Anyone have experience with IQ testing a 6 1/2 girl in California? What tests would you recommend or not?

Carrie - posted on 06/21/2013 ( 51 moms have responded )

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Our daughter has been advanced from an early age, she taught herself to read at 2 1/2, and i mean READ books, not memorize. This was our first clue. She has been in preschool where they advanced her as much as they could and said upon leaving, "Don't be suprised if they want to skip a grade with her". When registering for K they offered a voluntary test where she was off the charts on every subject. She spent her first year in public school in a K-1 (1st gr. dominant) class, one of 6 kinders. She has only done 1st grade and above work and stayed at the top of the class all year. We have enriched her learning all along by doing Dance, Gymnastics, Music, Violin (yes, they make violins that small!), and extra math online which she thinks is games. EVERY teacher that has come into contact with her says she is VERY ADVANCED and wants to move her forward because she gets it so quick and can move on. Now back to school, and the Principal doesn't want to advance her because in her TWO experiences in her career of advancing a child, 1 of them needed attention at 4th grade. We have an amazing support system in our family, her 2 grandmothers volunteered in the classroom all year, 1 of them every wednesday spent the entire day volunteering in the class all day and never missed a day. I was their Arts Attack teacher all year. I could go on and on, but we are at the point where the principal is refusing to even entertain the idea of advancing her because now "it's too late", mind you the teachers' recommendation to advance her was submitted 3 weeks ago, whereupon we immediately requested a meeting with admin. and were told they would let us know. And there the sticky note with our name and number sat, and sat, and sat. She has finally granted us a meeting on Monday, but has already taken the stand that she will not advance our daughter and that next year as of October that all the students will have their own iPads to accelerate at whatever level they want. Ok, so handing my daughter an iPad and saying go for it is the answer to teaching now? What about what is being taught by the teacher in the classroom that she has already heard for an entire year and mastered?? What about the fact that she has spent the year with children only 5 weeks older than her and has developed close friendships with them? I'd hate to think that my daughter is being used as a way to keep the 1st grade scores up for the school...and yet this is only scratching the surface.

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Colette - posted on 06/24/2013

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Without knowing all the details, let me start by saying if you have not heard this already...Providing continual stimulation will be number 1 throughout your daughter's education. My daughter who is now 22 years old was also READING at 2.5 - 3. She read to her class daily in Kindergarten and 1st grade while the teacher graded papers or took care of other tasks. She was a natural teacher and according to friends throughout her life, she has always been on the "bossy" side! :)

K & 1st, she went to a parochial school, but it was apparent by mid 1st that they would not be able to provide the stimulation she required to keep from being bored and inevitably getting into trouble. Test scores were off the chart in every subject tested!

After speaking with several folks within the education field including gifted, I decided to have her tested for entrance to an alternative school (Montessori). Of course, she passed with flying colors and they jumped at admitting her. She attended Urban Community in Cleveland, Ohio. I really liked their approach, though not listed specifically as Montessori, it is the Montessori philosophy that is followed. She was able to advance at her own pace and if they did not have the material required, they would bring it in. During her 6th level, she completed both HS Pre-Alg. and Algebra 1! I'm not a Math person, so this was really astounding to me!

They provided her with experiences she would not have had at a regular school whether parochial or otherwise. She was very involved in sports and theater from 4th grade through high school. She volunteered at our local hospital while carrying a full load of AP classes throughout high school. Upon graduating from high school, she already completed most of her general education credits and was able to enter college at a junior level...

Skipping grades is not always the best thing because you must look at the social impact and whether the maturity level of the child matches academic ability. IQ tests are not indicative of successful outcomes without the continued stimulation in all aspects of life.

The social aspect, while not necessarily important at your daughter's age, will eventually be important when she is a teenager. One grade may not seem like much now, but there is generally a huge jump in maturity between grade school and middle school.

My daughter was/is brilliant, but she was always on task with regard to maturity...regardless of how many extra-curricular activities she was involved in or how high her test scores were.

It's been my experience, that often when there is a high level of intelligence involved, there is also a higher level of self-failure, especially as an adult because of the level of perfectionism within the individual and lets face it, life is not perfect. When faced with that realization, it can be devastating or it can be an incredible learning experience.

Having a gifted child is very similar to having a special needs child, in that they both require an increased level of stimulation. I also have a 12 year old son with Aspergers who is highly intelligent, as well...132 IQ...couldn't find his way out of a paper bag..but maintains mostly A's and a couple B's. I'm told, after extensive cognitive testing that amongst other areas, he tests in the superior range for problem solving...I'm not sure what the magic thing is that I have to do to get him to solve a problem, but I sure the heck haven't figured it out in 12 years! hahahaha

My son, though a fabulous soul, is a challenge to my balance! Where my daughter was over the top social, he has the desire, but peers just don't get him and he tries so hard to fit in, but he just doesn't and so I end up being both his Mom and his best friend. We are working on that!

Good luck to you and don't settle for a mediocre educational system.

Connie - posted on 06/23/2013

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My son was like your daughter, extremely gifted at an early age. We did not advance him on the advice of our GT teacher who said he socially needed to be with his peers. I also attended a lecture when he was in elementary school that told me to remember he needed to be a kid first. Great advice. His natural curiosity and love of learning kept him satisfied in public school. He graduated valedictorian, National Merit Scholar, with a full ride scholarship to college where he is getting straight A's. I wanted him to develop fully as a person not just be a smart kid but a well rounded person too and it has worked out for us. I'm glad I kept him in school because he is a people person and a natural leader and wants to become a teacher.

Autumn - posted on 06/23/2013

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I would homeschool and use an online curriculum that you do not have to explicitly teach. I'm a special ed teacher and I share a room with the academically gifted teacher. Most places don't test or place AG kids until 3rd grade anyway, and once they do, the kids are still held to the same standards, they just get more enrichment. If your child is truly that advanced, she will be bored quickly. A homeschool environment will allow her to learn at her own pace, which really is what each child should have.

Tara - posted on 06/23/2013

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I am an elementary school teacher in Canada. We never advance our students. Many studies have shown that it is not good for children socially in the long run. Our school system strongly believes that all students learn at different paces and your child's teacher and admin. are responsible for programming for your daughter. It seems like they have worked very hard to make an individualized learning plan and to move her forward but also be able to remain with her same age peers.
I am a mother of a very bright child. We enrich his learning with extra curriculars and at home by nurturing his interests. Have faith in your child's teacher, your abilities to enrich your child's life and give her the time to make friends, bond with children her own age, and to simply enjoy being a little girl. Childhood goes way too fast...

User - posted on 06/24/2013

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I have a grown daughter who also read at a pre-school age, and as a teen tested with the I.Q. of a genius. I am grateful we did not advance her in school, simply because functioning at a social level is a whole new ball park for young kids who are ridiculously smart. Are you able to stay at home and home school her? We've often looked back and wished we'd done that, thereby enabling our girl to enter college classes by age 15 or 16, and get her under graduate degree early on. There are some rather significant studies out there that back up not advancing children, regardless of academic capabilities. Is there another school in your town that would entertain what you want to do? Have you made appointments with Principals to discuss this? What are your options by junior hi age? Can you have her prepared to skip classes by then, and at an early age take a college class or two? I don't see this as a lose lose situation. And if you work, can you still home school her in the evening? It only takes a couple of hours to get through a curriculum with a very bright child. I'd really consider it if I were you. Then she could take her GED at 15 and move on, and you'd all be happier.

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Linda - posted on 06/25/2013

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Carrie,
So many replies! It's wonderful to have a gifted child, and yet causes so much angst, because we want to ensure they are being challenged. I have 6 sons, and had decided with their father- a well educated career teacher- to allow them to maintain their grade levels, while we would provide a rich LIFE experience for them.
I am so glad we did this. Often, IQ is set high above other aspects of life. I also was a very high IQ child. The greater gift is time spent with you and her father, knowing your love through simply enjoying life together. Going on adventures, letting dad teach his life skills, you giving time to talk with her and explain life... this matters more.
It is my very strong belief that while we want to allow the maximum academic opportunity, a child who is secure in their knowledge of parental love through time spent gives such solid ground, that the ability to learn and grow, willingness to take risk, and at the same time be socially comfortable accelerates their ability to achieve as ADULTS exponentially! A child needs play, rest, hugs, and to know you will stop being busy, and do things with them. For instance, packing a picnic & blanket, with the most terrific things to eat, and just playing at the park, resting in the shade of a tree, and not having a time limit.
My children lost their dad a few years ago very unexpectedly. While they have such great admiration for his knowledge and skill, their best memories are of time spent doing the father-son things. Working, playing, traveling.
A different perspective for you. Relax, and allow your daughter to enjoy the time you have her, and ensure she realizes THIS is your highest priority. No disrespect intended at all... I was caught up in these things when I was a young mom.

Enna - posted on 06/25/2013

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My daughter is the same age, and we have some of the same problems. We tried to get them to put her in first grade last year but they wouldn't because they had too many kids (that's not the reason they told us, but that's what her teacher said.) I would love to have her skip one or two grades, but no more than that, for social reasons. She's really tall and big for her age, so she would fit in.
We've always done extra work with her in the evenings, which I think is actually making it more difficult for her at school because she just keeps getting further and further ahead. I've thought about homeschooling her, but I really think she's better off in a classroom environment. She spent a lot of time helping the other kids and doing extra stuff for the teacher.
I'm not really sure why you would test her IQ, etc except maybe for bragging rights :) I'm sure the principal knows how smart she is. Sadly, kids who aren't doing well get passed on to the next grade, and kids who are smart are stuck in grades lower than they deserve. I'm not sure why the principal wants to keep her back, but the guidance counselor at my daughter's school was actually the one who makes those decisions.

Natalie - posted on 06/25/2013

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Hi again. I spoke with my son who was skipped and graduated at 16. He did not like being skipped. He did get into a top college but, he says, Harvard and Princeton, and Yale are full of students who weren't skipped. These kids were tops of their classes AND went on to be student council presidents, soloists in the local orchestra, leaders in their community, writers of novels, etc. My son wished he had had that kind of time.

Bright kids in elementary school feel their difference the most. As they move on to Middle School and High school others kids may or may not be as quick to learn new material, but at least that material is in common. And a motivated child/parent can always find more.

As to IQ testing, it may not be so important at age 6 /12 unless your school system needs it to qualify her for GT classes. What you do have is a very bright and talented daughter. Her reading ability and motivation are evidence enough. If the school cannot provide enrichment or pull-out opportunities you still have options. Many moms have suggested Montessori School (we had great success with that but I understand it not an option for you), home schooling or public school with home enrichment, or the right private school.

I wish you all the best.

Amy - posted on 06/25/2013

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I have not read many of the other comments but have you checkef into home schooling? This way she can progress st her rate. With tht extra classes she's taking she will continue yo learn social skills. Also there maybe a home schooling group in your area that have get togethers and do field trips ect...

Colette - posted on 06/24/2013

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Montessori is not for everyone. My daughter excelled and continued to do so once in high school and is now working on a Master's in Chem. My son on the other hand would not benefit from the lack of structure in a Montessori setting. Good luck to you on your journey.

Carrie - posted on 06/24/2013

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Wow so many comments, so little time! So I am just going to have to reply en masse.
First of all, our daughter's social and emotional deveopment has been the primary reason we didn't pursue advancing her straight into 1st grade. We wanted to see how she handled herself in public school with 30 other students per classroom. Please keep in mind, she has spent this year in a K-1 combo, she was one of 6 Kinders in the class. We are only asking that she progress with the same class, especially since statistics prove that advancing at an earlier age/grade is far better than waiting until 4th grade or higher. We have asked all of her teachers how she has been doing socially/emotionally all year and they have all said she plays with the older girls, has great confidence, is extremly helpful in the classroom, shows independance and can "hold her own" if she needs to.
Our daughter too, like many of you, would read to her preschool class while the teacher "would get so much work done!"
Montessori is not an option, one of her grandmothers has had a career in education incl. owning her own private school for 30+ years and has always been opposed to Mont. methods of teaching and lack of structure. I have 2 nephews (on the other side of the family) who attended Montessori their elementary years and needed tutors the rest of their 6 years of school because they were never taught how learn.
All of the schools in our area are over crowded and if you don't register before the year is over you are faced with being sent to an "overflow school" out of the area or pay through the nose for private school. I met several parents on the first day of school who were left wandering the black top with their child not knowing if they were assigned a classroom or had to drive to another school they were unknowingly sent to!! Imagine what a nightmare that must have been for them on the first day of school! Sorry, sidetracked.
I don't want to start venting all of my frustrations with schools here, I just thought I should address some of the comments that reflect legitimate areas of concern that we have already weighed.
I do have an appointment with the Principal today, and hope it goes smoothly. I know this will probably be the first of many.
I Appreciate sincerly all of your well wishes and will continue our path to get our daughter the education that she deserves!

Rena - posted on 06/24/2013

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I personally was streamed at school. I took 3 grades in two years and was then put directly into grade 4. I, personally, would never do this with my child. I don't fault my parents or the school, but it was terribly difficult socially. I was streamed with two boys (all three of us were far ahead of our class academically, so it made sense). The problem was that when we were moved we got attitude from the grade we left behind, and attitude from the grade we joined. (You think you're so smart??...type of thing.) This was in a small school, so perhaps in a larger anonymous school setting it may be easier. The ironic part of this is that of the three of us that were streamed one dropped out in grade 9 and left town with the rodeo, one ended up in trouble with the law and died (accidentally) at a young age, and I (although academically able) never went on to post secondary education. This is just my experience, but I do think it warrants a lot of consideration before making this choice for your daughter. Best of luck... I am sure she will do well no matter what you choose to do.

Deanelia A. - posted on 06/24/2013

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My first recommendation would be to look for a Montessori program in your area. This is a program that allows students to progress at their own pace, and since she is such a self-starter, I believe that would be the best for her.

If not that, do you have open enrollments in your area? If so, I would meet with the principals of the other schools where she could attend and see what their take is on this issue.

I am 59 years old, and kindergarten was not mandatory when I went to school - but because I too, taught myself to read at about 3 years old, my mother sent me to kindergarten, thinking it would enrich my studies. I was summarily expelled for doing not only my work, but for "helping" all my friends do theirs!

It was proposed that I be skipped ahead at least one grade, maybe two, but my parents declined. As you are aware, there are pros and cons to both. I was lucky enough to have teachers who had the time and initiative to keep me challenged in school - things like tutoring others, teaching certain segments during the school year, etc. I realize that it's really not possible to expect that type of thing now (I'm 59 years old) - which is why I believe that a Montessori school is your best option.

Kathy - posted on 06/24/2013

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The social skills issue is a must to consider. Taking a very young child and putting them with older children often causes more problems than letting the kid stay in their own age kids class. I would recommend doing online classes with her on your own time, or perhaps putting her in a Charter School. My daughter moved from a Public School with a student body of 5K students to a Charter School with a total student body of 150. My daughter was the victim of bullying and that is why we moved her...but there are other reasons one being their child is ahead of their class that they move to Charter Schools.

Tracy - posted on 06/24/2013

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I suggest homeschooling her with lots of extracuricular activites - as you have been. It's obvious she is advanced because of the enrichment from the family. So why not look at homeschooling?

Regarding IQ Testing, the most accurate tests for potential are interactive and require quite a bit of training. But why are you wanting IQ testing? What's the purpose or benefit? Just curious. Wanting to know her short and longer term potential makes sense though. I can help with that. I'm in Los Feliz - Los Angeles. Tutoring 30 years now.

Tracy

Vicky - posted on 06/23/2013

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We had some luck having our son tested privately by an educational psychologist. You would find out her IQ and also get some really good advice.

Evie's - posted on 06/23/2013

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I took an IQ test (in California) in 5th and 7th grades with the school psychologists. Even though I scored 128, they didn't want to advance me to another grade, but encouraged me to join the GATE program. I didn't join for whatever reason (can't remember), but I played the violin, and put my extra studious energy into that.
Perhaps extracurricular activities can take on her boredom?
In high school, it's different. She can take college courses outside of regular school hours and graduate early, as my husband did. And he had no problem being 17 and a freshman in college; he was at the same level as everyone around him at that point.
Private schools work differently. If it's affordable, I would talk to a child psychologist, and see if grade advancement through a private school is the best way to go.

Ginger - posted on 06/23/2013

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I'd like to add that children should be educated on their own with our (a parents') guidance rather than being "schooled" by an institution. Also, unless you decide to homeschool, your daughter will be stuck in the same vicious cycle year after year.

Rivka - posted on 06/23/2013

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Well, Most thought upon issues as you're dealing with is that there will be a social problem because of the age difference in the class.
In Israel, most of the time children are not advanced so much during grade school, maybe skip one grade. But go once a week to a center run by the university for a day of advanced work and meet there more children like themselves. Israel does the testing around second grade to all the children in the country.
By junior high school an advanced child could find places that will get them into a degree program from 8th grade and still learn with children closer to their age during the week.
Personally, my children learned to have patience for others shortcomings, life is what you make of it, motivation gets you places. My eldest did University courses during high school and preferred her social life, every math marathon space marathon she enjoyed tremendously. took piano lessons, my second daughter took up violin and we put her in an ivy league high school (expensive!!!). every program that promotes her she goes to.
The social aspect of the advanced child is much more important than pushing them quickly through school. Enrichment can be given beyond school. Try and see if there is the day university program in the US like in Israel.
My other children have issues that confuse the system - ADD, needs a small class but is above his class in academics (classes here are 30-45 children) so he was put in an "emotional class of 14 children. My next son has PDD and will not learn math at school so we send him privately to a mathematician and he does work way above his age group. My third grader is on the verge of boredom, but he has a rich social life. The younger one are small and are still in preschool. My preschool...
Good luck,
Rivka

Mindy - posted on 06/23/2013

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In Texas Kinder is optional, can you just enroll her in 1st with the documentation from the preschool? Gifted and talented students are tested automatically here in Kinder using the Raven but there has been some concern for those who are advancex but have learning disabilities. I agree with a fellow poster do not entertaine the principal this is your child and her future so push. I removed my gifted students from public and we homeschool now. It was a challenge as I was finishing up a degree and interning for my therapy license but worth the time as they are off the charts in 6th and 8th grade this year.

Kellie - posted on 06/23/2013

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Have you considered a Montessori school? That would allow her to work at her own pace until she is a little older, and then around 6th grade you can see what would be the placement for her, academically and socially.

Brenda - posted on 06/23/2013

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if you take your child out side school an have her tested by a psychologist,(the schools in my state S.C) has to adhere to what they say,check your state out and see if you have this option,mine was learning problems but I would think that it would include a child too smart to stay in a class room that dosnt fit their needs and by the way if you have any issue with the school you have only 140 days to start the court process,just thought you need to know that,again check your state.GOOD LUCK,

Mavis - posted on 06/23/2013

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The WISC IV (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children 4th edition is a great IQ test. Done in conjunction with an achievement test like the WRAT4 (which gives grade level equivalencies) or the WIAT you should be able to see if her education is not allowing her to achieve at her potential. However, I would advise that skipping grades can wreak havoc on social skills development and sometimes early high achievement is not indicative of lifelong high IQ. IQ is not thought to be stable until around age 7 or 8.

Heather - posted on 06/23/2013

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I was skipped 2 years in grade school. Email me if you want some info/advice. My mom is now the president of her state gifted education association, and also has info.

Natalie - posted on 06/23/2013

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How exciting and wonderful to have a child so gifted and self-motivated! There will be many challenges ahead to make her schooling the right fit.
I have three children, at various levels of gifted. My oldest, a boy, was bored in 1st and 2nd grade because he was so advanced in reading and math, but we supplemented at home. Our public school is very tiny - the grades are combined (1/2, 3/4, 5/6, 7/8). They thought they could just have him work ahead with the older kids. They finally skipped him after 3rd grade where he still excelled and was bumped ahead (yet again) in math. He graduated at 16, having taken all the AP classes our high school offered, and was accepted to a top college. Yet he insisted on a gap year. He felt he never "clicked" with the older kids and wanted to start college with kids his age.
Our second son was identified as exceptionally gifted. At the beginning of 4th grade he tested 4 1/2 grades ahead in math, which means he got questions correct on material he had never had (like calculations with fractions). My second son did not want to skip. He desperately wanted to fit in socially, and that is still his greatest challenge. We've provided him with online courses through John's Hopkins in middle school, and summer programs at top colleges now that he is in high school. At our public high school he finds himself gently challenged academically and he prefers it that way.
My youngest is a girl. She was skipped during 1st grade. Since our 1/2 is a combined class she just did all the 2nd grade work after the first few weeks. Socially she has been fine with skipping - it was actually a better fit for her than her same age peers. But she struggles (in her mind) to fit in and tries to not look too exceptional. She bristles when I suggest reading material or try to explain things to her (unlike her brothers). She just doesn't want want to stand out too much.
So while I believe in keeping kids academically challenged, listen to your daughter's social needs as well. My niece graduated from college at 18. That really worked for her, but it would have been painful for my kids.

Kyle - posted on 06/23/2013

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Also, something else you may want to consider. If you do advance your daughter, she is going to be associating with girls quite a bit older than she is. That may not mean much right now. But when she is 10 and the girls around her are talking about periods and boys and boobs, is that what you really want her exposed to so early? Girls are forced to "grow up" so soon these days. I played with dolls until I was in Junior High. I think that is unheard of now. I talked to a mom friend who was skipped and she said she wanted to date when she was 14 because all the girls around her were talking about dating. She gave her parents a lot of problems asking for privileges she just wasn't ready for. Keep your beautiful, intelligent little girl a little girl as long as you can.

Ginger - posted on 06/23/2013

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HOMESCHOOL her!!! She will NEVER be challenged enough in a traditional school setting. If you simply advance her through higher grades, she may lose her desire to learn and not "fit in" with the older kids.

J - posted on 06/23/2013

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Skip this stupid principle (they are not experts) and GO TO THE BOARD/SUPERINTENDANT). You must look out for your child! You are her best advocate!!!

Barbara - posted on 06/23/2013

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I'm a mother of 2 grown children, girl oldest, boy youngest. Our daughter caught everything just as fast as her father does. He's super gifted in math. She got bored really easy so he actually half taught her at home with her math and along with some Karate' and other extra curricula activities, she is a happy mom of 2 and now her 10 year old son is AB Honor Roll and our little 2 year old (2 next month) is like your daughter teaching herself to read. She picks up books everywhere she goes and although she's not all that verbal quite yet, neither was her older brother, she is smart as a whip just like her mommy. Don't succumb to the school authorities, you may have to take it upon yourself to teach her at home and maintain a combined curricula with some extra -curricula activities for her to form friendships at school. Here in VA we have what is called the International Baccalaureate program for gifted children and our neighbor's daughter was in that. She was learning Latin around age 12. It all depends on the child. By all means keep them engaged with bi-brain (both sides) of activities in arts and language and sciences. Just remember, you are the mother. YOU know what's best for YOUR child, period. Follow YOUR instincts. Good luck and keep us posted.

Elizabeth - posted on 06/23/2013

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Get your daughter tested - why not! But do her a favor and keep her with kids her own age. Find a school with programs for gifted children. I speak from personal experience. I graduated high school at 16 and finished my MBA at 21. A well and good but emotionally, I was behind everyone and was frustrated because I didn't always "get" everything. Then, I couldn't drive, couldn't go out, etc. When I was younger, the other kids made fun of me because I was the youngest; quite frankly, my age was something I had to deal with throughout grade school. I wouldn't put my kid through it.

Lisa - posted on 06/23/2013

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I'd like to give you one more vote for homeschool. As long as you make an effort to keep her involved with peer activities, it can be very rewarding for an intelligent child. My sons may not be as bright as your daughter, but I have a 15 year old taking college classes for half the day. He is having the time of his life!

Really smart kids often have a hard time socializing, anyway. So it seems dubious to me to keep her in an unchallenging academic environment for social skills that may or may not appear.

If that is just not something you can do right now, I would consider going to the special education department (or whomever handles the smart kids) in your district. They will hook you up with age appropriate testing and will let you know what programs your district offers.

For example my county offers a scholarship to special education students (both the really smart and the challenged in my state) to attend private schools in the area. There might also be a magnet school where she will be better served.

Don't let yourself get hoodwinked into believing that your neighborhood school is the only option. Keep looking.

Teresa - posted on 06/23/2013

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My oldest started kindergarten at 4 turning 5. Very advanced. In first grade she was split 1st/2nd grader and had behavior problems in 1st grade class...she was bored. She went completely to 2nd in the second semester. Her state scores were all 99the percentile,

Shannon - posted on 06/23/2013

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Congratulations on having a very smart and well developed child - but to keep her that way - you have to look at her maturity level too - if you push to advance her too quickly you will have a very young girl in class with much older boys and girls whose social behavior will be more advanced than what you want for your child. if you cannot afford private schooling - somewhere for gifted or highly intelligent students. you may want to look at home schooling then" in home" tutoring as her level of learning advances over what you can teach her. keep her in social activities to keep her well rounded and making friends.... public school systems are not responsible for your childs future (unfortunately) YOU ARE. take charge and do it yourself... the negative energy you spend on it now- should be turned around and put into a positive future for your gifted child. We kept our gifted Son in public school with peers his own age - he is in grade 6 now, still top of his class (of course) and busy with extracurricular activities - we keep him stimulated with lots of interesting topics outside of school, and his extremely intelligent father also teaches him mechanics, architecture etc.. keeping his little brain growing and learning all the time! Good Luck,

Windy - posted on 06/23/2013

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I agree with Tara. Have faith in your child's teachers and let her enjoy being a child. I have seen children pushed ahead and I have seen the burnout that can sometimes follow from being pushed to hard. I have also seen very bright children placed in first grade who are so young that sitting still and following directions is very difficult. Their age can sometimes make it hard to emotionally relate to pears. However if you feel that emotionally and academically your daughter is ready to skip a grade, you know your child better than anyone else, don't take no for an answer.

Charlotte - posted on 06/23/2013

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Public Schools must follow the concept of providing everything for a student to learn. Our schools have aids for children who cannot make make it through the day on their own. Remedial classes for those who have fallen behind a bit, classes for the blind and deaf or any student who is not handling the "normal age level training". Now your child is on the other end of the spectrum, but in the same boat. She is not handling the norm because she already knows it. As one mom here has already mentioned, go to the school, gather the teacher, principal, the counselor, and any others who may help. Get them to set in motion a plan just for your daughter. A type of Gifted and Talented program just for her. If they need to hire a special aid for her, so be it. It the teacher needs more help preparing and grading the advanced work, the school board is required to provide it. Your child is as important as any other child in the system. Keep pushing and fighting for her.

Brenda - posted on 06/23/2013

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We homeschool for this reason. K12 would be great but I also didn't use this because it requires so much everyday that we can't do the fun things with other homeschoolers. We use Time4learning online. They teach you the lesson with fun kid videos and they do the work. Time4 learning keeps all the records for the parents to see. You have to pass the test then you can move on. I don't do much myself but do add a little extra to schooling. This program allows you to move on at whatever pace the child needs. If a parents works you can have them do it whenever there is time. You can also do one grade in one area and if need to advance in another area you can do that also. My son is 7 years old and is at the end of 3rd. gr. We only spend about 3 hours a day doing this and I may add another hour in if time. We do outside things like Spanish, Latin, swimming, basketball, homeschool co op classes and ETC. Use the grandparents to help do a day like they are now. This isn't as hard as it sounds.

Kimberly - posted on 06/23/2013

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IDEA (the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) states that children have the right to a free and appropriate education (FAPE). Although this act is most often used in relation to children with disabilities, I believe that it also references gifted children. I think you could find some of the information you are looking for by doing an internet search for "FAPE gifted" or "IDEA gifted". This site lists policies for gifted education by state: http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=37

Tami - posted on 06/23/2013

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When you talk to the school tomorrow, you might want to ask them to see if the district has a Charter school. Usually as they are part of the public school district, they are free. The schools are set up for the gifted child and to help your child be successful at what ever level the child is on.

As a side note, I know you said you can't homeschool, but California is very supportive of homeschool. They have programs set up for the parent (or grandparents if parent is working) to take child to, for science, computer etc labs as well as a teacher test on a yearly basis how the child is doing. It sounds like you already are homeschooling. Since grandmas are helping in the classroom, maybe the time they would have spent helping, could be used to help your daughter with schoolwork so you don't have the full responsibility or if you work, you can still have the best of both worlds. Best of Luck in working with the school. Remember - this is your child, you are the parent and the school HAS to work with your wishes.

Jolene - posted on 06/23/2013

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I do not ever remember learning how to read or being taught how but I walked into Kindergarten fully reading. I was at the college level by the 2nd grade. I skipped the 5th grade and it was a HORRIBLE experience. There is always academic material that is missed and no one may know or notice it until the student is struggling. The other issue is that well-meaning family members and educators make alot of assumptions about what the student is capable of and put on a great deal of pressure. I also agree with those who said the age difference can be huge. I think there are plenty of ways to challenge a smart student - but PLEASE don't just make her world about academics and the arts. Also make it about fun, friends, and plenty of downtime.

Renee - posted on 06/23/2013

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Advancing a child isn't necessarily the right answer. It may be fine now, and it may always be fine academically, but the social aspect of being a year or two younger than your peers is something that may have implications that you just can't recognize at this age. I'd say that in most cases...almost all cases...it's better to keep children with their same-age peers, but then really stay on top of their education and make sure they're getting individualized instruction and always being pushed. That may mean they're doing 4th or 5th grade level work at the end of the 1st grade, but they're still having social interactions and developing friendships with peers their own age. No matter how advanced your daughter is, it wouldn't be healthy for her social group at age 6 or 7 to be all 8 or 9 year olds.

Marcia - posted on 06/23/2013

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A few things:

Really, I applaud you and your family for being involved in your child's education. That is first and foremost.

I am a parent of 5 children (1 at ASU, 1 at USD with a full ride, 1 transferring to ASU in fall.)
I have been unsatisfied with public schools from what seems like the dawn of time (or was it the day the teacher sent home the spelling list with potato spelled "potatoe"... Yes.. it happened.)

I received a lot of criticism from schools, principals, community members, members of my church, neighbors and superintendents for my frustration with public schools.

There are several problems with public school. What I noticed is that the old attitudes that do not apply in today's adult world do apply in public schools. These schools are based on methodologies and pedagogical strategies from the industrial age. This may be why the principal believes an iPad is an acceleration!
It is laughable when you think about it.

Remember recently the girl who wrote an Op-Ed about not being accepted to Ivy or private colleges? Well, honestly, what I believe she did not realize is that those spots are typically reserved for children who attend private school.

I would say that at this point, encouragement and not pushing is good. You want to prepare your child to sit for the SSAT. This will determine her level for the private schools. My daughter was college level by the age of 13.

Skipping a year may not be the best thing - socially. However, who is to determine such things. These days, there are bullies. I can tell you that I know a girl who skipped 2nd grade and she couldn't make it one semester in college. Her name was Peggy and everyone had such high hopes for her that when she failed, she attempted suicide.

I'm not saying that will happen... I'm just saying prepare your child to succeed in every way: emotionally, intellectually, spiritually, financially and physically.

I also agree with the person who posted about K12. This is not "homeschooling" per se. The lessons are prepared and available online. The parent or grandparent is the "mentor".

Through this program, 2 of my children were able to start college at the age of 16 years old. I'm just saying that when public schools do not meet needs, there are some options.

Now, keep in mind, I am in Arizona where there are many D schools (including the one in my subdivision - San Tan Heights). There are programs if the school is rated a D, at least here, where you can get funds to use at any private school. You may want to see if there is something like this in California.

Also, there are many scholarships, especially for such a gifted child.
Finally, I know private schools can be costly, but really, 15k a year is only $300 a week. I mean, well... some people spend more than that eating out in a week. So, there are ways to put aside for your child's education if you want this. Remember, there are scholarships and other funding programs too.

Good luck. You have a great responsibility, it seems! So far, so good for standing up!

Kyle - posted on 06/23/2013

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You say homeschool isn't an option. Maybe you haven't done enough research to give it a chance. I homeschooled both my 2nd grader and Kindergartner last year for the first time and was allowed to teach them a year ahead of grade level (they are also advanced). It was not as hard as I thought, and I am not "special," just a frustrated mom. If you homeschool through K12 online, you aren't even the teacher. They do all their work online with a virtual teacher. I have heard this program is very open to letting kids work ahead as well. You might also try a local charter school. They are free, and some work to the GATE curriculum standards. The one my son attended in Encinitas, CA did.

Elena - posted on 06/23/2013

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Depending on where you are, budget cuts have left the brighter children behind. I would recommend private school. One that would allow her to excel, but still with her peers her age to keep that part of her growth normal. I had this issue. We moved schools. The second one has bigger budget. Good luck.

Cyndi - posted on 06/21/2013

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The only pther advise I can give is to meet with your districts counseler and have her tested for gifted and taleted and keep pushing them to mover her or give her harder work. Good luck hun

Carrie - posted on 06/21/2013

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Homeschool isn't an option, and quite frankly i'm not the home teacher type, it definately takes a special kind of person to do that. And as far as private schools go, in our area they START at $15,000 per school year, I've checked it out. Not an option either :(

Cyndi - posted on 06/21/2013

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Have you considered homeschool? I myself am starting it in the fall because my daughter is advanced and needed more of a challenge. Idk what your situation is but she would be able to move ahead at a pace more suited to her learning style

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