it seems my breast milk does not fill up my 2 month old... its squirts out during feeds so its obviously flowing fine but she wants to feed every 20-30 minutes, i have a 2 year old and not to sound un-motherly but its just not convinient, im considering weening onto formula as my health visitor advised... any ideas?

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Kristen - posted on 02/05/2009

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I wouldn't completely wean yet. Consider breast feeding and formula feeding, give her a couple of formula bottles a day to help you. Also consider pumping and bottle feeding breast milk. Pumped breast milk is more convenient than formula imo. It is good at room temp for 10-12hrs. Good in the fridge for 7 days, freezer for 3 mo and deep freeze for 6mo. If the baby doesn't finish a bottle you can offer at the next feeding. Breast feeding provides antibodies and health benefits you can't get from formula, so try these options first. Even if it doesn't work out and you have to do formula all the time you at least did have the opportunity to breast feed for a while.

Bonnie - posted on 02/03/2009

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This was true in my case. I went through every route of examining my breast milk and why she was not satisfied and it boiled down to a low fat content, full or empty breast. Perhaps what I said didn't come out they way I intended but the point is, if you don't have a high fat content in your breastmilk, odds are your child will not be as satisfied. I do not feel bad for giving my children formula. They are all very smart, and extremely healthy so I don't stress about it.

Lorilynne - posted on 02/03/2009

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Quoting Bonnie:

I just want to add...I noticed lots of posters mentioning the hindmilk...True, it is nutrient rich, but not everyone produces enough of the fat in the hindmilk to sustain the feeding. This was my issue. If there is not enough fat in the hindmilk, the baby will not get the full feeling. If this is the case, my opinion is that continuing to nurse without any kind of supplement may actually deprive of nutrients that are contained in the fat. If you want to check the fat content, simply pump into a bottle and let it settle. Atleast half should be fat. If not, this may explain why the baby isn't satisfied. In a 4 oz bottle, no more than 1 oz was ever fat. My daughter was better off on formula.



No, this isn't actually true.  Here are some really good links that explain foremilk and hindmilk.



http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/foremi...



http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/c...



I'm not trying to call you out or say that you did the wrong thing by giving formula, Bonnie, I just think that this is a very common myth about breastfeeding that needs to be addressed.  Basically, it boils down to this.  The emptier the breast, the higher the fat content in the foremilk.  The fuller the breast, the lower the fat content in the foremilk.  If your breast is full, it will take longer to get to the fatty milk than if your breast is empty.  So pumping to see how much of the milk is fat is not a very good indicator of how much hindmilk you produce. 



 

Bonnie - posted on 02/03/2009

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I had the same issue with my daughter. I would nurse for 20-30 minutes and then she would be ready to eat 20 minutes later. So I started supplementing with 2-3 oz of formula immediately following nursing. Eventually it was strictly formula. It's not "unmotherly" so don't feel bad!

Sylvia - posted on 02/01/2009

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Of course we all agree breast is best and now that we have that out of the way, let's get real.  Make sure your baby is happy, well fed and thriving:  that is what is MOST important.  I struggled 20 years ago with the very thing you are struggling with now and I have never had anyone ask me in the last 19 years if Tim was breast fed or bottle fed. ULTIMATELY it really doesn't matter as long as your child is loved, fed, ENJOYED by you, and family. Generations of children have survived and even thrived on formula. If baby is happy with a full tummy, guess what...Momma will be happy too....and so will everyone else.  Listen to your heart, :)




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Katie - posted on 02/22/2013

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My baby boy is a month old and he's eating non stop. For about a week after we for home form te hospital he what I though was cluster feeds or growth spurt. Then for about 3 days he went back to the same routine we were on in the hospital. Eating 2-3 ounces then sleeping for 3-4 hours. ( I'm pumping but some times he gets formula. The same kind they gave him at the he hospital.) so now again he's eating all day this is our routine on days like this. He'll wake up around 730 am and eat eat eat hell fall asleep while eating some times so ill put him to bed he will sleep about 15-45 minutes. Then wake up fussy and then start to cry for more food.hell go through about 20 ounces a day most of that consists of breast milk but some times I can't keep up so hell get formula. Then when he's quiet and not fussing for more food ill give him tummy time and back time. Until he starts asking for more food. Then finally around 930 hell fall asleep for about 5-7 hours. Usualy waking back up again around 330 eats 3-4 ounces sleeps until 730am and we do it all over again the next day. Any tips or advice? Is this normal? Should he not be sleeping more?

Ranetta - posted on 02/05/2009

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My son did the same thing. Especially when he was just a few months old. It seemed like I couldnt feed him enough. I had to quit breastfeeding at 6 months and he hated switching over but we have all adjusted and are doing well. I think breastfeeding is really important (plus you lose the weight more quickly) but he is just fine now on the formula- besides the smell... Do what you can and dont worry about what others THINK you should do.

Kristen - posted on 02/05/2009

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Also, have your dr. check for acid reflux. This is what was wrong with my baby. They always scream after eating. But will keep trying to eat, they hurt and don't know why so they think they need to eat. Try feeding the baby sitting up or hold baby up for 20 min after feeding. Also babies will keep wanting to eat if they have a lot of gas. Try Dr. Brown's bottles or another that eliminates the air ingested.

Bonnie - posted on 02/03/2009

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I just want to add...I noticed lots of posters mentioning the hindmilk...True, it is nutrient rich, but not everyone produces enough of the fat in the hindmilk to sustain the feeding. This was my issue. If there is not enough fat in the hindmilk, the baby will not get the full feeling. If this is the case, my opinion is that continuing to nurse without any kind of supplement may actually deprive of nutrients that are contained in the fat. If you want to check the fat content, simply pump into a bottle and let it settle. Atleast half should be fat. If not, this may explain why the baby isn't satisfied. In a 4 oz bottle, no more than 1 oz was ever fat. My daughter was better off on formula.

Kiera - posted on 02/03/2009

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That's true, my daughter had reflux.  Once we figured it out she still nurse all the time though, it was just less frustrating because she wasn't crying as much during and after feeding.

Kiera - posted on 02/03/2009

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I just went through that with my daughter. I have a 7 month old (still breastfeeding) and a 27 month old. My 7 month old was always on the boob. I think it was bc she wanted to be comforted and she wouldn't take a pacifier. She would suck on my boob but not always eat so I never knew if she was hungry or needed comfort. It got better once she started solid foods but she wouldn't do that until about 5 months. I think the best thing if you want to keep breastfeeding would be to try to get her to take the pacifier. That way you can tell when she's really hungry or when she needs comfort. If you can hold her off with the pacifier, when you do feed her she may be hungry enough to finish a whole meal. Hope this helps!

Amanda - posted on 02/03/2009

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You still have a fairly young baby and breast milk does burn off much faster which is a downside but it is the best thing for your baby while you are able to do it. I would keep at it and try to stretch it into longer segments with a nap or some "play" and get it to around an hour...I suffered through a lot of nursing but was all right with doing it every hour...when the growing slowed so did the nursing. Good luck!!!



 

Michele - posted on 02/02/2009

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Does she have reflux?  Constant nursing could be a sign of it.  When a baby is drinking, it keeps the acid from rising back up in the esophagus, so it doesn't hurt anymore.  Other signs include lots of spitting up, crying, arching the back, etc.  Have you talked to your doctor about it?

Lorilynne - posted on 02/02/2009

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I went through this exact same thing when my son was born.  My daughter was 17 months old and wanting lots of attention and my son wanted to eat ALL the time.  It even got to the point where I told my husband that if my son didn't start going longer between feeds that I was going to give him formula because I just couldn't take it anymore.  Once I said it out loud, I realized I would never do it because for one, formula is just too expensive.   What I ended up doing was getting to the root of the issue, finding out why he wanted to nurse so much.  I started realizing that he wasn't actually hungry, he just wanted to suck and he wanted that comfort.  Thats when I introduced the pacifier.  Once I did that, he would go longer between feeds and feed for a longer period of time.  If you are absolutely at that point where you're ready to give formula, I honestly don't think any suggestion that is made is really going to help.  However, if you are still at that point where you really don't want to give formula unless its a last resort, then I would try some of the things the other women suggested.    Finding activities for your toddler and then making sure all other distractions are cut out for your baby is really solid advice.  Once my son hit about three months, he didn't need the pacifier as a soother anymore and he started regulating his feeds himself.  Now he's five months and there are no issues.  My daughter finds things to keep her busy or she just sits next to me on the couch and watches some tv and my son is such a champion nurser that he can get what he needs in about 10 or 15 minutes and is going about 2 or 3 hours between feeds.  The best advice I can give is to do what is best for you and your family.

Emily - posted on 02/02/2009

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I haven't been able to read all of the posts here... but I would have to agree with Stacey. I had oversupply and over-active letdown issues which caused my milk to constantly spray my babies, and they wouldn't eat for very long, but they would be hungry quite often. The problem was that they were filling up on foremilk and never getting the hindmilk. This would be similar to how you would feel if you were drinking juices all day, but never eating anything. Another way you can tell if your baby is only getting foremilk is if their poop is greenish... if they're getting enough hindmilk it should be very yellow with no hints of green at all.

The only thing that finally worked for me was to nurse from the same side for 3-4 hours at a time before switching. So, when you first put a baby on one side, they get foremilk for the first feeding, and gradually get more and more hindmilk throughout the next 3-4 hours. Then at the end of those four hours, you put the baby on the other breast, where they again start with the foremilk and gradually get more hindmilk during their next feeds.

This doesn't mean that you nurse for 3-4 hours straight... continue whatever nursing schedule your baby wants, just use the same side for every feeding until that time is up.

I do love my baby carriers, but I've never successfully learned to nurse in them, so I always have to sit and nurse (or carry a latched baby around). When my third was born I had a 31 month old and a 19 month old... so I definitely understand how hard it can be with toddlers around. But it's totally worth it. I would also have to say that bottle feeding with a toddler around was much harder than nursing with a toddler. The extra time spent preparing formula, sterilizing bottles, etc was much worse than just sitting down to nurse. I've done it both ways and I'm quite grateful I never had to do bottles with my third. (She's now 13 months old and still nursing strong.)

Try creating a "nursing box" for your toddler of fun things for them to play with that they can only have while you're nursing. Sit on the couch while you nurse so your toddler can climb up next to you and you can read stories to them (it's best if they can hold the book and turn the pages... keeps them occupied a bit longer and you don't have to work with the book and the baby).

Good luck!! I hope things get better for you. :)

Stacey - posted on 02/02/2009

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It sounds like she's not getting enough "hindmilk". THis is the after milk that is rich and calorie dense. If she gets too much of the "first milk", she may not be filling up and it may also make her very fussy and irritable because she is getting too much lactose. Is she gassy or fussy in general? She may be nursing every 30 min as a soothing mechanism, not because she's really hungry.



Try feeding her from only one breast at each feeding to ensure she gets the foremilk and hindmilk. If she comes off the breast, burp her and put her back on the same one, until she really seems done.



I agree with you that nursing a baby with a toddler around is VERY difficult. I did it, too. I never would have considered pumping because it seemed like double the work. For me it was the boob or formula. I managed to persist nursing and still am with my 6 month old. It does get easier as they nurse less often throughout the day/night and less at each feeding. Mine nursed for 45 min a clip in the beginning, leaving me little time for my 2 year old, let alone myself. Now, it's a piece of cake. Don't get me wrong there are times when formula would still be easier but overall, I'm glad I didn't quit.

With that said, go with your gut. If you're really leaning towards formula, that may be a better choice for your family.

Remember: HAPPY MOM, HAPPY CHILD!!!

Lori - posted on 02/01/2009

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I had a similar problem when I started breastfeeding. My daughter constantly wanted to nurse. It turned out that she was not getting enough to eat because she wasn't latching on correctly. Is your baby gaining enough weight? If your breasts are overly full too, it will be difficult for the baby to get a good latch. If that's the case you could try to express some of the milk by hand or a pump prior to feeding. I had such a hard time breastfeeding at first (I ended up getting mastitis that landed me in the hospital with a 105 fever). For the next 3 months I just pumped and bottle fed her. It was nice too because I could take a break and let my husband feed her. Later I tried breastfeeding again and didn't stop until she was 16 months old! Perhaps pumping and bottle feeding would work for you? Granted, it ties you to a pump during the day as well as feeding the baby, but overall it takes a lot less time than those marathon nursing sessions! That might be a way too, to have your 2 yr old feel more involved in the process since he could "help" feed the baby. Medela makes a pump now that is hands free (wish they had that option when I bought mine!). It's a little costly - $300-$400, but I figured that in the long run it was cheaper than buying formula. Hospitals also have pumps you can rent if you wanted to give it a try first. Best of luck!

Porchia - posted on 02/01/2009

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I would try removing the majority of her clothes and feed her lying down. She will be alert and she will have that skin to skin touch. While you are feeding her I would suggest having your two year old to pick his/her favorite book and read to them while you are nursing or look at pictures. That way, your two year old will be occupied near you but not restless and your nurser will feel more relax. It worked for me but I do agree with some of the moms with pumping and possible mixing breastmilk with formula. That worked for me too especially when I needed a good nights rest. 

Leslie - posted on 02/01/2009

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I hope that I didn't imply that you should breast feed to appease anyone else.  Ultimately babies are just as happy on formula, however if you choose to continue there are always people willing to help more than the Health Visitor you saw in the first place.  Good Luck.

Leslie - posted on 02/01/2009

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I am a huge supporter of breast feeding, I have had most of the problems that are out there, and I know that most things can be resolved.  I haven't had this problem, but have read a lot about it.  Chance are your baby is using you as a comforter.  Assuming that your making enough milk (try pumping to see), your baby should be content for at least two hours.  Maybe try distracting her, go for a walk when she gets fussy instead of offering the breast.  If the milk is coming to fast, she may be stopping for a rest before she gets the hindmilk. 



I would see a lactation consultant, not a health visitor, or a family doc.  Consultants want to see you continue and they ae so supportive.  I'm sure that they could help you more.  Try searching Jack Newman at Sick Kids in Toronto.  He's a breast feeding guru and is always able to give advice via email.

User - posted on 02/01/2009

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Try feeding on one side per feeding instead of switching after she burps. That way she will get the hind milk which will keep her satisfied longer.

Danialle - posted on 02/01/2009

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Sounds like a growth spurt try to tough it out a little longer if you can!

Courtney - posted on 01/31/2009

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Without knowing the composition of your milk, your health care provider should not be telling you not to nurse. Sometimes when pediatricians say this, it's because they are not supportive and/ or want to push a certain type of formula.



Ultimately, the choice is yours. Your baby COULD be hitting a growth spurt and this might fade. Try pumping and feeding her your milk from a bottle and if she still doesn't seem full, you shouldn't feel badly about giving her formula.



Also, you mentioned that laying her down causes outbursts. Have you talked with the pediatrician about reflux? It's possible that she wants to nurse because the position is more comfortable for her than lying on her back.

[deleted account]

Quoting Liana:



I don't agree with those who are calling you a lazy nurser or say that weening is drastic at the end of the day your baby is hungry and needs feeding. 





 



Nobody called the OP an lazy nurser, she said it sounded like her baby was a lazy nurser and that PP herself had had 4 of them.



My DS was a lazy nurser, meaning he would start off nursing fine but then when he wasn't as hungry wouldn't suckle and nurse as well, resulting in him not getting as much milk and wanting to nurse more frequently.



It could in all honesty be a ton of different things going on that is causing the constant feeding, improper latch, poor suckling, growth spurt, lack of hind milk, distraction, the list goes on and on.  One of the easiest (and totaly free BTW) way to get help with breastfeeding problems is through La Leche League www.lalecheleague.org and don't be scared of them, after all, no one can force you to do anything, and most won't even try, but they will do whatever they can to help you succeed and enjoy breastfeeding.



Good luck to the OP, I hope you are able to find a solution that both works for you and you are happy with!

[deleted account]

Sounds like a growth spurt to me, by supplementing he will nurse less, which will tell your body to make less milk. Breastmilk works on a supply & demand basis. Have you tried using a sling? with the right fit, your little one could nurse while you are up cleaning, walking, playing and even dancing with your younger one. My DD was a very high needs baby, she simply NEEDED to be close to me feel secure. At first she accomplished this by nursing, but once I started using the sling, she was able to be close to me without nursing all the time. My son was 18 months old when she was born, and had only started walking 3 months prior, he still needed me tons, and as a single mom I didn't have anyone else to help me with his needs. The sling was an absolute godsend to me as I could have both hands free to do whatever it was that needed to be done instead of having to walk around carrying her.

Cheryl - posted on 01/31/2009

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I agree with Liana,



My 1st little boy was in SCUBU for 9 days & they fed him with a bottle....this stopped him latching so I expressed for 8 weeks (didn't get off the sofa or venture into the real world).......my second son was hungry all the time, but latched on & continued to breast feed for 4 months. I introduced a bottle as well as breastfeeding & this worked well. It was hard going trying to breastfeed a newborn & having an 18 month old climbing litterally on your head to get inbetween you for attention, so partially bottle feeding helped me sort of multi taks & pay some attention to my older son.



Hope everyting works out well & take care......Cheryl (mum of 4)

Liana - posted on 01/31/2009

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Glad to help, I hated it when people tried to put me down but they aren't the ones who have to feed continually.  Good Luck :)

Sian - posted on 01/31/2009

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thank u!



i will try what u have suggested, let u know how we get on via this thread. x

Liana - posted on 01/31/2009

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I don't agree with those who are calling you a lazy nurser or say that weening is drastic at the end of the day your baby is hungry and needs feeding. 



I had the same problem with both my children you do not need to wean completely what I did was introduce a bottle feed at lunch and one at night whilst still breast feeding the rest of the time.  It helped and I was able to continue breast feeding longer and it meant that when it was time to wean it was easier as I just slowly introduced an extra bottle feed every now and then.  That way I didn't have the excess milk and the problems that come with that because it was such a gradual process.



Don't let people make you feel bad for doing the best for all your children cus your older child needs attention to and you can't do that with a baby attached all the time.  Not to mention how exhausting that regime can be.

Sian - posted on 01/31/2009

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i dont want  her on me all day! i refuse to wear a sling!



sorry it might work for others but not me!

Jenelle - posted on 01/31/2009

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I use a Maya wrap sling to nurse my baby in because she sometimes takes a long time to nurse. I can go about my business if I have things to do with my two free hands ( and arms). Try using a sling even when your baby is not eating; maybe she just needs to feel close to you.

Connie - posted on 01/30/2009

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keep trying, try pumping and when your baby is done feeding at the brest and is still hungy try feeding her the bottle, who big was your baby when she was born the reason I ask is when i had my fourth he was 9lbs and 13 oz and my midwife said that he will eat more often than others because he was so big and needed more. she is still young as she getts older she will be at the brest shorter and have longer periods inbetween.

good lunk in what you decide.

Holly - posted on 01/30/2009

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I had a preemie baby and she was the same way. After 11 months of nursing and many health issues we found out that although I was producing milk it was not nutrient rich and she was suffering from it. There are ways to have your milk checked. I am not sure how spendy it is but if you want to keep nursing it might be worth it. I wish I would have found out about it earlier. She is now two and doing well but still very tiny for her age and I believe it is because she was not given what she needed for so long.

Preity - posted on 01/29/2009

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Quoting Sian:

it seems my breast milk does not fill up my 2 month old... its squirts out during feeds so its obviously flowing fine but she wants to feed every 20-30 minutes, i have a 2 year old and not to sound un-motherly but its just not convinient, im considering weening onto formula as my health visitor advised... any ideas?



  It happened to me too . My 6 month old was not getting fill up . So ,i use to feed formula Once or twice a day and at night i give brest milk . Its easy to feed brest milk at night then the formula.Not bad to feed formula then letting your baby be hungry .

[deleted account]

Have you tried using a baby carrier like a sling or a wrap. I found that once I learned how to nurse in a carrier, running around after my 3 year old was much easier!

Gena - posted on 01/29/2009

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I totally agree with the previous post....you need to do what is best for you and your baby.  I didn't get any breastmilk in, so I never had that choice, but I get very frustrated when people assume that everyonw should breastfeed.  Formulas are very healthy and my son has been sick less than most of my friends kids that did breastfeed:)

Tara - posted on 01/29/2009

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First of all I don't think you sound "unmotherly", don't be so hard on yourself. Too many people make mother's feel bad about not breastfeeding (I'm so tired of hearing it) I had to stop breastfeeding my second child at 2 weeks old because I had a 14 month old, and was exhausted. At the time, my 2 week old, never wanted off my breast (and I couldn't pump..tried it) There was no way I could lat there and feed all day (like I did with my first) with a 14 month old running around. When my twins were born, I went straight to formula..yep ladies I let it all dry up..and I'm not ashamed of it. The most important thing to remember is that how can you as a mother take the best possible care of your babies, when your stressed out and tired over breast feeding. The formula now a days is full of the nutrients babies need, my twins are now 8 months old and as healthy as any breast fed baby out there. I'm not dissing breast feeding, I think it's beautiful and if it works for you great, but if it doesn't then STOP!!!!

Well that's just my opinion =)

Dawn - posted on 01/29/2009

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Have you tried pumping and feeding her breast milk from a bottle? that way she gets the hindmilk that's so filling, but you don't have to do formula...I am surprised that your hcp suggested that you switch... I started DD on rice cereal at ~2.5 mos...I mixed it in with b.m. in a bottle...that isn't recommended, but she was too young to do the spoon...she did great, I just had to make sure I only used a little bit, and disolved as much of it as I could in the milk...I did have to use a bigger guage nipple but she did fine.

(she was eating every hour)

[deleted account]

Have you tried going into a quiet area away from the craziness of every day. I have a 3 month old son and an 18 month old daughter. My son would not "relax" during feedings and would scream like you ripped off a toe. My daughter would get upset and the whole situation blew up!!! So I started going into the bedroom to nurse him. It's great! My daughter has learned to play quietly and not interrupt, my son is well fed and rested, and even sleeping all night long. At first it was stifling, lonely, suffocating. I felt very isolated, I felt very alone, and then he calmed down, and he got very good at nursing. Now I realize that time is short and these little moments will be something I wish I could have back in no time. He still has moments when he isn't satisfied at the breast and I still try to offer a bottle. But you don't have to wean to offer a bottle, why can't a baby have the best of both worlds?

Katrina - posted on 01/29/2009

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Hi Sian



I had exactly the same thing with my daughter Matilda, about every 30 minutes she would feed and not get full, sometimes for up to an hour.  At around 10 weeks I introduced one bottle at night and one in the morning and breast fed the rest of the time.  I found that giving her that first bottle filled her up enough for a couple of hours which gave me a bit of time with my son who was 2 then.  I think that when you have another child to look after your body doesn't have the time or energy to make your milk as good as with your first and hence they do not get as full.  The second bottle in the evening gave me a better nights sleep which again helped my milk.   I continued breast feeding until my daughter was one. I think there is a lot of pressure on mums to breast feed but sometimes it isn't always possible, so don't beat yourself up, what ever works best for you and both your children is best.  Good luck.  Katrina

Thea - posted on 01/29/2009

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I hear your pain. I had a son that always wanted to eat as well, but he cracked my tailbone when he came out so this was so painful to sit all the time. He was such a hungry hippo that he gave me hickys on my nipples which also hurt like crazy. So I slowed down breast feeding and offered him formula bottles a couple of times a day, that way I got a break, my boobs got a break and then my husband could feed him. Good luck with the transition, it definatly made my life way easier.

Kerry - posted on 01/29/2009

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I can empathize with you... but that seems to be such a drastic answer to ween. There are other options I would try before that, such as maybe supplementing. Or your baby might just be having a growth spurt and the frequent feedings will pass. Are you feeding for at least 15-20 minutes per side? This will allow your baby to get the hind milk that is more fiiling and sustaining. One last thing, talk to a lactation consultant or contact you local laleche league. They will be more than happy to discuss your problem and have more suggestions.

Sian - posted on 01/29/2009

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she feeds about 10 minutes burps... 5 minutes then isnt interested, ill then put her down(2 play with both kids) and she'll scream bloody murder and the only way to calm her down is another feed or if my partner is home he will take over, ive been told t isnt colic y a health proffesional and i should just put her on formula.. which i dont want 2 do. i didint breastfeed my son so i just feel lost! a friend said to mix breast and formula 50/50...

Emily - posted on 01/29/2009

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Hey Sian - sounds like you have a lazy nurser! I have 4, and my last baby was on the boob ALL THE TIME. Drove me nuts. She should ideally be latching on and staying on for around 20 minutes or so...the milk changes composition as you nurse and it's the "endmilk" that has a high fat content and will fill her tummy. I would keep trying. How long is she staying latched on? Don't take her off except to burp her, put her right back on. Sometimes it would take me an hour to complete a feeding at the beginning. But that definitely changed with a little time. I know it's annoying when you have other little ones, but she may not be nursing long enough at each feeding to get full. Before you put her on formula, have you considered pumping your milk and bottle feeding her? Good luck! E.

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