Bad diarrhea problems, HELP?

Kiera - posted on 02/25/2012 ( 23 moms have responded )

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My daughter has a terrible case of explosive diarrhea. She has uncontrolable bowels, so she dosent know if she needs the loo. SHe will go to the toilet anywhere, and it quite often is all over everthing. She does this at school, and is bullied.

Her diarrhea is watery, brown and when she does it she does a lot of it. THis si up to ten times a day - imagnine the hassle i have.

We have been to every doctor possible, but when they try to examine her behind, she just does darrhea, on the doctor!

It is hell! Please (in detail) What should i do?



p.s. Me and my partner both had similar things.

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Regina - posted on 10/16/2012

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We had issues similar to this last summer with our 2 year old. Diarrhea persistently, for several weeks, every time she went #2. We scheduled several visits with her pediatrician and had to be inquisitive and on top of it. They suggested it was a summertime, too much fruit eating, problem. That didn't seem normal at all! It's not normal for anyone to have diarrhea for that amount of time. We insisted on having all the panels of tests run for allergies and things her body responded badly to. This required collecting stools, and lots of bloodwork. Nothing turned up! Finally, a different pediatrician looked at her and suggested x-rays of her bowels. The x-ray showed a block in her intestines! Some bit of her poop had formed into a hard mass and had gotten stuck in there. The only thing that could make it around this mass was liquid...hence, the diarrhea. Here's the crazy part! We were supposed to be giving her Miralax (stool softener/loosener), but the next day after diagnosis, I took her into a friend's nutrition shop. My daughter drank some green, herbal tea, with ALOE in it. She didn't like it, but drank enough to do the trick. Her blockage came out that very day and her diarrhea was gone!



Have your daughters had x-rays of their bowels done? It would be nice if their problem was as simple as this! Good luck!

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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your welcome! I read that it usually goes away on its own it can take years to do so, but it depends on whats actually causing this. You can try putting them on a lactose free diet or a gluten free diet and see what happens.

Brittney - posted on 02/25/2012

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-She could have Lactose intolerance it is the inability to digest lactose. Lactose is a type of sugar found in milk and other dairy products. This causes bad diarrhea.



You could try:



-Give a child plenty of clear fluid, like water, Pedialyte, Ceralyte, or Infalyte (for adults and children), and clear broth. Fruit juices and sports drinks should be watered down to 1/2 strength.



-Avoid milk or milk-based products, apple juice, and caffeine while you have diarrhea and for 3-5 days after you get better. They can make diarrhea worse.



-Give frequent sips of water, 1/2 strength juice (no apple juice) or a rehydration solution such as Pedialyte, Ceralyte, or Infalyte.



-Make sure the person drinks more fluids than they are losing through diarrhea. If they are unable to keep up with their losses, call a doctor.



- Rest



Have the person rest as needed and avoid strenuous exercise. Keep a sick child home from school or day care.

-Ease Into Eating



-For an infant or child, feed the BRAT diet (bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast) as soon as they can tolerate it.



- Avoid spicy, greasy, or fatty foods.



When to Call a Doctor



If you think the person needs over-the-counter diarrhea medication. Some kinds of diarrhea can get worse with anti-diarrheal medications.

If you think the person has traveler’s diarrhea or drank contaminated water and may need special medication

If the person is taking an antibiotic that may be causing the diarrhea

If there is blood or mucus in the stool

If the person is losing more fluid in their stool than they can replace by drinking fluids



-Probiotics — There are "healthy" bacteria (called probiotics) that may help reduce the duration of diarrhea (by about 12 to 30 hours). Some of these are available in drug stores without a prescription. While it is not unreasonable to use them, their overall benefit is small and they can be expensive.



DIARRHEA CAUSES



The most common cause of acute diarrhea is a viral infection. Other causes include bacterial infections, side effects of antibiotics, and infections not related to the gastrointestinal (GI) system. In addition, there are many less common causes of diarrhea.



Viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections are all contagious, and parents should use caution to prevent their child from spreading the infection. Children are considered contagious for as long as they have diarrhea. Microorganisms from diarrhea are spread from hand to mouth; hand washing is very important to prevent infecting family and other contacts. (See 'Hygiene measures' below.)



Viral infection — Viral infection is the leading cause of diarrhea in children and is seen most commonly in the winter months in temperate climates. Symptoms of viral infection can include watery diarrhea, vomiting, fever (temperature higher than 100.4ºF or 38ºC), headache, abdominal cramps, lack of appetite, and muscle aches.



Viral infection usually begins 12 hours to 4 days after exposure, and resolves within three to seven days. No specific treatment is available for viral causes of diarrhea. Children with diarrhea from viral infections are best treated with supportive measures (oral rehydration solution, limited diet, rest). (See 'Home care of diarrhea' below.)



Bacterial infection — Bacterial infection is sometimes hard to distinguish from viral infection. Persistent high fever (higher than 40ºC or 104ºF) and diarrhea that is bloody or contains mucus are somewhat more common with bacterial infection. Most children with bacterial infection do not require antibiotics and will improve with time and supportive measures, however, treatment may be necessary in certain situations.



Parasitic infection — Generally, infection with a parasite is uncommon in developed countries but may be seen in children who have recently ingested contaminated water or who have traveled to or lived in developing countries. Diarrhea from parasitic infections may last longer than two weeks. (See "Patient information: Giardia (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient information: Food poisoning (food-borne illness) (Beyond the Basics)".)



Antibiotic-associated diarrhea — A number of antibiotics can cause diarrhea in both children and adults. The diarrhea is usually mild and typically does not cause dehydration or weight loss. In most cases, antibiotics should not be stopped and the child's diet does not need to be changed. The diarrhea usually resolves one to two days after antibiotics are finished. Contact a healthcare provider if a child on antibiotics has diarrhea that is severe (see 'Frequency' above), contains blood, or does not resolve after the antibiotic is stopped.



And you can also think back...what did you and/or your partner do to help?

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23 Comments

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Jessica - posted on 10/12/2012

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You might want to have a doctor check for juvenile crohn's disease, most doctors don"t check for it unless a child loses a significant amount of weight. Because of this I myself went nine years before being diagnosed in 2005. If this is what's bothering her fish oil capsules will help a little until she can receive a diagnosis and proper medication.

P.S. My husband is lactose intolerant, but my sister is allergic to milk, Samantha sounds more like an allergy than an intolerance.

Samantha - posted on 02/27/2012

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Hi , Brittney you are an expert in this lolest goes to show you are lactose intolerant also. I am lactose intolerant too. Kiera as a mom I feel your pain. Me being raised by my gran she would make me eat porridge in the morning that usually would mean adding milk and then like all other children I had to drink a glass milk after that I would be vomitting going to the loo etc .... imagine going through all that and no one even knew about lactose intolerance back in the days.



However Kiera right now there is sadly minimal things you can do but for me as a child I ate a lot of eggs no cereal whatsoever as they are high in fibre whereas as a child your motabilism system is already fast and with this lactose intolerance somehow should you eat the slightest things with high fibre / those that are easily digested then you will be running to the loo like crazy so my suggestion is by now you should know what are things that bug your tummies as you said you and your husband are also kind of lactose intolerant. And then try recall what things did you enjoy eating as a child that didnt react with you and closely study her diet she will let you know what she likes.



Being lactose intolerant has made me realise that its not only dairy products that make you ill but certain curry powders, spices etc for me do give me reactions. I cant eat a lot of peanut butter , Im not a fan of red meat it makes my back itch etc so as a kid if my gran had known I think alot of visits to the doctor could have been avoided and many skin disease/ reactions could have been curbed. All in all I wish you all the best , your child needs you to basically do the extra work even if it takes you guys diarising everything esp her food intake then the dots will fit in and do ask her what would she like to eat maybe she give you clues . But not Pizza everyday lol ,, and some will react to the dough of the pizza as some have milk in it ... best wishes hun flour also makes me itch yet I love cakes but will suffer the conseuences later lolest

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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A little bit, I have a lactose sensitivity, so if I drink too much milk or eat too much cheese, it starts to happen all over again. I have to stop eating and drinking dairy products for about a month before it clears up entirely. I have horrible cramps every now and then after drinking milk or eating cheeses.

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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More Descriptive Than A Disease

Nearly every one has experienced it one time or another, both adults and kids. But explosive diarrhea is more a descriptive term used by sufferers themselves, rather than a medical diagnosis. It’s not a type of diarrhea but can be a warning sign or symptom of a chronic inflammatory colon disorder, allergy or intolerance to certain food types or a severe case of stomach flu caused by any of the known stomach viral infections. It can also be a symptom for a more serious colon ailment such as Ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease.



Causes and Triggers

Diarrhea and a watery stool have complex triggers that point to allergies, food poisoning, the wrong mix of food as well as contaminated food as possible causes. In many cases, lactose intolerance can be a culprit, in which case, simply refraining from drinking milk can treat it. In a few cases, withdrawal from certain prescriptive pain killers you’ve been taking for some time can trigger an ED episode. In other cases, eating with a severe mental or emotional stress can likewise prompt an ED occasion.







If explosive diarrhea becomes chronic, you need medical attention, especially if it comes with fever. It could be announcing the onset of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or Celiac disease. In fact, IBS is the most common trigger that afflicts about 20% of Americans. A simple blood test to check for gluten sensitivity can easily be done at your doctor’s clinic.



The main cause of IBS is not simple as it can be a confluence of many factors with explosive diarrhea as their common symptom. IBS is often traced to celiac disease which is gluten intolerance or the inability of the digestive system to take in some form of grains like wheat, barley or rye. But diagnosing IBS can be problematic as ED can be traced to a number of similar digestive disorders. In fact, IBS can also result in constipation which is the diametric opposite of diarrhea, characterized by a hardening of stools and difficulty in bowel movement.



Other ED Causes

One type of diarrhea closely associated with an explosive diarrhea symptom is Brainerd diarrhea. First identified in Brainerd Minnesota back in the 80’s, the condition is triggered by drinking raw or non-pasteurized milk or unclean water. You get watery stool that could persist for months on end. Then there’s autonomic neuropathy where the nerves involved in the digestive tract are damaged. This is common in people with diabetes suffering from neuropathies (progressive nerve damage on the tissues, organs, muscles, etc.). Autonomic neuropathy can trigger bacterial growth in the intestines to impair the intestine’s ability to move the food through the digestive tract and cause ED.

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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Diarrheal episodes are classically distinguished into acute and chronic (or persistent) based on their duration. Acute diarrhea is thus defined as an episode that has an acute onset and lasts no longer than 14 days; chronic or persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts longer than 14 days. The distinction, supported by the World Health Organization (WHO), has implications not only for classification and epidemiological studies but also from a practical standpoint because protracted diarrhea often has a different set of causes, poses different problems of management, and has a different prognosis.



Viral diarrhea is most common in young children. Rotavirus and adenovirus are particularly prevalent in children younger than 2 years. Astrovirus and norovirus usually infect children younger than 5 years. Yersinia enterocolitis typically infects children younger than 1 year, and the Aeromonas organism is a significant cause of diarrhea in young children.



Very young children are particularly susceptible to secondary dehydration and secondary nutrient malabsorption. Age and nutritional status appear to be the most important host factors in determining the severity and the duration of diarrhea. In fact, the younger the child, the higher is the risk for severe, life-threatening dehydration as a result of the high body-water turnover and limited renal compensatory capacity of very young children. Whether younger age also means a risk of run­ning a prolonged course is an unsettled issue. In developing countries, persis­tent postenteritis diarrhea has a strong inverse correlation with age.



Causes:

-Cholera is an acute infectious disease caused by the bacterium vibrio cholerae, which lives and multiples (colonizes) in the small intestine but does not destroy or invade the intestinal tissue (noninvasive). The major symptom of cholera is massive watery diarrhea that occurs because of a toxin secreted by the bacteria that stimulates the cells of the small intestine to secrete fluid. There are several strains of V. cholerae and the severity of the disease is based on the particular infectious strain.



Cholera is not a difficult disease to treat and most people recover well with appropriate oral fluid replacement (hydration). However, if the disease goes untreated, it can rapidly lead to shock, as a result of fluid and electrolyte loss, and to life-threatening complications.



-Lactose intolerance means the body cannot easily digest lactose, a type of natural sugar found in milk and dairy products.



When lactose moves through the large intestine (colon) without being properly digested, it can cause uncomfortable symptoms such as gas, belly pain, and bloating. Some people with lactose intolerance cannot digest any milk products. Others can eat or drink small amounts of milk products or certain types of milk products without problems.



Lactose intolerance is common in adults. It occurs more often in Native Americans and people of Asian, African, and South American descent than among people of European descent.



A big challenge for people who are lactose-intolerant is learning how to eat to avoid discomfort and to get enough calcium for healthy bones.



What causes lactose intolerance?

Lactose intolerance occurs when the small intestine does not make enough of an enzyme called lactase. Your body needs lactase to break down, or digest, lactose.



Lactose intolerance most commonly runs in families, and symptoms usually develop during the teen or adult years. Most people with this type of lactose intolerance can eat some milk or dairy products without problems.



Sometimes the small intestine stops making lactase after a short-term illness such as the stomach flu or as part of a lifelong disease such as cystic fibrosis. Or the small intestine sometimes stops making lactase after surgery to remove a part of the small intestine. In these cases, the problem can be either permanent or temporary.



In rare cases, newborns are lactose-intolerant. A person born with lactose intolerance cannot eat or drink anything with lactose.



Some premature babies have temporary lactose intolerance because they are not yet able to make lactase. After a baby begins to make lactase, the condition typically goes away.



What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of lactose intolerance can be mild to severe, depending on how much lactase your body makes. Symptoms usually begin 30 minutes to 2 hours after you eat or drink milk products. If you have lactose intolerance, your symptoms may include:



Bloating.

Pain or cramps.

Gurgling or rumbling sounds in your belly.

Gas.

Loose stools or diarrhea.

Throwing up.

Many people who have gas, belly pain, bloating, and diarrhea suspect they may be lactose-intolerant. The best way to check this is to avoid eating all milk and dairy products to see if your symptoms go away. If they do, then you can try adding small amounts of milk products to see if your symptoms come back.



If you feel sick after drinking a glass of milk one time, you probably do not have lactose intolerance. But if you feel sick every time you have milk, ice cream, or another dairy product, you may have lactose intolerance.



-Celiac disease is a problem some people have with foods that contain gluten. Gluten is a kind of protein found in foods like bread, crackers, and pasta. With celiac disease, your immune system attacks the gluten and harms your small intestine when you eat these kinds of foods. This makes it hard for your body to absorb nutrients that keep you healthy.



Gluten comes from grains like wheat, barley, and rye. It’s important to get treatment, because celiac disease can lead to iron deficiency anemia and osteoporosis. It can also raise your risk of lymphoma.



Celiac disease can slow growth and weaken bones in children. If it is not treated, your child can get very sick. Call a doctor if your child is losing a lot of weight, has diarrhea, or feels weak and tired for many days for no reason.



What causes celiac disease?

Doctors don't really know what causes the disease. Having certain genes can increase your chance of getting it. You are more likely to have these genes and get celiac disease if a close family member has it.



What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of celiac disease include:



Gas and bloating.

Changes in bowel movements.

Weight loss.

Feeling very tired.

Weakness.

These symptoms can be very mild.



Some people vomit after they eat gluten. This is more likely to happen in children than in adults.



How is celiac disease diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and do a physical exam. You may have blood tests to see if you have certain antibodies that could mean you have the disease. To make sure you have celiac disease, you will probably have an endoscopy. In this test, a doctor uses an endoscope-a thin, lighted tube that bends-to look at the inside of your small intestine. During the endoscopy, the doctor may take small samples of tissue to be tested in a lab. This is called a biopsy.



Often celiac disease is mistaken for another problem such as food intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome. You may be treated for one of these problems first.



After your celiac disease diagnosis, your doctor may do more tests, such as blood tests to check for anemia or a bone density exam. These will help your doctor find out if you have other problems, such as osteoporosis, that can arise when you have celiac disease.



How is it treated?

To get and stay well, you need to avoid all foods that have gluten. Do not eat any foods made with wheat, rye, or barley. Don't drink any beer or ale.



You can still eat eggs, meat, fish, fruit, and vegetables. Flours and starches made from rice, corn, buckwheat, potatoes, and soybeans are also okay. Within 2 weeks after starting a gluten-free eating plan, most people find that their symptoms have improved.



-Salmonellosis is a type of food poisoning caused by the Salmonella bacterium. There are many different kinds of these bacteria. Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common types in the United States.



Every year approximately 40,000 cases of salmonellosis are reported in the U.S. Many milder cases are not diagnosed or reported, so the actual number of infections may be 30 or more times greater.1 Salmonellosis is more common in the summer than in the winter. Children are the most likely to get salmonellosis. Young children, older adults, and people who have impaired immune systems are the most likely to have severe infections.



Recommended Related to Food Poisoning

Understanding Food Poisoning -- Prevention

Always wash your hands before preparing any food; wash utensils with hot soapy water after using them to prepare any meat or fish. Don't thaw frozen meat at room temperature. Let meat thaw gradually in a refrigerator, or thaw it quickly in a microwave oven and cook immediately. Avoid uncooked marinated food and raw meat, fish, or eggs; cook all such food thoroughly. Check expiration dates on meats. In restaurants, return any undercooked meat or egg products for further cooking. Ask...

Read the Understanding Food Poisoning -- Prevention article > >

What causes salmonellosis?

You can get salmonellosis by eating food contaminated with salmonella. This can happen in the following ways:



Food may be contaminated during food processing or food handling.

Food may become contaminated by the unwashed hands of an infected food handler. A frequent cause is a food handler who does not wash his or her hands with soap after using the bathroom.

Salmonella may also be found in the feces of some pets, especially those with diarrhea. You can become infected if you do not wash your hands after contact with these feces.

Reptiles, baby chicks and ducklings, and small rodents such as hamsters are particularly likely to carry Salmonella. You should always wash your hands immediately after handling one of these animals, even if the animal is healthy. Adults should also be careful that children wash their hands after handling reptiles, pet turtles, baby chicks or ducklings, or small rodents.

Beef, poultry, milk, and eggs are most often infected with salmonella. But vegetables may also be contaminated. Contaminated foods usually look and smell normal.



What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. They develop 12 to 72 hours after infection, and the illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. But diarrhea and dehydration may be so severe that it is necessary to go to the hospital. Older adults, infants, and those who have impaired immune systems are at highest risk.



If you only have diarrhea, you usually recover completely, although it may be several months before your bowel habits are entirely normal. A small number of people who are infected with salmonellosis develop Reiter's syndrome, a disease that can last for months or years and can lead to chronic arthritis.



How is salmonellosis diagnosed?

Salmonellosis is diagnosed based on a medical history and a physical exam. Your doctor will ask you questions about your symptoms, foods you have recently eaten, and your work and home environments. A stool culture and blood tests may be done to confirm the diagnosis.









Loperamide is used to control diarrhea. It is available with or without a prescription.



This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.



How should this medicine be used?



Loperamide comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken immediately after each loose bowel movement; it is sometimes taken on a schedule (one or more times a day) for chronic diarrhea. Follow the directions on the package or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take loperamide exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.



If your symptoms do not improve within 2 days (10 days for chronic diarrhea) or if you develop a fever or bloody stools, call your doctor. Drink plenty of water or other beverages to replace fluids lost while having diarrhea.





http://symptoms.webmd.com/coresc/landing...



Since you know the symptoms you can go here and it will give you possible causes.

Kiera - posted on 02/26/2012

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we have seen a bit of vomiting, and seems like her condition is similar to yours, only her poop is watery and brown. Could you have a look at my other daughter katherine, as she has similar problems, but not as bad? Maybe you could help?

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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I never knew I had to go, it was black, tarry, smelled awful, and if I didn't make it to the bathroom it went everywhere. Since I had vomiting too, I also vomited the fecal matter. I took Imodium and it didn't work right away, I had to continue to take it ...30 mL (6 tsp) after first loose stool; 15 mL (3 tsp) after each subsequent loose stool; but no more than 60 mL (12 tsp) in 24 hours. I took it for a few weeks, then it started to get better.



I would go to another doctor and ask for them to take a stool culture or other diagnostic test to determine the exact cause and the most appropriate treatment. Those can be taken home and brought back to the doctor's office.

-Source, my mom is a CMA and has worked in a pediatrician's office for 12 years

Kiera - posted on 02/26/2012

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He gave her pills to put up her ' behind' but said when she is lder she can have the proper traetment, can you describe what yours was like?

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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I've had it before, but it was associated with a bad case of the flu. I'm not a doctor or a specialist, what did the doctor say about it?

Kiera - posted on 02/26/2012

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If it helps, (yiu may not want me to) but i could send you a picture, to see if you recognise it?

Kiera - posted on 02/26/2012

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We have done all that, thanks, have you heard of any like this, if yes please describe, as it means alot

Brittney - posted on 02/26/2012

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What about an anti diarrheal, like Imodium and Metamusil to provide bulk to your stool. My suggestion would be to consult with a colorectal specialist for an exam, to receive an accurate diagnosis and treatment as deemed appropriate.

Kiera - posted on 02/26/2012

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Weve tried all that, nothing has helped, shes just got worse pooping A LOT every day

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