I am a stay-at-home-mommy of five... gotta share how I've been saving tons of money

Tally - posted on 01/22/2010 ( 2 moms have responded )

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For over a year now, I haven't put out ANY MONEY for my household and personal care products. DON'T YOU LOVE FREE STUFF? I DO : )



OK! so...How?



All I did was switch stores, started shopping green, and tell folks about it. The company doesn't advertise but relies on its customers to spread the word.... and rewards them to do so. I say better me than some celebrity endorser. This has completely eliminated an expense from my budget.



touch base with me here if you'd like to check into this



Blessings,

Tally

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Tally - posted on 01/26/2010

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WHY USE NON-TOXIC PRODUCTS?
According to a 15-year study presented at the Toronto Indoor Air Conference, women who work at home have a 54% higher death rate from cancer than those who work away from home. The study concluded that this was a direct result of the increased exposure to toxic chemicals, many of which are found in common household products.
More than 9 out of every 10 suspected poison exposures occur at home with household products.
WHAT’S UNDER YOUR SINK?
• Carpet Cleaners
Extremely toxic to children. The fumes given off by carpet cleaners can cause cancer and liver damage.
• Chlorine
The chemical most frequently involved in household poisonings and a potent pollutant. May cause reproductive, endocrine, and immune system disorders.
• Degreasers
May contain petroleum distillates and butyl cellosolve, which can damage lung tissues and dissolve fatty tissue surrounding nerve cells.
• Drain Cleaners
One of the most hazardous products in the home. Can contain lye, which is a strong caustic substance that causes severe corrosive damage to eyes, skin, mouth, and stomach. Can be fatal if swallowed.
• Glass Cleaners
May contain ammonia. Fumes from ammonia can irritate skin, eyes, and respiratory system.
• Mold and Mildew Removers
Often an acute respiratory irritant. May damage lungs, eyes, and skin.
• Oven Cleaners
One of the most dangerous cleaning products. Can cause severe damage to eyes, skin, mouth, and throat.
• Scouring Cleansers
May contain butyl cellosolve, a petroleum-based solvent that can irritate mucous membranes and cause liver and kidney damage.
• Toilet Bowl Cleaners
One of the most dangerous cleaning products. Can contain chlorine and hydrochloric acid. Harmful to health simply by breathing during use.
• Tub and Tile Cleaners
Can contain chlorine and may contribute to the formation of organochlorines, a dangerous class of compounds that can cause reproductive, endocrine and immune system disorders.
Here are some categories of toxins to be familiar with:
Carcinogens are substances that cause cancer. They can be inhaled, absorbed through the skin or ingested. They can either initiate damage to cellular structure or promote abnormal cell growth, leading to tumors. Carcinogens are prevalent in products ranging from pesticides and paint strippers to cosmetics. Formaldehyde, for example, is a carcinogen found in carpet glues, furniture and in building materials like particleboard, fiberboard and plywood. It is also found in cleaning products and detergents. One particularly prevalent carcinogenic compound found in homes is perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA). Fast food containers migrate fluorotelomers via food grease into our bodies, where it is then converted into PFOAs. See more information below on perfluorochemicals.
Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Risk Assessment Forum of the Environmental Protection Agency defines this as "an exogenous agent that interferes with the synthesis, secretion, transport, binding, action, or elimination of natural hormones in the body that are responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis, reproduction, development and/or behavior." (Risk Assessment Forum EPA/630/R-96?012 February 1997). Essentially, these are synthetic chemicals found in cosmetics, soaps, pesticides, etc. that interfere with our hormones, which in turn affects how we develop and function. While the EPA claims there is insubstantial evidence of the impact these have on humans, there are well-documented scientific studies that show their impact on other living organisms. The WWF (World Wildlife Foundation) states on its website, "The effects of endocrine disruptors on animals are varied -- ranging from alligators born with abnormally small phalluses and birds with crossed beaks, to the sudden disappearance of entire populations. Wildlife researchers over the last few years have unearthed a variety of endocrine disruptor-related effects: interrupted sexual development; thyroid system disorders; inability to breed; reduced immune response; and abnormal mating and parenting behavior. Species such as terns, gulls, harbor seals, bald eagles, beluga whales, lake trout, alligators, turtles, and others, have suffered more than one of these effects."
Perfluorochemicals (PFCs, PFOS & PFOA) feature chains of carbon atoms of varying lengths, to which fluorine atoms are strongly bonded, yielding a practically indestructible chemical that does not degrade. These are found in stain-resistant, water-resistant and non-stick products. In studies the 3M Company submitted to the government in 2001, scientists reported finding PFOA in the blood of 96 percent of 598 children tested in 23 states and the District of Columbia. Once introduced, these continue in the body for years. If new exposures stopped, the body would require about 4 1/2 years to excrete half the accumulated mass of PFOA in organs and tissues. These chemicals are linked to breast, testicular and prostate cancers, reproductive and hormonal damage, as well as organ damage.
Phthalates ("THAY-lates") are plasticizers derived from petroleum used to make polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and synthetic fragrances, among other things. As their purpose is to lengthen the life of fragrances and soften plastics, they are often found in cosmetics, perfumes, wood finishes and the like. They've been known to damage reproductive systems in animals and two human studies have suggested lower testosterone levels and demasculinized traits in male babies of mothers with higher levels of phthalates in their breast milk. The Food and Drug Administration permits general labels instead of specific ingredient names, so look for the general term "fragrance" and stay away from food storage products that stretch.
Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are found in electronic casings and some furniture foams. These have similar chemical characteristics to the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) banned in the late '70s and are known to cause damage to the nervous system, including brain damage in utero. PBDEs have been found in plastic electronics casings, foam in upholstered furniture and in household dust.
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) comprise hundreds of natural and man-made, carbon-based agents. They react quickly with other carbon-based compounds and evaporate easily. They are also a major contributing factor to ozone, an air pollutant. According to the EPA, VOCs tend to be even higher (two to five times) in indoor air than outdoor air. They are linked to cancer, eye and respiratory tract irritation, headaches, dizziness, visual disorders, and memory impairment. VOCs are found in anything from paints, cleaning agents, and carpet to deodorants and cosmetics.

Tally - posted on 01/26/2010

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For those of you who messaged me ... you can visit www.LiveTotalWellness.com/tally and request information. that's the best way to learn all the details.

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