Are Soothers/Pacifiers Good Or Bad For My 1 Month Son?

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Firebird - posted on 03/04/2011

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Breaking a pacifier habit is a lot easier than breaking a thumb sucking habit.

Barbara - posted on 03/06/2011

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Do not get him started if you can help it! It becomes addicting. You will rarely see his face again until he is weaned off which is hard and those things are very unsanitary! Breed bacteria and is not necessary. Let the baby learn to sooth himself using his own human coping mechanisms! Good luck with your new baby!

Louise - posted on 03/04/2011

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All three of my children have had a dummy until they wanted to leave it out their mouths. My sons are now adults and have perfectly straight teeth with no fillings. My daughter is 28 months and only has a dummy at night if she wants it. All children feel soothed by a dummy as sucking is a natural instinct to all new borns. A dummy is far healthier than a child that sucks it's thumb as this habbit is hard to break.

Cynthia - posted on 03/05/2011

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I loved soothers for my kids, I kept several on hand they are great when babies teething, and for baby's who would otherwise always be 'plugged in' for nursing mums, and are way better than sucking on an empty bottle!

Take the lead from your baby if he/she doesn't want it but will take it if waiting to nurse or for a bottle then keep it to hand. don't use it if your child needs mommy/daddy time. do use it when you are trying to balance your NEEDS with your baby's NEEDS, for under ones you know they don't need it if they suck their own fingers and make a game out of how far they can't shoot the thing from their mouth(my eldest, across a fifteen foot room!) Some only give it up for something they want more:playschool(my second at 3) my third used one occasionally but was a fast nurser and didn't seem to want any additional suck time, my 4 and 5 didn't bother except for teething once they were about 6 months but then they had much older siblings and about half a dozen girls in all (I babysat two sets of siblings the same age as my younger daughters) to entertain them!

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Diane - posted on 03/14/2011

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I wouldn't give one unless there is an actual 'need' for one. Only one of my 4 kids ever used one because even when she was finished nursing she had a great need to suck and she didn't want the breast anymore because she didn't want milk but she would take the pacifier (which she wouldn't take if she wanted to nurse) It's real easy to get in the habbit though of just giving it whenever baby cries and that's usually when you get to the point of it being a difficult habbit to break. If you watch for the signs though most babies are ready to give it up around 9-10 months, they switch from needing it to just wanting it. Another thing to remember is that a pacifier is meant to mimick a mother's nipple so if he'll take the breast (even if seems like all the time) it's better to offer the breast because sometimes (most times) the desire to suck is the desire to be close to mommy for comfort. Good luck!

Grace - posted on 03/14/2011

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I am a mother-baby nurse.
Pacifiers should not be introduced until breastfeeding is well established, with a good milk supply. Perhaps 3-4 weeks. After that, pacifiers may be used for sleep times, as a way to decrease SIDS. Breastfeeding moms should remember that milk is made through supply and demand. Removal of milk from the breast is what stimulates more milk. Make sure to feed regularly to maintain good supply. A pacifier can be a lifesaver at times :)

Tammy - posted on 03/14/2011

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We call them Binkies! :) A Pacifier is highly recommended for babies under a year, because it helps reduce the risk of SIDS. Constant sucking helps keep babies from falling into too deep a sleep, that they can't wake up from. Though, you should start weaning your baby off it right away once he's a year, because it could cause the teeth to move forward (causing buck teeth). But, easier said than done. My daughter is almost 3 and has her binky at night, for car rides and during stressful situations (ah, the terrible twos!). I had to switch her from silicone to latex, cause she would get stressed and chew right through them. Also, her two front teeth have moved forward; she looks really cute that way, but I worry about future orthodontic bills.

Rebecca - posted on 03/14/2011

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My son is 5 and had a pacifier until he was 3. I let him wean himself. My daughter is 5 weeks old today and has had one since the day she was born - we thought she was having trouble with her sucking reflex, so she got one. I don't see a problem with them.

Trish - posted on 03/14/2011

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Pacifiers certainly work to sooth unsettled babies. They're convenient and quick. Thats the up side. One of my daughters had one and there were times I was glad we used it. However there are some down sides to them. Sometimes they fall out of the babies mouth while theyre sleeping and it can wake them. They cry and you have to get up and put it back in. They have a tendancy to drop out onto the floor or ground, which is probhably ok at home, but not so good up town or other public places. I used to carry a spare clean one. When your little one is older they wont settle without their pacifier and they have a tendancy to loose them so you are always buying new ones and theyre not cheap. Then you have to eventually wean them from it and theres abit of a saga there. They love their dummy and they dont want to be parted from it. My first daughter was 3months premiture and quite unsettled so the pacifier was a god send to me and I got some sleep but I didnt need to use one for my second daugher and in some ways it was easier. I dont think they do any harm and it didnt damage my daughters teeth which is a myth I was told. The other thing about them is that some people dont like seeing babies and children with them and they dont alway keep their opinions to themselves so you can find yourself defending your choice to use one. Hope this helps.

Patricia - posted on 03/14/2011

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"soothing" is always good! i never had any trouble. i only needed them when i was driving or we were in church, and/or if they were upset. i usually breast fed my two babies if they were upset so that i could rule out anything bigger than just fussy or a little uncomfortable. the problem i see is when the children have them in their mouth it seems like 24/7. that's not good for them, i'm sure. like 24/7 they "need" to have something to soothe them? how are they going to learn to deal with frustration? and they will learn that the pain from boo-boos doesn't last forever. i learned that's why kids flip out when they have a boo-boo of some kind. they don't realize the pain is going to go away and not keep getting worse. hope that helps!

Beth - posted on 03/14/2011

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I'm a dental hygienist and I feel that they are ok just try to get one that isn't real large. If you take it away by the time they are two they shouldn't have any trouble with their teeth and the shape of their mouth. It is usually better than the thumb because you can opt to throw it out.

Laura - posted on 03/14/2011

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I think using pacifiers is a good thing because it helps them to learn to soothe themselves. My daughter would only take one when she wanted it, not when we wanted her to have it. And like Joanna said below, its a lot easier to break a pacifier habit than it is a thumb sucking habit. Hope this helps

Donna - posted on 03/14/2011

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I don't see anything wrong with a pacifier for a one month old. However, I must caution you, don't use it all the time for your son. If you are breastfeeding having a pacifier can cause nipple confusion, especially if the nipple on the pacifier is not a NUK. Which is shaped more like a mother's nipple. And, a baby must learn to soothe themselves, as well.

A lot of the need for pacifiers comes from not being held enough as an infant, not given enough cuddle time by either mom or dad, or both, in my humble opinion. Leaving an infant in the crib, swing or any other mode of not holding him/her, can leave an infant growing up to think they are not loved and/or cared for. You will not spoil your son by holding him. However, don't pick him up the minute he starts crying. Give him some time to comfort himself and settle down. Then go pick him up, unless he is absolutely inconsolable, then you must go to him and tend to his needs, most definitely.

The decision is ultimately yours, read the answers others have posted, do research yourself and weigh your options.

Good luck!

Candas - posted on 03/14/2011

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Good afternoon, I think that pacifiers are not good. Moms dont yell at me haha. The reason I feel this way is because babies can sooth themselves if giving a change. I have 2 daughters one 14. Who bye the way had colic and we did try everthy pacifier out. He wont care wich one he gets. You go with what you feel that you need for him and he will let you know which one he likes.

Susan - posted on 03/14/2011

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Hi Ambika
I think it's a very personal thing. My babies never had dummies and personally I hate them, especially when babies become toddlers and they still have them but I was happy to use my breasts as pacifiers.
You could always use one for those first six months when the baby is learning to settle and self sooth and then gradually wean it before it becomes all knowing!
Dentists prefer dummies to thumbs as it is a lot easier to remove them when the child gets older.
Follow your own instincts.
Sue x

Roxanne - posted on 03/14/2011

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I think Pacifiers are good ONLY for the first 3 months of life, then no more. The babies need that sucking action for only that long, after that then it is a pacifier for the parents not the infant. Along with our children and over 200 Foster babies (20 years) each time the doctor told us only 3 months no longer.

Tracey - posted on 03/14/2011

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They're not bad. My daughter had one to sooth herself to sleep. I chose to take it away once she was over the colics and when she started to "need" it in the middle of the day simply for the sake of having it,not for sleep. She was four months old by then. It took a full week of difficult bedtimes and it was over. They are good if they are used only for soothing in the early stages if you ask me!

Joy - posted on 03/14/2011

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I had to struggle with this when my daughter was born. I read many published studies and learned quite a bit. While I had my opinions, I wanted to know medical facts and actual over-time evidence.



Basically, what I learned was similar to the results of the Community Paediatrics Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) (read their full publication here: http://www.cps.ca/english/statements/CP/...). Using a pacifier had proven to increase otitis media (Ear infection, bacterial or viral infection, usually requiring tubes and antibiotics as treatment, along with pain relievers to comfort), even though, the pacifiers themselves were negative for the major pathogens that cause otitis media on 52.5% of the tested pacifiers contained microorganisms (most common was alpha-hemolytic streptococci). Pacifier sucking may impair the functioning of the eustachian tube by changing its patency, and the pressure balance between the nasopharynx and the middle ear. In one study, pacifier sucking was found in 40% of 601 children with chronic otitis media who required tympanostomy tubes in Toronto, Ontario.



Additionally suggested that pacifier use be restricted to the first 10 months of life when the need to suck is strongest and the risk of acute otitis media is low. The results suggested that restricting pacifier use to the moments of falling asleep would reduce the occurrence of acute otitis media.



In addition, four research teams have published studies which support pacifiers appear to reduce Sudden Infant Death Syndrome; there are many theories on how pacifiers might be protective in the sleep environment. One recent study suggests that pacifiers lower the auditory arousal threshold. They may provide a mechanical barrier to rolling over into the prone position. Sucking on a pacifier keeps the tongue forward maintaining upper airway patency. An infant who is soothed by a pacifier may not move as often during sleep, thus limiting the chance of becoming covered by blankets. Others postulate that pacifiers might reduce gastroesophageal reflux and subsequent apnea. It has also been suggested that pacifier use could lead to slight carbon dioxide retention and increase the respiratory drive.



In regards to realignment to bite or teeth, there was no evidence that pacifiers would alter, if used 5 hrs or less a day and under the age of 5 years old and considerable less amongst thumb-suckers.



(I wish I could find the results for the below.)

Finally another study I read about 15 years ago, tracked children over the course of 20 years, who used pacifiers/thumb-suckers often throughout the day, against those who did not use a pacifier/thumb-sucking at all. It was found that many individuals who continued thumb-sucking/pacifier use, typically were less outgoing and more likely to be less social in a group or choose not to lead, and typically were not satisfied in their jobs/careers. Also discovered of those who did not depend on pacifiers/thumb-sucking where found to be more outgoing, successful in their careers and more apt to take on and succeed in challenges.



Now based on my experience with my child:

I only used a pacifier as a last resort at times of sleep. Occasionally if my daughter was fussy during the day, I would place the pacifier in her mouth to sooth her, no longer than a minute while I coddled her, then removed the pacifier while still coddling. These prove to work for me. I did use at night to get my daughter to sleep, but once she was in a deep sleep, I would removed the pacifier from her crib (mouth if need be). She slept through the night at one month old. Also if she would get fussy in the middle of the night, I would wait no more than 5 minutes before I would come into her room (the longest 5 minutes ever), depending on cry level intensity). She slept through the night at 1 month old. Today she is a VERY outgoing individual who will always step-up to a challenges, has done well in both school and sports, and lead in school committees without any push from me at all. She became student body president, before I even know she was in the running.



She has informed me that she will be attending college to become a Psychologist.

Giselle - posted on 03/14/2011

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Sucking is a natural way for babies to self-sooth, which is a good skill to learn. When their teeth start to come in, it can affect them negatively if the pacifier spends too much time in the child's mouth. Every baby is different - I've had three and they all had a different relationship with the pacifier. My earliest weaner was the biggest pacifier fan and my latest weaner was the least of the pacifier users.

Mrs. - posted on 03/14/2011

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My mother in law is a dental assistant, she told us her boss disagrees with it ever affecting how the mouth grows. She said that is out dated info.

Not sure if this is the case. Just seems different dentist think differently about that.

Leandra - posted on 03/14/2011

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My Dentist said you should do away with pacifiers at 15 months. At this point it can start to effect how the palette grows. Before then it is fine

Ginny - posted on 03/14/2011

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Your 1 month old needs a way to self regulate and sucking is an important skill for many reasons. mostly, for future self-regulation. That means having self control over his emotions. He needs to self regulate because the world is very stimulating to him right now and can be very stressful. Also her needs to suck to develop the mouth muscles to help him speak later on. So if you want him to be able to talk and self regulate his emotions later on, i suggest you let him lead the way for what he NEEDS. Worry when he if he still wants it when he is eighteen!

Kristin - posted on 03/14/2011

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My son would never take one. From what I have heard from friends who used them, the hardest part is getting them to give it up.

Mazee - posted on 03/14/2011

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i would have to agree with all the ladies.pacifiers are good for baby. my son is 2.5 years and he now uses his only at nap time. he has had it since he was a month old and he has a perfect set of teeth to date. you can also research as a mom, there are different shapes and sizes by different manufacturers. so its up to you and not anybody else. i have found the best to be AVENT or NUK pacifiers.

Pamela - posted on 03/13/2011

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It really depends on the higenic side of it,as your baby can easily get infection of the throat if you let the dummy lay around without a cover over it.for me dummy babies are very calm babies.

Brenda - posted on 03/13/2011

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If they want it I see no harm in giving it to them. I have 4 older children and only one of them took to the pacifier. If it is the teeth you are worried about DON'T WORRY the one who sucked the pacifier is the one who doesn't need braces.

Jessica - posted on 03/13/2011

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Much better than thumb-sucking! I was dead set against my first child having one, but she needed to suck. It got lost one day and she never missed it. None of my other children had theirs for very long either. Just be diligent about the quality of the one you buy - some are better (safer) than others.

Barbara - posted on 03/13/2011

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Some children won't take a pacifier. My grandchildren didn't and my children, when they were babies rarely used one, though I had them on-hand. I have not read any literature (solid, scientifically supported research) that has indicated that the use of a pacifier is harmful. The old wives tale tat it will lead to thumb-sucking is a myth. Point-in-fact, my cousins never had a pacifier and were weaned to a glass by 12 months and three of them sucked their thumbs.

If it is a comfort to your baby, there is no reason not to use one at one month.

Nicole - posted on 03/13/2011

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Both my children have had pacifiers since birth. I found it helped settle them & they fell asleep better. My son is 3 months old & has had one since the night he was born.

Stephanie - posted on 03/13/2011

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My daughter is 7 months old and she doesn't use them anymore she took herself off them she has been off them since a month old. But suggest them because it keeps them quiet.

Victoria - posted on 03/13/2011

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It all depends on how you feel about it. They can be comforting to a baby, but if it is not necessary I wouldn't use them. If the child needs it to feel soothed, then uses it or they may end up sucking their thumb, which is a harder habit to break.

Rainer - posted on 03/13/2011

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Both my babies have had soothers i packed them in my bag ready for the hospital before my kids were born because i went to school with people who were still sucking their thumbs and i have friends who suck their thumbs now at age 30+, its not pretty, so if you want your children to have them then go ahead at least you can ween them off them unlike thumbs. By the way my children are age 19 years and 3 years old and there have been no problems due to them having soothers, good luck.x

[deleted account]

I regret not having them right away for my first child. I was told they were bad. But because he didn't have a pacifier, he was latched on a lot more than he needed to because suckling was a comfort to him. I was only able to take it for 3 days. Then I was so soar, I had to put him on formula and eventually gave him a pacifier too.
If I had a pacifier in the first place, I would have been able to breast feed longer.
Some babies find pacifiers comforting, some don't. It won't hurt to see if your baby is comforted by them. And if he is, there's nothing wrong with providing him that comfort.

Cynthia - posted on 03/13/2011

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I don't think it would be bad for him as long as you don't keep it in his mouth all the time. It should be kept for nap or bedtime ( and the shopping trip when you want him to stay conforted while you are busy). It's alot easier to break the pacifier habit than the thumb or finger habit.

Tiffany - posted on 03/13/2011

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I think at one month it is perfectly fine. My twins are almost 2 and still use them when they get fussy and to soothe them asleep. I never used one as a baby, and I ended up needing braces etc. I don't think it causes any harm for the baby, but helps soothe them and when THEY are ready to let go, they will let you know. Not using them or taking them away too early because others tell you to or you think you should is not good. You are doing it for yourself and not the child.

Kathleen - posted on 03/13/2011

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my daughter has had on since she was born, she just turned a year i dont have any issues with her having it as it is a SIDS risk reducer and i have a 7 wk old nephew who passed away from sids.....i guess its up to the parent

User - posted on 03/12/2011

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To the mom who said her 2 year old will scream I feel for you but very honestly if you give into the tantrum then you are teaching her to use this behavior to get her way. As a mom of 9 and grandmom of 6 I am telling you the thing to do is take it away and when she screams then put her in her room and tell her that you will talk with her about why when she is calm. Explain to her that she is hurting her pretty teeth and that she is a very big girl and not a baby any more. Tell her you are doing what is best for her and that she needs to trust you. Then go spoil her a little by buying her some toy that she absolutely adores that you have never been willing to buy her before and tell her that it is because she is such a big girl now. It worked on all of mine as well as on the three grandkids that used pacifiers. The " you are not a baby" thing goes over real well on pacifiers and potty training. It works even better if you accomplish the potty training first then you can equate the pacifier with the diapers and the kids get the idea that pacifiers and diapers are for babies and they are not babies any more.

User - posted on 03/12/2011

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To the mom who said her 2 year old will scream I feel for you but very honestly if you give into the tantrum then you are teaching her to use this behavior to get her way. As a mom of 9 and grandmom of 6 I am telling you the thing to do is take it away and when she screams then put her in her room and tell her that you will talk with her about why when she is calm. Explain to her that she is hurting her pretty teeth and that she is a very big girl and not a baby any more. Tell her you are doing what is best for her and that she needs to trust you. Then go spoil her a little by buying her some toy that she absolutely adores that you have never been willing to buy her before and tell her that it is because she is such a big girl now. It worked on all of mine as well as on the three grandkids that used pacifiers. The " you are not a baby" thing goes over real well on pacifiers and potty training. It works even better if you accomplish the potty training first then you can equate the pacifier with the diapers and the kids get the idea that pacifiers and diapers are for babies and they are not babies any more.

User - posted on 03/12/2011

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For a one month old they are fine. Dentists hate them becasue they add to dental alignment problems for children after they have teeth but before their teeth come in there is not a real issue. The idea is to take away all sucking things once they have their teeth because the sucking action causes alignment problems and the bottles can cause "bottle mouth" tooth decay. SO use it now but the minute those teeth come in then start weening the child off of all nipples bottle or pacifier. Chew toys and colling soothers during teething are a totally different thing and they are usually ok as long as they do not contain harmful liquids and are in good condition. Buy only well known name brands and at the first sign of damage to one throw it away.

User - posted on 03/12/2011

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For a one month old they are fine. Dentists hate them becasue they add to dental alignment problems for children after they have teeth but before their teeth come in there is not a real issue. The idea is to take away all sucking things once they have their teeth because the sucking action causes alignment problems and the bottles can cause "bottle mouth" tooth decay. SO use it now but the minute those teeth come in then start weening the child off of all nipples bottle or pacifier. Chew toys and colling soothers during teething are a totally different thing and they are usually ok as long as they do not contain harmful liquids and are in good condition. Buy only well known name brands and at the first sign of damage to one throw it away.

User - posted on 03/12/2011

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I think it is a great tool to comfort babies, but I think that by 2 years the child should be weaned off of it. We stopped giving her the pacifier by the time she was 15 months old and by 17 months she didn't want it anymore.

Rebecca - posted on 03/12/2011

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I didnt take my daughters pacifier away until she was about a year and a half. I dont think there is anything wrong with them

Cindy - posted on 03/12/2011

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To Kristen, The soother may have added to your son's speech delay, but it certainly cannot cause one. My daughter also had speech delays, but never took a pacifier. I wish she had! However, we did take her off bottles and sippy cups and used straw cups instead, which help develop the muscles near the front of the mouth (bottles and sippy cups dump the fluid in back of mouth with little effort from front muscles).

Ellie - posted on 03/12/2011

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You are the mother! The decision is yours alone. If I had had the good sense to ignore the advice given to me when my second child was born, both she and I would have been happier. I am pro soother. The operative word is sooth! A pacifier sooths both mom and baby, what could possibly be wrong with that?

Robin - posted on 03/11/2011

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Hello Ambika, I was lucky enough to have a sister in law with four children my son's senior. I learned the pacifer turned out to be helpful and my fear my son was going to be a pacifier toting toddler did not come to fruition. He is perfectly normal and thanks to the relaxation of the digestion system he was able to release some much needed gas. If you have studied any zoology, biology or nutrition, it is learned, the digestion system is formed as one of the first organs. Stimulation of the oral system can assist in digestion. Good luck and hope you are remembering to rest when you baby rests, eat and drink well.

Kristen - posted on 03/11/2011

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soothers were a main factor in my sons speech delay, how ever after 2 weeks of colic with my second we bought a soother anyway.

Pam - posted on 03/11/2011

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I had two kids, one didn't care or need a pacifier, the other my daughter had such a strong need for one, and I let her. My philosophy wrong or right was if they have a pacifier now, maybe no cigarette later lol. My daughter continued to suck her thumb, and I know that to this day, my blackbelt butt kicking daughter sneaks an occasional thumb and blanket to calm herself but she has straight teeth, no cavities, and she hates the idea of cigarettes. She is so "grounded" and I attribute it to a great mom and dad (ha ha) and being allowed to calm herself her way. We are a family of comfort items: son has a blanket.

Cindy - posted on 03/11/2011

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Funny, I sucked my thumb as a kid for MANY years when I slept... somehow I never needed braces and have very straight teeth. Lucky I guess.

Dixie - posted on 03/11/2011

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Cassondra

She screams because you give in to her. When you stop giving in, she will stop screaming. You are in for trouble if you let her rule you. She is 2 now, wait until she is 15.

Fran - posted on 03/11/2011

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a pacifier is meant to pacify, to calm a baby down when they just need to suck. i think it's ok to give them one as long as you aren't forcing them to take one. my older son had no interest in one and my younger son used his on and off through the day and at night. and it was easier to break the paifier habit than i thought. the only thing that bothered me was when people would force a baby to take a pacifier when they really just needed to be help or were still hungry. in other words, listen to your baby's cries and decide if a pacy is needed or if something else is needed.

[deleted account]

Both of my children had a pacifier. They did fine. It helped to soothe them. It is better than putting to bed with a milk bottle which rots their teeth. I did not have one but sucked my thumb and I had to wear braces for 4 years.

Debbie - posted on 03/11/2011

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An infant's natural soothing instinct is to suck....imo, pacifiers are ok thru this phase. Dr.s claim this is the natural instinct until between @ 2 - 3 years old.

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