Growing our own food

Hannah - posted on 11/24/2008 ( 15 moms have responded )

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Is anyone else here into growing their own food? I'd be interested in talking to people who are also frustrated with slugs and earwigs ;-)

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Tessa - posted on 07/29/2009

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Always plant more than you plan to use, same theory here... some for us, some for the animals. Beer, I know works for snails and slugs. We also keep our egg shells to crush and scatter on the garden beds. Half citrus shells left from juicing, placed upside down in the garden bed will provide a hiding place for slaters so that you can find them in the morning and feed them to chooks. Toilet rolls and match boxes make a similar hiding spot for earwigs so you can dispose of them safely. As for cabbage moth, interplant nasturtiams and marigolds (calendula) with your brassicas to deter them from even landing on your plants to lay eggs. A border of sage, rosemary, dill and a few other herbs work in the same way.

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Andrea - posted on 01/04/2010

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I believe that what your kids get from watching something they planted in the earth grow is well worth the investment, Not to mention my kid's love worms and digging.

Tessa - posted on 12/17/2009

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Quoting Anna:

I'll warn you all. It's not as sustainable as going to your local farmers market especially in a year of drought. We do rain barrels on the gutters, but it doesn't gather enough for even our smallish garden - tomatoes, squash, peppers, lettuce, some native flowers. The water bill sky rocketed. At least in Louisville, we have an insane number of market options and CSAs, all of which are actually cheaper than Kroger, and it's great to support the local farmers who I'm sure have a more efficient system of keeping crops than I do. Tomatoes that produce all summer are about the only thing really worth growing on your own.


Wish I had of noticed this post before.



I completely disagree.



Have you heard of water recycling, also known as a greywater system. Combined with deep mulching, sensible planting and forethought it can all lead to sustainable self growing. Much more sustainable and efficient  than farmers in that it doesn't require chemicals and petrol/diesel powered machinery to produce.



You may need a little practise and learning to succesfully grow your own food, but these are the lessons and patience taught by gardening. Many valuable lessons that we dont take the time to learn in life itself, but are forced to take note of in the garden.



You get a fresher healthier option from your own yard that is very rewarding and satisfying in the knowledge it was grown by your own hands. Much more efficient than a farmer I think.



After the first summer, native plants shouldn't need water supplied to them at all. That's the beauty of natives.



Out here, we have no option about water. We are only on a small amount of tank water and do not have scheme water plumbed to our property thank god! We have drought 6 months of the year. Yet we have successfully grown a lot of our veggies and kept up a fruit and nut orchard of 40 trees on water recycling methods. It all comes down to sensability and wise management.



Unfortunately because we are in a drought zone area the farmers  here grow grains and run sheep instead of fruit and veg because they do have such insufficient systems for the produce of other foods. We don't have the option of farmers markets here, organic or not.



Large scale farming is not a blessing, but rather a curse on our land. Degrading it and robbing it of any goodness.

[deleted account]

Quoting Anna:

I'll warn you all. It's not as sustainable as going to your local farmers market especially in a year of drought. We do rain barrels on the gutters, but it doesn't gather enough for even our smallish garden - tomatoes, squash, peppers, lettuce, some native flowers. The water bill sky rocketed. At least in Louisville, we have an insane number of market options and CSAs, all of which are actually cheaper than Kroger, and it's great to support the local farmers who I'm sure have a more efficient system of keeping crops than I do. Tomatoes that produce all summer are about the only thing really worth growing on your own.



Just in case anyone doesn't know :~) (I didn't until this year!) it is a Community Supported Agriculture.  Basically you buy a share of a farms crops.  Some have a working option where you go and work at the farm or distribution center for part of your fee or you can take the non-working option. 



This website helped me find a CSA in my area and might be a great alternative to trying to grow your own garden or as a supplement to your own garden.  



http://www.localharvest.org/csa/ 



 

Kylie - posted on 06/14/2009

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we've got a 4 bed crop rotation veggie patch, we grow some of our own food, i've had success with watermelon, pumpkin, zucchini, squash, corn, tomatoes strawberry, lettuce, cucumber, beetroot, potatoes, sweet peas. had trouble growing celery, leek, carrots and the cabbage moths devoured all my broccoli last season...well the green caterpillars did.
we control the slugs, snails and slaters by letting our two bantam chickens out into the veggie patches for an afternoon. they sometimes eat the lettuce but mostly they seek out the bugs. We used to have a duck that got rid of all the slugs in the entire backyard, we were even thinking of hiring her out like rent-a-duck but she was also very destructive and made so much mess we gave her to someone with a farm.
Also got quite a few fruit trees: fig, avocado, orange, grapefruit, mulberry, guava, apricot, apple, mango and we've planted some bananas which are looking good so far so hopefully they can survive the winter in my backyard. the trees have all been in the ground 3 years now so they should start producing some good crops by next year. Can't wait..growing your own food is so exciting and my 4 year old loves collecting the passion fruit, and berry's. Our motto is some for us and some for the bugs.

Angela - posted on 06/13/2009

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i am growing my own food beetroot, lettuce, spuds, carrots etc i am always finding slugs all over everthing hate them i sometimes think i am living in a slug nursery i have so many dont seem to be able to get rid of them i have tried everthing nothing seems to work. drives me mad.

Char - posted on 04/03/2009

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we have a garden :)
My daughter "helps" and has her own section.
Put out milk for the slugs (works the same as beer)
I've never had earwigs..so I can't help you there

Melissa - posted on 03/20/2009

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We have a small garden/herb patch and have always visted the local farmers market.  This year our market started a CSA YEA!  We have not done the rain barrel that one of this years projects.  Any insight.  I have a 55 gal plastic barrel I rescued from the trash.

[deleted account]

We have a year-round garden.  We just got a cold frame this year, so this is the first year we've had a garden in the winter, though we haven't really had to close it up much yet this winter since it's been so warm here.  Right now, we're growing a bunch of different types of lettuces, Swiss chard, and carrots inside the cold frame and garlic on the outside.  We just used up the last of our broccoli, too.  I still go to our winter farmer's market, which is open every other weekend, though since we don't have enough space to grow everything we would need, but it's really nice having the veggies we do have in the backyard.  :)  We also have a very large rain barrel and compost pile. 



As far as slugs, we don't really worry too much about them.  I used to put out dishes of beer to catch them but that's kind of nasty to clean up and we have so many of them that I didn't think it helped very much. 

Twilight - posted on 12/30/2008

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good point. anybody interested in growing your own food should make sure it works out with water, climate, etc in their area.

i have a few herbs growing inside my house - - they do not take much water or care and it works out for everyone.

if your village, town, city, or area does not have accessible CSAs or community garden patch or a decent co-op, check out greenpages online. Also, if you have time try, to get the community organized to turn a local area into a garden/park area to grow food. :) this could be a great project for a scout or church or youth group! :)

[deleted account]

I'll warn you all. It's not as sustainable as going to your local farmers market especially in a year of drought. We do rain barrels on the gutters, but it doesn't gather enough for even our smallish garden - tomatoes, squash, peppers, lettuce, some native flowers. The water bill sky rocketed. At least in Louisville, we have an insane number of market options and CSAs, all of which are actually cheaper than Kroger, and it's great to support the local farmers who I'm sure have a more efficient system of keeping crops than I do. Tomatoes that produce all summer are about the only thing really worth growing on your own.

Angela - posted on 12/07/2008

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earwigs are nasty creatures!!! I've never seen them in a garden though :( Just in a tree and somebody I knew had them in their house - bad wood eating critters YUK.



Slugs are easy to get rid of by composting your egg shells. The shells slice their bodies and they die, you can also do the beer thing, but I've never tried it, just keep reading obout it.



Where are you located?



We just bought 6 acres and are going to grow a HUGE patch of sweet corn and potatoes. I've always had a garden, just a tiny one, although you can get a lot of tomatoes from a tiny garden! LOL

User - posted on 12/03/2008

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We have a nice veggie garden in the summer. Its about 20x20 with 8 raised beds and a compost pile. Unfortunantly it got mostly ignored this past summer as our LO joined us in July! Next summer we'll have to make up for it.

Twilight - posted on 11/29/2008

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i grew up on a farm and i miss it - we come visit every weekend, actually. and i hope one day to take it over.

i know grampa would put little trays of vinegar and others with beer out in the garden under the tomoto plants to keep away slugs.

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