ADHD and Kids

Tiffanie - posted on 11/23/2010 ( 54 moms have responded )

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I'm going to take my youngest to get his checkup today and while I'm there I'm going to talk to the dr about my 9 year old whom we think has ADHD. I was very against medication for years and in denial I think. If you look at the symptoms list it says the child only needs 6 to be evaluated and mine has 18! My issue is that I know this is overly diagnosed and I get worried about drug addiction in his future. I know that the stimulants are addictive but also because his biological mom, who he lived with until he was 6ish, was a big pill popper and pot smoker. I think a lot of his ADHD "symptoms" were learned behaviors from never really having the discipline early in life and he's a lot better than he used to be. But he is constantly getting in trouble in school because he talks out, plays around, gets out of his seat and he even got in trouble the other day for running out the class to follow his friend, even though he didn't have permission to leave. He is also getting more and more forgetful. He forgets to call us when he gets on the bus, he forgets to bring his lunch to school, or if he remembers then he leaves his lunchbox there (sometimes for a week at a time even though it's at his desk and it's bright red). He forgot a bag of cookies for his Thanksgiving party in class today that was literally right next to his backpack. I don't want to do wrong by him either way. I don't want to put him on meds unnecessarily but I don't want to keep something from him that could help him either. We have tried every form of punishment from grounding to taking away tv, etc.Nothing helps. He is capable of making A's and B's but he struggles to do so especially when he's learning something new because he gives up or he goofs off and then doesn't know how to do it. Someone please give me some advice!

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Phyllis - posted on 11/23/2010

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I would get a referal to a child psychiatrist to have him evaluated. Even with an ADHD diagnosis, medication is not the only course to take. The combination of medication and therapy is generally the most successful, but therapy and certain supplements can be helpful for some kids, particularly if the symptoms are not severe. My son was diagnosed at age 4, has been on meds and in therapy since. He is doing wonderfully. Many kids also benefit from diet changes. There are lots of options. The bottom line is that he needs help and deserves to be able to have the best chance to succeed. A proper diagnosis ( be it ADHD or something else) opens doorways to education plans and other programs that will help him be the A and B student you know he can be.

Kim - posted on 12/01/2010

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Take a moment and just breathe, it will be okay. There are many different types of meds that they can put your son on if he has ADHD. Please understand that these meds only "help" the situtation not make it go away. My son is 11 and has ADHD and is very forgetful all of the time. The biggest thing I have been able to do to help him is to make a check list for my son. He has a "morning" checklist, "afterschool" checklist and a "bedtime". I know this seems like a lot of work for you but it will help keep him on track. Also know that most kids are able to come off the meds by there teen yrs. I know its tough. Good Luck

Bobbie - posted on 11/30/2010

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Sounds like a boy to me. Don't label him. Clean up his diet (remove artificial color, sweetener, maybe wheat?) My son has had plenty of bad days, could it be normal while "normal" just isn't for a boy these days?

Stacey - posted on 11/30/2010

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Never took one of the symptoms tests for ADHD but there was a time when I thought my 4 soon to be 5 year old so was Add or something because he was constantly getting in trouble at daycare -- I mean every day he "had a bad day" where there were times I would get defensive and respond with, "really? can you tell me anything that he did GOOD today?" and this is a reputable day care center -- the YMCA! So I did exactly what you are doing and checking in with his doctor. Come to find out, my child LOVES structure and rules/consistency so the freedom at daycare was too puzzling to him. He didn't know what to do with himself because there was so much "room" to be bored and get into trouble. We moved him to an all day 4K program and his behavior changed drastically. He was no longer the "bad child" he was the very polite creative gentleman that we knew!

My situation is different -- but take a look at his classroom size. Is it too large where he's not getting enough one on one attention? Do the teacher "know" how your child "ticks"? Our son was disciplined with only 1 warning at home and a 2nd warning resulted in time-outs, groundings, etc. At daycare we found out he was given sometimes 10 warnings and always ended up in outbreaks!

One last thing we learned is that our son relished on rewards rather than punishments, so we changed our discipline actions and rewarded him morresoe for the good chices he made rather than always focusing on the bad choices.

Hope this was helpful -- good luck at the doctor!

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Crystal - posted on 12/15/2010

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you want to watch how much sugar he has as well(this will not help with the forgetfullness, but it might help with the jumping out if his seat.)and yes you do want to get a referral to a child psychiatrist, they will be able to better diagnose him then a family doctor would. If it is the case where he does have ADHD, there is hope for him to grow out of it. My little brother was diagnosed with ADHD when he was in second grade (so like 8/9 ish i think???) And two years ago we took him off his meds when he was in 7th grade and did just fine.
also if this is the case, if you choose too, give him a med free vacation. (during breaks such as christmas, spring, and summer breaks) not give him his meds unless you think he needs them.

Sherri - posted on 12/10/2010

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You need to do your research Denise!! Do not tell people to go against medical advice. I have extensive knowledge on this subject as my son has ADD and we did every single thing possible and fought with this for almost 2 yrs before we broke and put him on the smallest dose of medication possible. As we were all anti medication. We will not drug our child. Guess what it has been the answer to all our prayers and his!! He has thanked us over and over that he can finally sit through an entire class and concentrate and actually is able to complete the work. He hasn't been able to do any of these things for almost 1 1/2 of school. He was so angry and frustrated thought he was stupid and worthless guess what all gone away. We are finally starting to rebuild our relationship that literally was torn to shreds from this. This was NOT a vitamin deficiency he had extensive blood work taken. This is literally a misfiring in their brain that they can not always control.

Denise - posted on 12/10/2010

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Tiffanie, Please, Please, don't put him on meds! All of Europe knows that ADD/ADHD is as simple as a mineral deficiency, mostly iron. A study was completed in France about 12 years ago and they discovered that an Iron deficiency was the connective link in 100 cases out of 100! Go to a Natural Healthfood store and talk to a Natural Health Consultant. I worked in that capacity for several years and can tell you that there IS a natural remedy that has NO negative side effects. There is a natural liquid iron supplement called "Floradix" and is from plant sources of iron and will not cause constipation. Next, consider Fish Oil with a high DHA. Fish Oil contains two componants, DHA-for the brain and EPA-for the heart. Please try these two for at least 2 months before you consider chemicals. If the biological mother was addicted to drugs during pregnancy, the child began losing vital minerals necessary for development during critical gestation stages. Even if this is not the case, children don't get enough vitamins and minerals in their diets. If you need to reach me you can find me on Facebook as Denise Bachus Larsen.

Barb - posted on 12/02/2010

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I was so glad to see your letter. My best friend has a son that is ADHD. He is now 27, married and is expecting his 1st child. My girlfriend, Sue, was fearful of addiction and all the other horror stories that go along with this. What she did was talk to his teacher (starting in kintergarden and each year after) and told them that she NEEDED their help. Sue started out each school year with him on NO meds. The teacher would send home notes weekly or sooner if necessary telling her his status. When Sue saw that he was acting up, she started him on a 1/2 a pill. She notified the teacher of this and asked that she give her any differences in his behavior and study habits. Before long, the teachers knew when he needed more meds and would call Sue. It worked out great. She also reduced his meds when the teacher noticed that he was doing better. This worked all the way thru 4 years of college. He has now graduated 4th in his class at Bowling Green in Arcitechture. Sue did have to keep on him about things like balancing his check book, paying his bills etc. but her task was easy compared with what she started out with. Please give this a try. His teachers have tried this with kids every year since him and have found out that over medicating was more of a problem then not being on meds at all. Best of Luck to you and your son. God bless you for being so concerned to ask for help

Dawne - posted on 12/02/2010

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I was very against medicating my son too. This Fall he entered the 7th grade and prior to the beginning of the school year his father and I decided to have him evaluated by a specialist to determine if medication would be beneficial for him. He was prescribed a generic form of Adderall XR. I have been astounded by the positive results. Not only is he less forgetful, your examples of your son's forgetfulness were a dead ringer for my son, but his grades that were ALWAYS Cs and Ds are now As and Bs. In addition he is more enthusiastic about going to school. I would recommend that you seek the advice in a medical professional that specializes in ADHD/ADD. I have worked with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders using an Applied Behavioral Analytical approach since 1991, and would never look to medication as the first answer for a behavioral issue. That being said I am so glad that we finally tried medication. It has made a world of difference. Good luck to you and your son.

Justina - posted on 12/02/2010

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So, you're saying he's a 9 year old boy. He has lots of energy, wants to play, doesn't want to sit still (and conform to what he is told to do- he is nine and should have lots of time to run and play!), and forgets things... I wonder why society thinks this is so abnormal? I worked in psych on an inpatient unit (but with adults) for 7 years. I advise AGAINST meds. His brain will continue to develop until he is 25 years old, and there is no telling what the meds can do to his development. I say we should start telling schools that expecting kids to sit still and listen to lectures ALL DAY may need some re-thinking, and that taking away recess and the ONE outlet kids have to get their energy out is not a good strategy for helping behavior. Do YOU like to listen to lectures and sit still all day?? Anyways, I know we can't fight the system per se, but I wouldn't put him on meds. Actually, maybe therapy would be good for him since it sounds like he had a troubled past, and martial arts classes have been shown to have great affects for "ADHD" kids.... don't buy into the hype- he is just a little boy who wants to run and play and explore his world that way. Good luck!

Athena - posted on 12/02/2010

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My son is 12 and has ADHD. He was diagnosed at age 5. Currently his pediatrician fills his medication for Adderall. We have to go in for an appt every 3 months to evaluate his growth and progress. I had him in therapy and seeing a psychiatrist for a couple of years. Therapy with medication was the best treatment. We, as a family, learned how to better parent my son. Kids with ADHD do not want to be 'bad'. They are usually very aware that their behavior is not appropriate and they often fell different from the other kids. Depression and anxiety is common with kids whose ADHD is not properly controlled. It is my opinion that not properly treating the disorder, be it therapy, medication, or both, is what will lead your child down the path of drug use and addiction. Not the proper use of stimulants. We've found that parenting techniques that were used on us, and that work for my other kids, do not work for my ADHD son. We've had a lot of struggles and learning curves, but I can finally say that we is doing well in school, extracurricular activities, and at home. Every family's experience with ADHD and ADD are different. I wish you the best of luck with your child!

Elizabeth - posted on 12/02/2010

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Hi my son was the same way he has ADHD. He has been on them since he was in grade 2. I took him of them to see if he still needed them was of them for 1 month. Got a letter from the school and was back to his old ways. So i put him back on them and he is doing really good in school his report card was very good he got some A"s and B"s.Leave a message here ans tell me what u think about them ok Bye Liz

Brenda - posted on 12/01/2010

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Hello Tiffanie, I understand where you are coming from. First have your son professional evaluated. My son was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 6. I was against putting my son on the medication, but he was doing things that was putting himself and others in danger. He would act before he thought about what he was doing. He would jump off of high objects, he would do bodily harm to his sister. His mind was firing so rapidly, he couldn't even write. Major outbursts in school. Running around in class, in the hallways. I would get calls from school just about every day. Once he started the medication, there were major improvements. He is still on the medication and receiving psychological help. Helping him to find/use coping mechanisms. I pray that once he learns and put into practice the skills that he's taught, he can be weaned off of some, if not all, the medication. If you or anyone would like to e-mail me just to vent, my email is Brendadeva@aol.com. For subject just put : Mom dealing with ADHD children. My daughter also have ADHD, but she tends to learn from mistakes a lot quicker than my son.

Jamie - posted on 12/01/2010

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This may sound weird but have you tried removing wheat and dairy from your child's diet? ADHD is so misdiagnosed......I would really hate to see your child on "drugs" for something that could be as simple as changing his diet.

April - posted on 12/01/2010

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My husband had ADHD as a child and has learned to control his behaivior. there was a time when he was on medications and he hated it. They made him feel dead to the world. The way your son behaves sounds like a child, which is what he is. Some kids missbehave in school out of boredom. my cousin was temporarily suspended from school because they wanted him put on medication to treat ADHD, which he doesnt have. If a child can sit infront of a video game or watch a movie for atleast an hour (like he would) there is no way he is hyperactive. As for forgetting things...sounds like me, Im always forgetting things seconds after ive put them somewhere. Some things are just a part of life. Talk to your pediatrician about your concerns but also just continue working with your son. he may just grow out of these habits, he may be a bored genius. (even with ADHD my husband was bored and would goof off in class often intentionally failing courses half the year and passing the other half so that he's grades amounted to a C for the year, his parents didnt realize how bright he truly was and never allowed him to take more challenging courses)
I hope this helped, even a little.

Gerri - posted on 12/01/2010

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Without reading the 40 some-odd posts after yours I can tell you this much. I am disabled and have been on medication for years. It's absolutely horrible being on medication, but at the same time I wouldn't deprive a diabetic from insulin. Have you checked out all of the alternatives to medication such as neurofeedback and/or a gluten free diet? It shouldn't be about blaming others for his behavior or disciplining him. Educate yourself and get him the help he needs.

Anjie - posted on 12/01/2010

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Don't rule out other possibilities. ADHD is only one possibility that can share symptoms with any number of other diagnosis. Make sure that whoever you have him evaluated by is thorough and checks everything. ADHD seems to be, as you said, over diagnosed. So just make you that he is testes for a wide range of things just to be on the safe side.

Debra - posted on 12/01/2010

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Have you read Dr. Doris Rapp's book, "Is this your Child"? She talks about the effects of chemicals and food allergies on behavior and learning. We use the Get Clean green cleaners as promoted on the Oprah and Rachael Ray shows. And we've gone gluten free as well as minmizing dairy and sugar. Holler if I can be of help. 913-381-8489 and here's a web site where you can get info on the safe cleaners and how to make your home healthier www.insideout.myshaklee.com/
p.s. This is my first time to share...hope I'm doing it right.

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I am a special ed teacher of young children, and I think you are making the right move to at least get him thoroughly evaluated. The variety of meds they have for this problem offer some with minimal side effects....I've never seen a child become addicted to stimulants after this... Oh, and I think you will be amazed at home much these problems improve when he is on a good medication! Good luck

Shirlee - posted on 12/01/2010

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my 2 sons age 15 and 13 are adhd..i was against the medicine but they were on concerta and still are..it is mild and helps them focus in school..plus if there identified they get that extra help in school..plus if your in canada i don't know about the states you can fill out a disability tax form and they go back to when they are born..you'll get a chunk of money and plus extra on baby bonus and income tax..time..gl..

Michele - posted on 12/01/2010

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You are doing the right thing , I have seen more self medicate because they did not receive proper treatment.

Sarah - posted on 12/01/2010

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You may be interested in the book "Sensational Meditation for Children." I am the author and know that many of the techniques have been helpful for symptoms associated with ADHD. You can find it on Amazon.

Angie - posted on 12/01/2010

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my 15ear old has been on meds for adhd since 2 grade she is now a freshman and is on the honor roll so it has really helped her i would at least talk to the dr and try what he says

Christina - posted on 12/01/2010

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My son is 12, and we had to do the Connors test at school. Then I had to fill out a questionnaire and then take it to the doctors office. My son didn't have the behavioral issues, however the forgetfullness was horrible. I would literally tell him something to do one minute and the next minute he would forget. He would get in a lot of trouble like three days in a row for not turning an assignment in, and still forget. I am a firm beleiver that you have consequences when you don't do something that you are told, or you get in trouble for missing assignments at school, so he was being punished by being grounded, or fun things being taken away. When I finally realized that this was something more than just being lazy was about the middle of 4th grade. I did counseling for a bit, and then by 5th grade conference, I was ready to do the testing and questionnaires. I felt bad that he was getting in trouble for something that he couldn't help! There are so many different adhd drugs out there now. There are at least 2 that I know of that aren't stimulant drugs. Which means when your done, you don't have to ween them off of them because of addiction. The one my son is on is Strattera. It has worked well. He finally is getting the grades that reflect his intelligence. It's not a miracle worker. He still does have the normal teenage problems, and sometimes still forgets occassionally, but nothing like it was before. Good Luck! It's a hard decision, but with the right information, and investigation, I'm sure you will make the right one.

Dolores - posted on 12/01/2010

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I know exactly where your coming from.Our granddaughter was just recently diagnosed with ADD. A must read is Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction by Edward M Hallowell, MD. I found these books to be very enlightening and I refer to often when working with my granddaughter. Right now we are in the process of finding the medication that will work best for her. It is an on-going, day by day thing. One thing that the book did give me" premission" to do is question and if I don't understand or feel that the answer fits for my granddaughter, I ask more questions until it becomes clear or I'm convinced it will help. You, above any one, knows your child. Look at all the options that are available and keep trying things until you hear or see the light bulb go on. We found that focusing on her strong, creative side, we get much more accomplished. Good Luck

Beth - posted on 12/01/2010

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You can talk to the pediatrician, but don't let him diagnose. Discuss testing with a child psychologist. I had the same problem and I refused medication but after 3 days worth of testing, I was okay with it. It's a heart breaker to dedicate a child, and many parents do that on a whim because they are tired, but I think kids suffer for it so the parents don't have to be parents. Be sure you can recognize the difference between "active boy behavior" and true ADHD. They still have to make mistakes and get into trouble, that's their job... :) We still have to protect them to a degree, that's our job. Hope it works out.

Pat - posted on 12/01/2010

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you may want to read a book called "The Indigo Children"..by Lee Carroll & Jan Tober...it is another theory behind the kids that are usually identified as ADHD ( which he could be) but this may offer some more information for you to evaluate before you commit him to medication..hope this helps...

Freda - posted on 12/01/2010

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I am going through the EXACT same thing! My son just turned 9 in October 2010. I had his school do a child study on him and I have been reading ADHD info, my child his everyone of the symptoms for it. But on the other hand my son is smart and knows when he is doing wrong, but can't seem to control it. I am not a fan of putting my child on meds either, but I'm at the point I'm ready to try it on a trial bases. If it doesn't help him, I will take him off the meds. You need to express to your doctor your concerns and fears about the meds, including what the child has went through while living with his mom. You are not along in this and you just have to put the fears aside and try to help the child. I had to do that and we are in the process of getting the ball rolling for my son. I have punished my son by taking things away, but it doesn't work he could care less. I will tell you to be prepared because there is ALOT involved with ADHD children, but once the problem is found and fixed it does get better.

Crystal - posted on 12/01/2010

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I know how you feel, My son has ADHD and I was completely against medication for the same reasons. However, I looked at the positives about it and did a lot of research and chose to put him on medication. There are some like Strattera that are less apt to be addictive. I know from research that when people this this disorder do not get help (medication, assistance through school, support from home and possibly counseling) that they become very withdrawn, negative, low self-esteem because they are always getting into trouble directly because of the ADHD. So I questioned myself...why not put him on a medication that is going to help him. I know the statistics of not being on medication and the drop out rate is high, substance abuse is higher ( to feel better and just slow things down for a little while) and suicide is higher. I would suggest the book "Driven to Distraction" it helped me a ton. Hope this helps and that I was not offensive in any way. Best of luck to you

Teri - posted on 12/01/2010

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I also have a 9yr old who has ADHD and you just described him to a T. He has been on meds since he was 6. He gets all the attention he wants and needs, but still acts up in school. The teachers have locked down the class before because she and other teachers had to search for him. He got out of the school building. He never sits in his chair more than 10 min. However, they have found that he is brighter than most kids. He learns as he sits in a corner playing with toys. He is doing 9th grade work in the 4th grade. If you can find a patient teacher to work with him that would be best. We had him tested for Asburgers also. He is just so smart that he gets bored with the same drill and kill of 4th grade, and needs a challenge. You have to think out side the box with my son. I've even had to hold his hand and make sure everything gets done right. He is the 2nd of my 4 boys to have ADHD. My eldest son is 17 and due to sports he is able to focus and be a prouctive member of society. So maybe get him in volved in sports or karate. They teach team playing, confidence and self control.

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I presume you are his foster or adoptive mom if he's not with his biological family. I am in the same position with a 9 yr old diagnosed with ADHD/Autism/Sensory Integration problems and now maybe Dyspraxia, whereas I actually think he has Attachment Disorder. Have you looked into this? It can give the kids same symptoms and behaviours as ADHD etc but is caused by brain's development problems when kids experience traumas (such as leaving their parents, being abused, neglect, violence around them) which prevents their brain from "wiring" up correctly. It results in them being impulsive, over active, hyper vigilent affecting concentration etc, which means one day they can, say, remember things like the cookies or lunchbox but then other times they cant do it. It seems to the adults that they aren't concentrating or trying, whereas they just cannot do it. Please look into attachment disorder and try some of the things practitioners suggest which help your son to manage to concentrate and organise himself and to not be so impulsive and be able to do the things which he is unable to do at the moment. I am in the UK and attachment disorder is a fairly new thing here but in the US there is lots of information to find. I am happy for my son to be misdiagnosed here as it means he has an IEP and gets some help at school to put strategies in place as if I told them he had "attachment disorder" they would not see the importance of the strategies, because there's not enough information available here for them to understand the condition. They would see attachment disorder as a problem just affecting the home relationships but that is not the case. I dont think my son needs medication at this stage although I know he may do in future, maybe in his teens but he needs help to manage himself and structure and routine to help modify his behaviour. Good luck.

Sara - posted on 12/01/2010

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http://www.brighthub.com/education/speci...

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%...

They tried to label my son ADHD, I said I'd teach him. First I taught him the way God put him together was awesome. I wonder if half of the behavior problems with these kids is feeling they are broken.

Second I taught him like everyone else he had strengths and weaknesses. Third I taught him being full of energy, adaptable, resourceful, able to focus on several different things and thinking out of the box could be used for good, but that sometimes to we have to sit still and follow rules...it's part of life...not the fun part. :)

Forth, I taught him tools to be able to sit still when he needed to. I can think on many different plains as well and don't sit still easily either....and also is my Dad. We both did well in school and have post college education. But we learned what we can do so we are not disruptive. We doodle, or we volunteer, or we excuse ourselves for a "bathroom" break...play with silly putty. Whatever we can to keep our hands busy. We get plenty of exercise. And we drink coffee and tea so we don't fall asleep when we have to sit still for any length of time. We say our bodies think when they're not moving they should be regenerating....sleeping.

And, today, my son is a sophmore in high school. So far, so good. He is getting A's and B's and taking some accelerated classes. He has a job and is a member of the track and cross country team. He's responsible and disciplined. He was never very much into sports, but we discovered when he hit puberty he needed a good bout of exercise about every 3 days or he would become moody, agressive, depressed, rebellious. Now he knows when he begins feeling that way, he needs to go out and run.

Like I said in the beginning. I wonder if the biggest diservice we do is labeling it a disorder. What kid is going to want to be agreeable and helpful and chipper if they are constantly told they were made wrong? "If they think I'm bad, I might as well be bad." None of us would want to be singled out as bad because of some personality trait of ours. Instead, I chose to say God made my son full of great things.

When he didn't do well because it's so hard to sit still, together we tried to approach it from the standpoint of a "let's figure this out" and "we need to find a way to make this work". If he broke the rules or made bad choices, he experienced the consequences as he should. Sometimes, that happened a lot.

And we tried to make sure they knew like anything else, there's a positive side and there's a negative side. Our finest trait taken to an extreme will most likely be our worst fault. So...in our house we laugh and call ADD, Attention Deficit Created. Then we thought up our own disorder for those on the other side of these traits of ours. USAD, Unplanned Situation Anxiety Disorder. Now tell me that's not the negative side of an anal, methodical, detail oriented individual.

Chaya - posted on 12/01/2010

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Not being hyperactive, I can't comment on that, but if he is, treat, rather than punish the condition

Joy - posted on 11/30/2010

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I know it's frustrating. Before you get too overwhelmed by trying to figure out what is happening medically ... look at what he is eating.
Try to take everything away in his diet that is PROCESSED and most of all, anything that is ORANGE or RED in that processed food. I'm not talking carrots and oranges, or other natually coloured food. Also cut out high sugar content like in Soda, and do not sub it with diet pop. It is possible to cut out the behavior problem by eliminating the foods that cause the problems in the brain. Eliminate anything artificially sweetened as well. IF sugar is needed, Splenda is a good alternative.
First try this, keep a food journal then check with the doctor about meds. Watch and see what happens. All I an say is try diet first as the old rule that we are what we eat is quite apparent in kids behavior problems. The next thing to check is that he is getting enough rest and make him breakfast or at least know what he is eating at breakfast.
Also ... get his thyroid checked.
Hope this helps. You're not alone. He's also at an age where things are changing in his metabolism. It can never hurt to bring all of this up with the doctor. All the previous stuff he's endured I'm sure will have a direct link to some of his cognitive functions. A lot can be controlled and cured by what we eat. I'm sure your doctor will agree with a food journal. Get into good food for the brain such as eggs, nuts, oatmeal, bananas, apples etc.
Take care!

Rebecca - posted on 11/30/2010

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I know that everyone is different, and medication is trial and error. My little brother has the same issues as well. Many people in the family criticized my mother for her putting my brother on medication.So I can relate to that aspect as well. As time passed, my brother became more adjusted to life. Years later, he even told my mom that he really didn't like himself without the medication.I would try medicines if I were you.

Cindy - posted on 11/30/2010

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It is scary to make the comittement to put your child on medication. I went through the same pain when my son was young. I finally made the comittment to put him on a low dose of Ritalin. BUT I ALSO WORKED with him extensively, to modify his behaviors. What tie Ritalin did was allow him to focus enough so that we could practice learning how to organize his world better, how to practice self control, we used Sensory integration training and lots of physical exercise, the exercise helped almost as much as the Ritalin. He is now 19, and while he still forgets things, he has been off his meds for two years, does not do recreational drugs and is attending community college...

Clara - posted on 11/30/2010

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Dear Tiffanie. Even medicine is nothing we as moms want for our children, it is also true that a lot of them help us to get a better life quality. It sounds like your child is truly a very smart kid! Meaning any help you can give to focuse will make him more succesful. I've heard some good coments about hte medicine, but I can't give you a testimony as I have not go thru this my-self (my son is 4, and has been diagnosed with Autism). However, there is a great place for you to look support: www.php.com - Parent Helping Parents, has a lot of parents going thru the same situation you are, some others less, some other worst, but there is a great team for you to get some feedback and support! God will give you the answers you need and everything will be just fine!

Lyndsay - posted on 11/30/2010

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I work in group homes with kids in care and I tell you, some kids really do need to be medicated. Personally, I am not a big fan of meds and I do think they are overrused... but there are kids who really cannot function efficiently without them. Talk to your doctor and discuss all your options.

Wolfen4 - posted on 11/30/2010

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I have one kid with ADHD and one with ADD- it took me a long time to come to gribs with it, even longer to try med's- military is very stringent with that- thank goodness. In the meantime, they had me visit nutritionists and adjust our diet- made a huge difference and I still cook from scratch these days. Stillno cookies, juice, soda's, junk- it helps allot, but in the end, it only helped to cut the med;s down , not eliminate them. I had to try different medications before we found what worked for each- each kid had different reactions :/ I learned to talk to my kids like adults when it came to ADD / ADHD - they have a right to that and understand better, are more likely to be pro-active. Same with diabetes. Taught them checkers, then chess to help their "think ahead" thinking skills. Reading became a favorite pastime even thought ADHD is "supposedly" not good readers- proved that wrong. Super smart, high energy and no excuses cut for their behavior- it saved mine, but I had my work cut out as a parent- good luck to you and see the challenge with a smile- a whole new learning curve :)

Blythe - posted on 11/30/2010

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As a parent of a child who was encouraged by teachers to be put on drugs for ADHD, I understand your frustration. There is researach linking ADHD drugs to adult illegal drug use and dependency. If your son struggles in school, I would encourage you to have him tested for a possible learning disability. Also, talk with his teacher about things you can both do about his impulsive behavior.

Sharon - posted on 11/30/2010

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First calm down!!!! He will forget so get a system of putting everything that needs to be carried in one bag. Harsh punishment for thing he can't control will make it worst. Simple one at a time instructions help. In school Have a IEP in place. That can divide assignment in small section...lots of praise for small accomplishments. Plan out rules ahead of time and the punishments. He should know what will happen when he don't follow the rules. I'm raising a 16 yrs with bad habits that I am breaking now..No meds but they might be needed soon because hormones affect some with ADD.

Kristin - posted on 11/30/2010

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I have a daughter with ADD who we have recently taken off of meds; so I am very familiar with what you have posted. However; the symptoms you suggest sound more familiar with what I have dealt with in my son, that was wrongly diagnosed at first as ADD/ADHD. My son has SID'S (Sensory Integration Deprivation) What you are discribing sounds more like this. "The Out of Sync Child" is the best book I've found on the subject. The following web site is pretty good for an initial review of the similarities and differences with ADHD/SID's. http://www.incrediblehorizons.com/sensor...

Miaesha - posted on 11/30/2010

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ADHD is NOT a learned behavior. There are some behaviors that are consistent among persons with ADHD, but they are not learned. People with ADHD cannot control their impulses, resulting in their behaviors. Be sure to have him evaluated by a professional. There are some behaviors consistent with ADHD and mere development that look similar, but it is the degree to which these behaviors or traits are exhibited. I am a mother who has ADHD and suspect that my son has it as well. I was never medicated and have managed to do fine. Punishment doesn't work for kids with ADHD, because they much prefer to be in their own company. Kids with ADHD function best with a set daily schedule. They learn best by repetition, and routine. Have him evaluated before you panic.

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As for medication I've been on Ritalin (which is horrible), Adderall, and Adderall XR. I only took it when I was going to school, so never on weekends.

There is a HUGE differance, it's almost like a fog is being lifted. You can finally access all that information that is swimming around in your head. Now I didn't have the hyper aspect that many talk about, but I was impulsive. That was something that I had to learn to control, the meds help with conentration and access data, they don't calm your kid down and make him sit still.

Long therapy sessions and a school that is willing on going that extra mile can help a child adapt without meds. But many schools don't have the facilty or the money to help.

Jessica - posted on 11/30/2010

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My son just started Intuniv. It's a non stimulate medication and I like it. The only place I found it in town is CVS Rx.
Don't beat yourself up about lack of discipline. My kids are low tone and my daughter has sensory issues. Your son sounds like my daughter, with the sensory. Bring up low tone and sensory with your physician. Think about taekwondo, the one by Smart and Final is great about discipline, excerise, and self control. When my daughter doesn't excerise, she is very forgetful and out of control. My kids swim for an hour twice a week at the Kimball pool and it's only $35 a month.

Lots of other opitions. Tell your teacher you want an IEP meeting and they have to start testing him within a month. If your physician does question sensory or low tone, set up a consulation with Sara Toga clinic. Make sure your health insurance covers OT.

Could be a number of things. Deep Breath!!

Jessica

Charlita - posted on 11/26/2010

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We recently had our DD switched to a patch. This was a blessing in disguise! She absolutely hates taking her pill in the morning! When I explained what a trial it was for her to take the Doc suggested the patch. It goes on just like the patches to stop smoking cigarettes. It has taken the stress level way down in getting her ready for school in the morning. Not only that but we saw a dramatic improvement in her focus and her work and study habits. My DD was taking concerta (time release) and we found that crushing it was actually making it not work for her. The patch is what is working for us.

Sherri - posted on 11/26/2010

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April my son learned to swallow pills by chewing a grape and would add the pill to his mouth as he was about to swallow the grape. HTH

April - posted on 11/26/2010

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Laryssa started her medication today. Friday what a bad morning I could not get her to swallow the pill. It took an hour of yelling and crying and spitting it back up. Finally half chewed it went down. I am not sure how to get her to swallow the pill we tried everything but ice cream today. I hope tomorrow will be better..

Tiffanie - posted on 11/26/2010

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At the dr. the other day they said to have his teachers fill out a Conners Test and then make him an appointment. I'm not sure if he will refer us out because he has prescribed himself for other kids we know. Once they're back in school I will call his teacher. Thank you everyone for all of your help!

Smith - posted on 11/24/2010

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i have a 15 year old with adhd an it took me a couple of years after i was told ,he was 10 yrs when told he had major adhd an sleep disorder .i thought the same no way not given meds he will be addicted an felt i would be to blame but after goin through the different meds with doctor i,m comfortable with the meds .i also asked the doctor if it ok in school holidays was i ok to lower dosage until school again so that the body doesnt get usest to the meds an the thats when dosages start toget hired an i did want that hope this has been some help as i also have a 12 yrs son with autistic spectrum disorder with speech probs an 16yrs son with high intulect aspergers so we have some moments at our house

Pip - posted on 11/23/2010

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My son is 16 and was 6 when he was diagnosed with ADHD. It was a long process from Gp's to behavioural therapists the schools had to fill in forms and so on. We at first tried therapy and diet with little effect, eventually we tried medication. We had to go through about 4 different types of pills before we found the one that worked for him (probs with side effects). He had a significant change in behaviour when he started meds. He found life easier and less confusing, he explained he could think, which he couldn't do before. The school saw a huge change in him as well, behaviour and work wise. His grades improved out of sight, everything went so well. I wasn't entirely happy about drugging him though and I continued with diet and behaviour therapy. Over the long school holidays we used to stop meds to give his body a break, and it was a good way of seeing if he still needed the meds. My dr doesn't really like kids on meds all through there childhood and we made an agreement to cease meds at around 13 yrs. We did do this and I still continue with his diet (he's not allowed processed food or preservatives). He learnt during his time on meds how to behave and he continues to do well. He is a full on child and he is still a stand out but it is alot better than he was at primary school. His grades have been maintained as well. Best of luck

Sherri - posted on 11/23/2010

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The pediatrician can do nothing except refer you to a child councilor. It is a VERY long process. You will need to fill out detailed forms, the school will need to fill out forms, he will need to meet with the councilor for a few months before they will make an accurate diagnosis. It took me from Aug until this past Tues. So a total of 3 mo's before we got a definitive diagnosis of ADD for my son. Now we have an appt. with the psychologist on Dec. 2 to discuss our options. So almost 4 mo's. It has been a very LONG road.

Laura - posted on 11/23/2010

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Relax a bit, you are on the right track! Consulting with your doctor is the first step in gaining information that will allow you to make good decisions. Most likely your doctor will recommend seeing a psychiatrist who will be the one to diagnose your son. From there you have several options--medication is only one. As Phyllis mentioned, therapy, therapy plus medication, diet changes and supplements, and behavioral modification methods are other options as well. You will be able to discuss these options with the doctor to create a treatment plan that works best for you and your son. Remember, too, that there is no right or wrong answer here--this is about finding what works best for your family. Hope this helps and good luck!

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