allergy

Albertina - posted on 04/30/2014 ( 9 moms have responded )

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My son cannot have dairy, wheat, soy, nuts corn, eggs seafood and gluten. What should I give him for breakfast?

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Guest - posted on 05/06/2014

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I have lived in several countries with government sponsored universal health care. In none of those countries were you actually denied a procedure if it was not considered necessary. You had to pay for it out of your personal income, but is that not the same as with your insurance? It is so with ours--they tell us what doctors to see and what procedures or drugs we can and cannot have. There are a lot of doctors, but no more selection than with government sponsored healthcare. If we want something they do not deem necessary, we have to pay for it our selves. The only difference is that here in the US we pay a lot more upfront.

My husband's employer did not choose our insurance for us. My husband is a contract engineer--he works for a French firm which was hired by an American company. The American company buys insurance for its workers, but they do not buy it for my husband because he is not an actual employee, so we had to buy insurance ourselves. If your premiums are that low, you must work for a large company that pays a portion of the premium for you. That is nice, but not everyone works for the big companies, so they have to pay the full price.

Sorry to take the thread off topic. I was simply worried that she might not have access to a dietitian in the US because it was very difficult for me and others I've known here.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 05/01/2014

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Then I'd have to say that your husband's insurance, as chosen by the company that he works for isn't very good. My insurance, through my employer costs me $270 a month. That's full family coverage, plus dental and vision.

Its mandatory, now, for everyone in the US to be covered under a health insurance policy, and the policy must be a reasonable one.

When either my husband or son has medical procedures done, we pay our deductable ($250), and after that, the 80% of the cost is covered by insurance. Once we hit our 'out of pocket' limit for the year which is $2000 per individual, or $3000 for the family, insurance covers 100% of any and all until the end of the year.

We have an excellent network of doctors across a tri-state area that we are allowed to choose from. We have access to world class medical facilities within a 90 minute drive.

We have in network dieticians, nutritionists, therapists, and all are easily accessable.

I'd have to say that your friend probably didn't have insurance either, at the time of their surgery. The US does not operate under a socialist system. The government is NOT the provider of everything as it is in SOME other countries. There's a good side, and a bad side to that, as there is with any system. For example, in the countries where medical is fully covered, if it's not considered essential, it may not be done. My son's condition may not have qualified for treatment in Canada, for example, and my husband's disability would not be covered under some countries' blanket government plans.

Guest - posted on 05/01/2014

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Sorry, maybe I don't understand the American system. I find many simple things VERY expensive! For example, I went to a physician for a yearly physical and my bill was more than $400! And that was just a physical--why are they charging anything for this??? One would think a government would want it's citizens healthy....
A friend of mine had to have heart surgery, a simple single bypass procedure that would have been free (well, paid for by his income taxes) in most countries, and his bill was almost as much as one pays for a small house! And his income taxes are NOT any less than they are at home.
There is insurance, which we have now purchased, but the cost is outrageous! I am here (in USA) because of my husband's job, and he pays nearly 25% of his income for insurance premiums, and they only pay for 80% of the cost of healthcare, and you can only see certain doctors, and certain things they won't pay for, you have to call and ask them which doctors you can see, and what procedures you are allowed to have, etc. I was on hold for nearly 45 minutes just to find out if the insurance would pay for our son to get tubes in his ears! You would think that with us paying nearly $1k / month for insurance they would pay for that, right? Nope. They paid for $800 of the $3400 procedure. $3400 for simple tubes! That's insane to me.

I looked into a dietician when I was looking at different diets to help my son with ADHD and while they were affordable for most upper class Americans, I could see them as cost prohibitive for many middle class Americans. Our insurance did NOT cover the cost of the dietician, so I assumed only the really pricey insurance policies cover it.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 05/01/2014

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LMAO at 'guest' who claims that the US is 'eons' behind most developed countries for medical care...

Considering we have STELLAR, world class facilities in many areas, and are sought out by physicians from other countries frequently...

There's no problem finding dieticians, especially those handling food sensitivity issues! One simply has to look, and not wait for the government to tell them who the can or cannot choose as a provider, or what procedures are or are not allwoed.

To the OP, ask your physician for a recommendation to a nutritionist that is familiar with food sensitivity. They can guide you to the best foods for your childs needs.

Guest - posted on 05/01/2014

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I currently reside in the US as well. We do have maize here, so that is a great breakfast option. Even though the healthcare system here is eons behind most developed countries you should still be able to get a consultation with a dietician. They are not terribly expensive, and some private insurance policies will pay a large percentage of the bill if you get a referral from your family doctor, pediatrician, or allergist. In fact, you could also ask your child's allergist to give you meal ideas. Most keep a databank of acceptable menus for people with multiple severe allergies.

Guest - posted on 04/30/2014

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With that many allergies, you may need to consult with a dietician to create menus you can live with.
There are many dairy, wheat, and gluten free substitutions you can buy for him. There are also many foods that do not have those ingredients, but I'm not confident in nameing them. A dietician can help you create a menu though.

Truef - posted on 04/30/2014

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Do you have maize in your country? Sugar and butter makes it very tasty. My kids eat this every morning and never complain about it being boring.

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