composting

Robin - posted on 11/26/2008 ( 16 moms have responded )

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got any bright ideas on how to get your husband to compost the kitchen wastes?

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Molly - posted on 04/17/2009

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Melissa, I did that my first try at composting- the bin/mix every once in a while. Eventually I forgot about it and when I went back it was composted! Without worms you have to be very patient, especially if there are really large items in it. However, if he's impatient, you COULD put it in the garden. you just want everything to be under the soil so as to not attract unwanted animals into your yard/neighborhood. It will give off nutrients into the soil and biodegrade.

Melissa - posted on 03/16/2009

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ok so my husband started a huge compost bin outside last summer. he keeps telling me that you dont have to do anything but mix it up every once and a while. but it does not seem to be decomposing. now we are looking to start our vegetable garden and he wants to just spread everything out in the garden space and thinks that eventually it will decompose and will help the garden. i keep telling him that does not seem right but he wont listen. can you all help me figure out what to do before he does something crazy!! thanks

Sarah - posted on 03/10/2009

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Hey Carol! I want to start a compost pile for later use in my garden. I am new to all of this. What sort of container would I use for my compost outdoors? If I start one now when would the compost be ready to use in a garden? What about the winter months, does the compost need a lid? And smell? We are in a subdivision with pretty close neighbors and no fences. We just moved here and I don't want to be the crunchy outcast that stinks up the neighborhood! :) I know it's a lot of questions, but I am trying to teach my daughter the things I never learned while learning myself as we go along!

Glenda - posted on 02/03/2009

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For clarification, the red wigglers are for the indoor bin that is placed in an air tight container?



Why should you avoid "grease, meat, dair and bones'?



 



 



 



W

Carol - posted on 01/06/2009

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I've been composting for more than 15 years....black gold for the yard & garden. I don't add worms as mother nature takes care of it all, if you only add the correct materials....grass clippings, shredded leaves, plant clippings, vegetable scraps, (NO GREASE, NO MEAT, NO DAIRY, NO BONES). Start a pile (or better yet a bin) with these materials in layers in a SUNNY spot. Throw in a small amount of dirt as a starter(that's where mother nature finds the micro-organisms to start the composting). Stir occasionally to add oxygen into the mix & water occasionally during dry weather. To minimize smells or drawing unwanted critters, it helps to bury kitchen scraps into the other materials. I do not add much paper. It will compost nicely in limited quantities but I don't believe it's healthy to add papers with dyes & inks to materials that may later fertilize my food supply. I teach "composting" through my local Master Gardeners Association so I'd be glad to try to help anyone interested.

Robin - posted on 12/07/2008

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Now on the kitchen counter is a containter and my lovely husband is using it.

:)

Twilight - posted on 12/06/2008

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i remember back in college we had a compost tub in our community kitchen and they would layer it with wet newspaper every once in awhile. why?

Mary - posted on 12/05/2008

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Get a nice container with a lid. Leave it out on the counter and at hand for when you are cleaning up after a meal. If it's convenient, he'll be more likely to use it.

Caroline - posted on 12/03/2008

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I have no idea why one would want a combo of worms, unless they are wanting to use the worms for some other purpose. Red wigglers do the job alone just fine. A handful will soon breed into an unlimited supply. These worms are pretty thin, not so great for fishing. As for plant matter- leaves, carrot scrapings, dead flowers, even shredded paper is "plant matter". But the smaller or wetter the better. It would take a very long time for worms to breakdown dead branches. Best to toss those in a brush pile for animals to nest in, or chip them into mulch. For really fast composting you can run the stuff through a blender or garbage disposal then into the bin. As for living plants, the seeds in the compost will sprout all by themselves. The plant matter worms eat are dead plants.

Twilight - posted on 12/03/2008

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i have heard of people using a combo of worms and throwing in some plant matter/plants. what other worms do you use? are they doing this mainly outside, then? are they using living plants or probably just mowed grass, dead branches, etc?

Robin - posted on 11/30/2008

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it does help you know, the earth thanks you all-every day.

love to you

Robin and family!

Twilight - posted on 11/30/2008

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great info! thanks! hopefully i can get one started up sooner than later...with a baby in the house there is always lots of wasted food thrown on the floor and stuck on her lap...maybe i won't get so aggravated if a compost bin is available

Caroline - posted on 11/29/2008

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You really need red wigglers. They eat alot more than other worms, so they can keep up with your compost. Bait shops usually carry night crawlers, they need cold for one thing, not suitable for a worm bin. I got my first batch from a lady doing a class, but killed them with Citrus after a year. The next batch I got from a friend. If you can find anyone near you who has a bin, they can spare you a handful which is plenty to start a new bin. If you can't find any PM me and I can share some if you want to pay for shipping. My bin is inside, but one does wonder if the introduction of red wigglers to the native species in your garden would have an invasive effect. The casings are full of eggs, so if you use it some are bound to hatch. Another little known fact, use rubber gloves to handle your bin material, the worms aren't hurt by you touching them, but the eggs are hurt by something in your skin. (Not that most people touch decomposing garbage without gloves by choice- smell or not!)

Twilight - posted on 11/29/2008

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i have always wanted to start a worm bin. i do not buy online, so where i can i find worms? would bait shops have them?

Caroline - posted on 11/26/2008

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Worm bin! We have one in the kitchen made from a cooler. They will compost the material down 90% so basically you almost never have to take anything out, just keep putting in more and more. Pros- not much smell, especially if you bury the scraps under coffee grounds or paper. Looks cool as anything to your friends. ;) Cons- may attract fruit flies. Never add citrus rind, it kills them. Can be started with shredded paper and a handful of red wigglers. Toss in coffee grinds, tea bags, scrape plates into it. Meat scraos may make it smell so we give them to the dog or chickens. If you need to know more about actually setting one up. I can post more. I just do not allow food waste to go in a trash can, makes them smell. Eventually you can add the worm casings to your plants if you like.

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