda - posted on 12/09/2012

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Each child is different and approaches thing differently, including reading/spelling. What has helped my son (and daughters) to enjoy reading is snuggling up with him every night as part of our bedtime routine and reading to him. We let him pick the book(s). If it's an easy book, we take turns reading the pages. While he prefers us reading to him, we explained that he needs to practice. We made sure he knew how to recognize the letters and their sounds. Now we are working on just sounds and the many different ways sounds are made. We break up words into syllables and while there is no set rule to spelling, I advised him to look at the words while he reads and become familiar with the different spelling ways. It's like a puzzle. We also build on vocabulary, using words he knows as an introduction to "big" words by way of antonyms, synonyms, prefixes, suffixes. Of course, I only do this when the interest in there.



I learned this by accident with my oldest. She was the chatty one, asking all kinds of questions, even when she could only grunt and say "dada." While her daddy was so proud I knew she wanted to know about "that." So I would just talk about whatever she pointed at. By 23 months she knew all her letters and could spell her name. She was tested reading at the 3/4th grade level in K and prefers to be in the on-level classes at school. We don't push. She's happy being where she is.



DD2 didn't start reading until she was in K. She knew some sight words but she always prefered us reading to her. Mysteries and fables were her favorite. So we were suprised when she was tested at the 3/4th reading level too in K. She's in the higher level classes now and is enjoying school.



I always answer their questions. If I don't know the answer, we look it up. We have a library at home. I build our library from used books from the thrift shop or book sales. My kids see me reading. I even have books in the car and in the bathroom!



No worries. With patience, practice, and perseverance, kids can overcome reading obstacles. Good luck.

Juanita - posted on 08/19/2012

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We were having the same problems with our 8 & 6 yr olds. Our 8 yr old would end up crying out of frustration. She would say, "I know it." but I doubted she did. She hated to read! We found a program that explained these are called 'stress spirials'. They also explain the 7 main reasons some children have difficulty learning to read.
The program is "Easyread by Oxford Learning Systems".This is an online program that uses imaginative synthetic phonics to help struggling children learn how to read. It is specially optimized for dyslexic children and highly visual learners.

This program has helped our two children by using lessons that are less than 15 minutes per day 4 to 5 days per week. We have been using it since Mid March and now there is no more crying! Instead, our children are now making an effort to read on their own. I wholeheartedly recommend this program!

For more information you can email me at jjmueller1@verizon.net or visit their website. (If you decide to use the program you can get 10% off if you have a referral--Just use JuanitaMueller as a referral)

Carol - posted on 12/10/2009

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I forgot to mention - the HOP grades don't correspond to the public school grades until about 2nd grade. Also, sort of related, - my 1st grader's spelling words are so tough already! Last week his challenge word was "together" ! They spent only 5 weeks on the easy 3 letter words for short vowels and have graduated to 4-5 letter long vowel words. They're already on U now so I'm expecting things to get even harder next week.

Are your daughter's spelling lists this tough? I don't remember my 9 year old having such tough words and that was only 3 years ago. I consider my son lucky that he did figure out reading last year so he doesn't have to struggle to read AND spell the words. He tells me all the time about the kids who are getting 0's on their tests - way to set them up to love school.

Carol - posted on 12/10/2009

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I used the Hooked on Phonics K-2 and then the 3-6 Master Reader kits to to teach my kindergartener last year. He started not knowing the full alphabet and finished the year reading at a 6th grade level. I did homeschool last year but the reading portion of his school work only took about 15-20 minutes a day. This year he's in public school and his reading is fantastic. He helps his 3rd grade reading buddy with words the 3rd grader gets stuck on. Of course you can teach her to read without the program but if you're not sure how - HOP spells everything out for you. It is sooo simple and the incentive stickers after each lesson work great. (I hung it on the wall and as he completed more and more of them he could literally see how well he'd done - great confidence booster)

Kelly - posted on 12/08/2009

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make it a point to learn the sounds for each letter. you don't need the Hooked on Phonics kit either. letter flash cards. i've noticed that not every teacher puts an emphasis on this. i could see this skill made them better readers and spellers. flash cards are good too but have her phonetically sound each letter in the word then say the word again. teachers teach a lot of sight words (they should know them by sight not take time to sound). but then i notice they tend to look at the first letter and then guess. remember not to rely solely on public school to educate your kids, take that extra time with her it does pay off.

Stacy - posted on 11/23/2009

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Thanks for all the good ideas. She is reading 4 pages a day, wich I think is great, since she never read before. I will read a sintence, then she wil point out the words and read that same sentence. we sound out the words she does not know. Hopefully she will be trying on her own soon. Thanks again for your ideas.

Sharolett - posted on 11/18/2009

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my son is the same way he has gotten alot better about trying to sound things out. I have to use my finger under each word. He reads on page and I read the next its getting alot better! I am going to try the captioning I would have never thought of that! But it makes sense... Good luck!

[deleted account]

My nephew was behind in reading and my sister just invested an extra 10 minutes to read one more story to him each day for a month. Within two weeks she spied him with one of his class books stumbling over the words by himself. Now it has changed to an extra 5 minutes of his reading to her each day and he is back up at level.

Vicki - posted on 11/17/2009

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Quoting Stacy:

teaching to read?

My daughter is 6, in the first grade. She refuses to read. She seems to be haven trouble on even consentrating on the words. I tried putting book marks under the sentence she was reading, and it didn't work. What else can I try? I do not want her to fall behind! Any advise?


I realize this sounds somewhat strange, but what worked WONDERS with my daughter (and my 2 nieces at their toddler age) at the age of 4 and 5 was putting close captioning on whenever we watched TV. The child sees the word on the screen, hears it pronounced and it seems to "click" in their reading. My daughter is in 2nd grade, but has tested out of reading up to the 6th grade. Just my advice...

Kareemah - posted on 11/17/2009

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try to make a game out of it. There are many educational toys, computer games, practice books and such. Also, if you sit down and help her to write simple short stories. you will have to spell words for her, you can also have her draw pictures to match the story. This will help her to identify words better and the more comfortable she feels with the words, the more prone she is to read. Try to get books that will hold her interest. If she likes Dora the Explorer, get some Dora books. Be patient and try to make it as fun for her as possible.

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