Baptizing children

ANGEL - posted on 04/25/2013 ( 393 moms have responded )

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I was told by a pastor that a child should be old enough to know they have sinned before they get baptized, I tend to disagree. What do you think?

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Kylie - posted on 05/01/2013

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The Pastor is neither "Right" or "Wrong". The issue of Baptism is one which has a variety of different interpretations and teachings in the various Christian denominations. Very simply, the churches tend to subscribe to "Believers Baptism" or baptism of all ages, including Infant baptism. And within those who baptise infants, there are differing beliefs - whether the baptism is merely symbolic, or whether it instils Grace or Forgiveness. In Biblical times whole families were baptised including children - an age was not specified. This, together with the "Let the little children come to me..." passage feeds into those churches who promote Baptism for all, including infants. Churches who require a "Decide for Christ" first tend to, in some cases, dedicate babies but only Baptise older children or adults who appear to show belief first - taking the text "He who believes and is baptised will be saved" chronologically - belief first. Churches who bapsise infants (such as Lutheran and Anglican churches) tend to have a “Confirmation” ceremony for teenagers/adults, where, after some period of instruction, the person “Confirms” the promises made on their behalf by their Parents and Godparents when they were babies. So its really a wider question of where your personal beliefs lie and which church’s teaching you are comfortable with. A google search of Baptism or Baptism comparison should make for interesting reading. Hope you can find a suitable “church home”. Greetings from Sunny Queensland, Australia

Ellena - posted on 04/28/2013

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If you are a born again Christian and not under a man made religion then the ultimate authority should be the bible. Everyone who professes to be Christian should ONLY be listening to what the bible teaches. There are no instances whatsoever of people baptising their infants in the bible. It's just not biblical. Jesus was baptised before he began his ministry as an example and only then was it a baptism of repentance (John the baptist one). Not that Jesus needed to repent but was leading by example. Each individual needs to stand before God with a good conscience and accept Jesus as lord and saviour and then follow that up with baptism as a symbol of their commitment. Infants can't do that. You teach your children in the ways of God and explain what salvation and repentance and baptism is but they have to make that decision for themselves before God. Salvation is a conscious act. Repenting of ones sin, accepting what Jesus did for them on the cross, believing that God raised him from the dead and then turning away from that sinful life and embracing a true biblical life. We can all have all the opinions of the world but ultimately it's what the bible says is correct, that is if you are of the Christian FAITH and not of a religion.

Ellena - posted on 04/28/2013

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Just because it is a nice thing to do for your baby does not make it biblical. A lot of believers have what they call dedications (not baptisms) as a way of dedicating that child to God and his protection and hoping that God will guide them and help them teach the child in the things of God. This is biblical. Infant baptism are not they are traditions made up by men and not based on anything written in the bible. Remember the bible, Gods word, is the final authority in these matters.

Ruth - posted on 04/28/2013

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Your statement was If your child is sick would you wait till the child is old enough to tell you that they are sick before you take them to the doctor. Why would you deny a child baptism just because they are not old enough to speak for themselves. Remember what Jesus said to his disciples when they tried to send children away from Jesus " let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these." Mat. 19: 14
That pastor is DEAD wrong baptize that child ASAP...

My response

The difference between you illustration is that God does not send a child to hell because they are not baptized. You cannot find that in the Bible anywhere. Not baptizing a child is not akin to the story of sending the children away from Jesus in any shape or form. A child according to Scripture is to be brought up in the ways of the Lord. Parents are to teach them about God and what Salvation means. You cannot change what the Bible says about baptism to fit your ideals. Baptism is not salvation...rather it is an outward sign that a person has willingly accepted Christ as Savior.

Donna - posted on 04/28/2013

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I agree with your pastor as if you read the bible correctly and any verse that has to do with baptism is all about the person believing in Jesus that he died personally for them, then they were baptised, babies aren't able to understand. I am grateful that I wasn't baptised or anything as a child and was able to make that choice myself and was when i was 22, 3 months after being saved. It meant so much to me. My older son was baptised just a month ago, he's 14 and became a Christian over a year ago and took that step himself, which will please God much more than if I had made that decision for him. Being baptised can't save you, only the Grace of God.

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~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/01/2013

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***MoD Update***

Thank you everyone for your responses. I am closing this thread due to shear volume. I think Angel received many thoughtful responses, and got her answers.

~~WtCoM MoD LiTtLe MiSs~~

Lee - posted on 05/01/2013

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I 100% AGREE with your pastor. Children should be old enough to know that they are sinners, and make a decision to receive Jesus Christ as their Lord and Saviour. Only then they can make a decision to be baptised. Jesus Christ was not an infant when He was baptised. Or can anybody PLEASE, PLEASE show me anywhere in the bible where a baby was baptised on a head because there is nowhere in the bible where a baby is baptised on a head. Come on guys let's be frank, there are a lot of self- composed doctrines that are preached as the word of God. Let's read the bible too guys...

Carla - posted on 05/01/2013

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In Judaism, 13 is the age of reason, which they celebrate with bar mitzvah for boys and bat mitzva for girls. The boys recite 'today I am a man' (never heard a bat mitzva, but I ASSUME they say 'today I am a woman') Children are clean until this age. It wouldn't be logical to baptize a child before they can fully understand right from wrong, because baptizing is for the forgiving (or remission) of sin.

We dedicated our children, just as Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the temple on the 8th day. Dedication is more for the parents than for the child. At the ceremony you vow before God, just like at a marriage ceremony, that you will raise your child in the Lord. Sometimes the congregation is also asked to vow to watch over the child as well.

God bless, all!

Joy - posted on 05/01/2013

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In the Bible Jesus was taken to the temple at 8 years old to be blessed by Joseph and Mary. The dedication service which many protestant churches do is for the parents to be thankful to God for the blessing of a child in their marriage.

Janet - posted on 05/01/2013

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Too many people forget today that we have a merciful Father who wants us to be his children before we can even reason about it. He takes us as his children, we do not need to decide about that. This is why we baptise our children as babies - being grateful for such grace. It is part of the covenant of God with his people. It replaced the circumcision of the Old Testament.

SENDEGE - posted on 05/01/2013

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We have to groom our children in a path we know its right, if the bible you believe in say that Jesus is the way,the truth, and life, thats what you have to teach you child the same thing, other wise letting children to decide whatever they want in future with out parents guidance, this world would be unruly.

SENDEGE - posted on 05/01/2013

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baptism comes after accepting that Jesus is your Lord and Savour, confession and then baptism but a young child cant confess that neither understand it, so for kids we only pray for them.

that tradition came form the catholic church its just a roman tradition being a reason why its not in d bible.

Billie - posted on 05/01/2013

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I agree with Sue. It's a personal choice that when it is made, the person needs to be able to understand. Jesus was, what, 30 before he got baptized? We are to follow his lead.

Sue - posted on 05/01/2013

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The general practice of most Protestant Christian churches is to dedicate your child when they are infants and then to be baptised when you accept Jesus Christ as your saviour is the right time make that commitment to baptism. this is a personal choice and an outward sign that you have truly accepted Christ into your life. There is no mention of infant baptism any where in the bible and this is where the Protestant churches get their instructions from although the Anglican, Church of England and a few of the churches which still follow tradition still believe in infant baptism. Many people I know that have been baptised as infants have been re baptised as adults and a lot have just been confirmed as teenagers when they are old enough to make that commitment, this is also an outward gesture to show others that you have accepted Christ into your life.

Vicky - posted on 05/01/2013

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From a purely logical perspective, exposing a person's (including a child's) head, or indeed, whole body, to H2O changes nothing.

And we could play quote-from-authority for years and still not come up with a definitive answer.

Best I can offer is that, assuming you are a person of faith, you pray about it.

What I can tell you, though, is you couldn't pick out the "properly baptised" (by whatever definition of "proper" you like) from everyone else, so there's no earthly way to tell who got it right and who stuffed it up. What I would like to think, though, is that a compassionate and forgiving God would, if the "right" Baptism is so very important, forgive those who, through sincere error, get it wrong.

NINA - posted on 05/01/2013

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Hi Angel I agree with your pastor, because children are pure and innocent and still don't know the differences between right and wrong but as they grow older they will be able to reason and then will they decide whether they are ready for baptism or not. but then again our faith differs this is just my opinion may their are other good reason why you should baptize your baby now.

Nicole - posted on 05/01/2013

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You can have your child baptized if you want, but it won't make a difference....When your child comes to the understanding of Christ and accepts Him as Lord and savior, that is when being baptized will actually mean something..........although water baptism does not get you into heaven either it is just a symbolic act. Remember the thief on the cross, he never came down from the cross to get baptized, he just accepted that Jesus was Lord, and Jesus told Him "today, you will be with me in paradise" So water baptism is not mandatory to get into heaven, Baptism by the Holy Spirit is what counts, it is when you Repent and accept Jesus into your live, the Holy Spirit comes and lives in you....(Matthew 3:11 -John the Baptise said, I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost) and in it says (Titus 3:5 - Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;)
.......So when you get baptized, it is symbolic of death and ressurection, going down in the water represents dying and being washed clean of your old sinful self, and rising up from the water represents being bornagain, born of a new spirit, a new life in Christ Jesus......So you must understand that the act of baptism, is way more than just having your child blessed....It is an act that a person of understanding does to show publicly to others that they have accepted Christ and that they are now choosing to get rid of their old ways and now live a life in Christ.........So I would say just have your child blessed or dedicate them back to Christ......And even doing so is just the first step, you should also make sure that your walk is pleasing to Christ, show your children the best example of a true follower of Christ (don't compromise Jesus for nothing or anyone) and don't say oh when they will get of age they can make their own desicion....You will have to stand before God one day and explain, why you never made sure that your child knew Him on a daily and personal level....Live your life knowing, my Children knows exactly how great and Awesome He is....Do not let the influences of this world make their decisions.....And I promise every situation they need an answer too is found in the word of God.....& well if you choose to seek answers from someone or somewhere else; you'll have to deal with the results of that..........hmmm, if I follow what God says about it, what will become of it??? And if I choose my own way, then what could possibly become of it??? It will truly come down to teaching your child, the depth of Jesus.....Not what people think He is, but who He says He is, and teaching them to never compromise their walk with Him.........I hope this help....May the Lord Bless you and Yours<>

Amanda - posted on 04/30/2013

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I'm Mormon and children have to be 8 to be baptized. 8 is the age of accountability and the soonest that one can be baptized. Baptism is entering into a covenant with Heavenly Father and I believe that to make those promises one needs to understand what they are. It's more than washing away sins.

Anon - posted on 04/30/2013

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jesus said,"let the children come unto me and do not hinder them." The sooner they receive the sacrament, the sooner they benefit from Christ's grace. Baptism doesn't remove personal sin anyway, it removes original sin, opens the doors of heaven for us and gives us sanctifying grace, which makes us holy and pleasing to God. Grace makes it easier for your child to live a holy life. Later, when your child is old enough to understand his/ her personal sin, it will be time for him or her to receive the sacrament of reconciliation, when his/ her personal sins shall be washed away by the blood of the Lamb and the child's relationship to God, which was damaged by sin, will be restored and your child will be reconciled to God.

Candice - posted on 04/30/2013

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How about DON'T baptize at all?!

Why forcibly indoctrinate your child or children into a religion or belief they may not necessarily want or continue to follow in future as adults?!

Let Them grow into adults whom can choose if they wish to be baptized OR not.

That would both cover the fact they will (or at least understand) why they are being baptized.

Kathleen - posted on 04/30/2013

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Our church 'dedicates' babies, then when the children are old enough to accept Jesus as their PERSONAL saviour, that's when they decide if they want to get baptised. I don't think there's a lot of emphasis on whether they understand that they have SINNED so much as them having an understanding on who Jesus IS and that he wants to be their best friend. Of course it is explained to them that we have sinned, but its more about getting children to fall in love with Jesus and WANT to follow Him, rather than SCARING them into following him because they have sinned and need Him to save them.

In my opinion, it should be the child's personal choice and based on whether THEY are ready to take that step, in their personal relationship with Jesus. X

Amy - posted on 04/30/2013

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Well, it depends on why you are baptizing your child? I see nothing wrong with baptizing a baby, as long as you are aware that babies can't repent and baptism doesn't save. Thank God that the God we serve is a kind and gracious Lord! Babies and children are not held accountable for their sins! God covers them by the faith of their believing family!

It is not until the "age of accountability" that children can truly repent and choose to follow Christ. If they decide to re-dedicate, baptize, commit, or whatever term you choose, Praise God! However, their walk will determine in whom they follow. If they confess with their mouth that Jesus is Lord, and believe that God raised Christ from the dead, then they are saved! Baptism is not necessary. It is an outward expression of what has already occurred in their heart. Lets remember that the thief on the cross next to Jesus was not baptized. "Lord, remember me when you enter your Kingdom." And Jesus said, " Today, you shall be with me in paradise". He didn't say, "wait, you need to be baptized".

If you pray and seek the Lord, whatever decision the Holy Spirit leads you to make about baptism will be right! Train up a child in the way they should go, and when they are old, they will not depart from it.

Fleur - posted on 04/30/2013

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My family were all baptized at birth, so I am very happy with that, I have had discussions with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints as they do not baptize until around 8yrs old. Each to their own
God Bless

Adriane - posted on 04/30/2013

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I think it makes more sense to say that a child has to know they have sinned before they can repent. Repentance requires acknowledgement of sin. If we are old enough, we repent before we are baptized, but, undoubtedly, we will repent many more times after as we struggle to become more Christ-like. Babies, on the other hand, cannot repent, but neither are they guilty of wrong-doing, so it is not necessary for them to repent before being baptized. If they continue living as Christians, they will learn to repent when they have done wrong just like older children do.

Christians acknowledge "one baptism for the remission of sins." It was written into the Creed in the 4th century, and most Christians still believe this. There is nothing in the Bible that gives a specific age when baptism is permitted. We do know that infant baptism was practiced in early Christianity because it is discussed in early Christian writings as far back as the 200s, that we know of. Opposition to infant baptism came from Tertullian, who was influenced by the Montanists and left Christianity. He believed that baptism should be delayed until near death because God may not forgive sin after baptism. Since he believed in having only one baptism for the remission of sins but didn't believe sin after baptism would be forgiven, that posed a problem. Obviously, one can see why he would not approve of infant baptism. This was in the 2nd and 3rd centuries, early Christianity. Just like circumcision had been a kind of initiation rite into a community of faith, so was baptism. Children born to Christian parents had their children baptized. It was also recognized as a time when God imparted grace and a kind of rebirth took place, not because babies were born evil or guilty, but because we are all born into a world affected by sin and all suffer the affects of sin. It was normal practice to baptize babies until after the Reformation. There is historical evidence to support this. But baptism wasn't restricted to infants. So there you have it, a bit of Christian church history that most people are not aware of.

Rachel - posted on 04/30/2013

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I would actually agree with the pastor. The whole reason for baptism is to represent our decision to follow Christ and turn our back on sin and the world. You can read about it in the gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke or John). I think it's probably the pastor's heart that it's not just something you do but something that really has meaning behind it. I was baptised at 8, but I realized that I knew Jesus as my savior and wanted to make a public declaration of following him, which is what baptism is all about. Hope that's helpful, :) if not no worries.

Jacqui - posted on 04/30/2013

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Thats exactly how I was raised.... let me decide what I want to do when I was older. Only problem was that I wasn't given ALL the information so it took me many (painful) years before I actually found God. It sounds like a nice thought, but in order for it to be valid, all choices need to be laid out for the choice to be a choice.

Jacqui - posted on 04/30/2013

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Your pastor is correct Angel. You can have your baby baptised if you like, but until the child can make a congnitive choice of their own it really won't mean a lot. Just follow Jesus example. He actually wasn't baptised until he was about to start His ministry. But a lot of kids are baptised around 12yrs old. One of my sons was baptised at 11yrs ... that was his choice. And my other 14yr old is just deciding to. Basically its up to the ACTUAL individual if they want to be baptised... so to make that decision you need to understand what you're doing and why.

Dixie - posted on 04/30/2013

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Baptizing is a picture of death burial and resurection and folling after Christ as a new creature.
If you or your child have not accepted Jesus Christ as your personal savior as Romans 10 vs. 9 & 10 say If thought shall confess with thy mouth the LORD Jesos and believe on thy heart thou shalt be saves. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness and the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
1st you have to believe you are a sinner.
2nd.Christ died for your sins
3rd.Confess your sins to GOD and ask him to forgive you of your sins.He will save you from eternal hell.
4th to be baptised.
this if for all everyone man woman children who understand what sin if.

Before salvation baptizing is nothing more than getting in a tub and getting wet.
If you would like more answers please feel free to ask.

Stacey - posted on 04/30/2013

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It amazes me how bent out of shape people get over literal terms and beat down others. If we only open a book and read and do not reach out to others in our faith then there is no church as the church is not a building but the people.

Here is an example of terminology between different people are different but are the same thing:

My aunt lives up north and has for as long as I've been alive. She asks for pop and I ask for soda. They are the same thing however the terminology is different.

This rings true with different churches etc.

Dedication=christening=baptism just depends on what church you are in

Baptism=confirmation=whatever another church or belief etc may call it.

If you want to say there is no mention of baptizing a child that is not entirely true as someone else pointed out there is something about baptizing the family to God (not exact wordage but close) the family includes babies or whatever other age people in the family are.

In the CHRISTIAN (i have all caps to reiterate we're all praying to the same God and all believe Jesus is our savior) church I grew up in being a baptized Christian simply meant someone who had been baptized into the faith at birth or whenever or as we called people who are baptized at older ages confirmed Christians. (See terminology diff but same definition)

We also took holy communion every Sunday and used actual wine. (You want literal....Jesus drank wine....ijs)

So while everyone is fighting and having a pissing contest on who the better Christian is, stop having such tunnel vision that you make mountains out of mole hills. Also, don't throw stones in glass houses. Not one Christian is perfect or makes all the
right decisions or even have all the right answers. There are more important issues to get your panties in a bunch about than what simply could be a difference in terminology, and even if it isn't, does someone else baptizing their kid (even if its the same as the baptism of an adult) really affect your life? Sheesh.

Sorry that's my vent and its not directed to everyone on this thread cause not all of you are having a pissing contest ;P

Patricia - posted on 04/30/2013

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Wow people read your Bible and stop looking to others to guide you. I went back to biblegateway.com and put in different words and versions looking for a child being baptized because someone said it was in there. Some are telling you to go with your heart, really. The word says the heart is wicked.

This is why we as believers are confused we are doing the guessing game, being led into insanity with denominations and religion. Jesus died and the veil was destroyed from the top down that we may build a relationship with him. It is time to get off of the nipple and eat some meat open the Bible, read it, study it and get into a relationship with him and out of religion. Study to show thyself approved. Yes we can help each other grow but really what does the book you have say about baptism.

In the book of Acts the people received the Holy Baptism in the room and I do not recall it saying anything about being baptized with water. Jesus was baptized out of tradition. Remember John felt Jesus should be baptizing him and the heavens opened.

Wow no wonder the world is jacked up because we the body are and the world is looking to us for an answer and we can't open the book and read.

Peguesshawn - posted on 04/30/2013

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I researched infant/child baptism and here is what i came across. Although the topic was about godparents it gave a clear answer from the scriptures whether baptism for infants/children was scriptural.

● Is it Scriptural to act as a godparent or to designate godparents for one’s children?—U.S.A.
The practice of designating some person or persons other than the parents as godparents for an infant or child at the time of its solemn baptism and, later, at the individual’s confirmation, is a ritual of the Catholic Church. The practice also applies to adults when baptized or confirmed.
In the baptism of infants the godparents or sponsors (usually relatives or friends who are baptized persons) ask “faith from the Church of God in the child’s name.” (The Catholic Encyclopedia) They also make a profession and declaration of faith and ask for baptism, in the child’s name. In the case of default of the parents, that is, their failure to bring up the child in the Catholic faith, the godparents are obligated to instruct it concerning faith and morals.
In the rite of confirmation (like baptism, considered a sacrament) usually another person (or persons), different from the godparent(s) designated at the time of the child’s baptism, acts as sponsor or godparent. He or she must be one well instructed in the Catholic faith.
What is the Scriptural position regarding this practice? First of all, infant baptism is unscriptural. In view of the fact that ‘receiving the word with one’s ears’ and ‘doing penance’ precede water baptism, and that baptism requires the individual to make a solemn decision, it is apparent that he must be of an age to do these things himself. (Acts 2:14, 38, 41, Douay Version) The apostle Paul writes: “For, with the heart, we believe unto justice: but, with the mouth, confession is made unto salvation.” (Rom. 10:10, Dy) This an infant or very small child could not do. Thus infant baptism is ruled out by the Scriptures.
Moreover, no person can actually believe with the heart or make confession by mouth for another person. True, the apostle Paul pointed out that obedient minor children are “holy” because of the faithful parent. This is because God holds the parents, not some outside individuals, responsible for the children. (1 Cor. 7:14) God thereby makes a kind provision in behalf of his faithful servants. But when such children come to the age of responsibility they are no longer covered by this arrangement. Each has to stand or fall according to his own personal faith.—Rom. 14:4; Ezek. 18:20.
It is true that the apostle Paul said to the congregation at Corinth: “For if you have ten thousand instructors in Christ, yet not many fathers. For in Christ Jesus, by the gospel, I have begotten you.” (1 Cor. 4:15, Dy) However, Paul was not any “godfather” to this congregation. Rather, he had originally brought to them the gospel by which they became believers. In a spiritual sense he became a father to them through this life-giving message, though other persons had a later share in instructing them. Paul was forced to remind the Corinthian Christians of this fact because they were being seduced away from Christ by false apostles. It was not that he demanded to be called “Father,” or that he was referring to a church-appointed position of godfather.—2 Cor. 11:3, 13.
Today in many places the practice of having godparents is only a formality. The godparent usually gives the child a gift, and thereafter often has little to do with the child, as to training him in the faith. Nevertheless, since the principle is based only on Catholic tradition and is contrary to the Scriptures, true Christians will avoid any connection with such practice.

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Baptizing an infant is just ridiculous. Let your child decide if he wants to follow a religion. I don't believe in raising a child in any religion because the parent follows it. I believe in teaching a child to be a good person and letting them choose their own path. If he wants to look into religions when he's older, then so be it.

Laura - posted on 04/30/2013

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our church practices baptism and infant dedication. The dedication is really more of the parents saying they will raise their child in the church and "raise them up in the way they should go."
Baptism is viewed as signifying acceptance of the saving work of Jesus Christ given to all who freely believe in Him as Savior, baptism is a symbol of the new covenant of grace.

Debbie - posted on 04/30/2013

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oh, and the capitalized words are not me yelling....but I just wanted to emphasize the different things God expects of us prior to baptism. :D

Stacey - posted on 04/30/2013

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There is probably misunderstanding so to speak. In the episcopal world (and possibly other branches of Christianity) we call baptism what others call christening. We call confirmation what others call baptism. Baptism in my church was baptizing the baby into Christian upbringing and "giving" your child's life to God. Confirmation was once the child was at least 12 (having to do with the age believed that a child was old enough to know right from wrong etc) and they made the choice to give their life to God. (Confirmed their beliefs hence the 'confirmation') when my first child was born we invited my in laws to his baptism. She didn't show. My family was upset and offended. We felt she didn't care enough to be bothered to show up. When my second child was born I called and invited her again. This time she stated she didn't believe in baptizing a baby because the baby didn't know what it meant and that's when I realized it was the terminology used and I explained it was actually the same thing as a christening and that what she called a baptism we call confirmation. So in a way you were both right :)

Miriam - posted on 04/30/2013

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I agree. It's how I was raised. I think it's wrong to baptize someone without them being able to understand what it means.

Debbie - posted on 04/30/2013

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Let me answer this question with the Bible. God tells us in Mark 16:16 that whoever BELIEVES and is baptized will be saved....Acts 2:38 REPENT and be baptized FOR the remission (forgiveness) of your sins...Acts 19:5 On HEARING this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Sin is a transgression or a violation & rebellion against God I Jn 3:4. We also have to be able to confess our sins I Jn 1:9. A baby or small child does not have the ability to process right from wrong yet. They are born sinners, yes, we all are, but we have to be able to understand we are sinners. We have to be able to hear, process, and understand what God teaches and be willing to live our lives for Him. Until we can understand that, we are not accountable. God's love and mercy covers us. But, when we reach the age of accountability...which will be different for each person....Then and only then will God hold us accountable for what we have done and the need for his forgiveness and the obedience of baptism will be necessary. There are so many scriptures to support this but this post would be way too long, but this about sums it up I think.

Stephanie - posted on 04/30/2013

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On that note, infant Baptism doesn't seem to make much biblical sense to me and I would personally choose to have my sons and daughter dedicated and hope that they'd come to the Lord to be baptized on their own some day. Until than, it is my job to train them up as God's children alongside the church. This is an issue in my family because my husband is Catholic and we are a bit divided, although he eventually chose not to have our children baptized in the Catholic church, I initially opposed the idea of infant baptism because its not what I believe in doing, but than told him that as his wife I believe he has the final say in making that decision. My daughter is 5 and my son is 2 1/2 and neither were baptized and we are due 8/8/13 with no plans to baptize this child at the Catholic church either. We attended mixed church services and have been going to a local Lutheran church the most but sometimes attend the Catholic church my husbands parents attend and that my husband previously always had attended. We also sometimes attend other types of church :-)

Stephanie - posted on 04/30/2013

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I am of the Baptist church and we only believe in one Baptism, not multiple?

K - posted on 04/30/2013

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If you don't believe the orthodoxy of your chosen sect, then do whatever you like.

If your pastor is not affiliated with any particular sect, then you're starting at the beginning of the doctrinal wars of the reformation all-over again. The reason that sects broke off from the Catholic Church was as a result of doctrinal disputes around things like baptism. But it's all been hashed out, long, long ago - no reason to try to figure it out yourself, with little theology, or with the help of other people who haven't thought deeply about it.

I'm always amazed that people have no real idea of what the doctrine of their church is. No doubt, if more people knew, they would be running out the church doors.

Personally, I feel that baptism disrespects people. Humans are born socially cooperative, by nature. Genetics and environmental stress/support determine character, while symbolic washing affects neither. Honor the natural goodness in your child, instead of looking at him/her as a sinner, and forgo this old Jewish tribal rite.

Leslie - posted on 04/30/2013

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The verses that refer to "households" being baptized - they don't actually say that there were children in those households, and Acts 8:12 specifically follows "households" with "Men and Women." We can't just assume that households always involve babies.

Stacy - posted on 04/30/2013

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After giving careful consideration of your comment this what I have to say about baptizing infants/children. The word baptize means to bury or to put under... The Bible does not say to baptized children/infants specifically, just to train them up the way they should go (Proverbs 22:6). God/Jesus has a soft spot for infants/children. God makes provision for the innocent children (Matt. 19:14, Mark 7:27). For this reason we do not have to baptize them, but rather dedicate them to the Lord. To dedicate a child to God means you are promising to raise them to know Jesus and the Word and the church promises to help in that endeavor as well. Most of the time children do not realize they sinning, but adults are aware of their own sin. The age of awareness is between 10 and 12 years of age. In the Judaism culture/religion a boy or a girl becomes a man or a woman when they turn thirteen, the age they become aware of their actions. The reference to "original sin" is a reference to Adam and Eve's sin in the garden, not being born. Infant baptism is a tradition of man, not God. Hope this clarifies things, be blessed!

Karen - posted on 04/30/2013

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sorry, but the Mormon's do not baptize a person more than once. Only if they have been excommunicated from the church can one be baptized again. I am a Mormon and I know this for a fact.

Buiscuit - posted on 04/30/2013

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There is no right or wrong answer.. It depends on the tradition you follow. I am assuming you are Christian, and within Christianity there are different customs. The Catholics believe only in 1 baptism for original sin, after that they practice reconciliation (confession) and the sacrament of communion. Baptists and Mormons actually allow multiple baptisms to signify a period of rebirth and fortification of the presence of god in someone's life.

The tradition you follow is up to you, but there really is no RIGHT answer, its simply representative of what tradition you follow. It might be helpful to make yourself more aware of the differences in the traditions so you can make the best decision for yourself.

Karen - posted on 04/30/2013

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In our church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we baptize children when they are 8 years of age. By then they are old enough to understand the ordinance and right from wrong. And we baptize the same way that Jesus was baptized...by full immersion. We do not believe in baptizing babies, as they have not sinned yet, nor are they old enough to understand all of the above or to be fully immersed. I, personally do not believe in baptizing babies. My brother was upset because I did not attend his daughter's baptism when she was a newborn. We bless the babies and give them a name, by which they will be known on church records (their given name).

Kelsey - posted on 04/30/2013

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I really don't think that you have to wait for them to know what sin is and do it. That is silly. I have see many babies baptized! My daughter was a baby when she was baptized and then learned later what sin was. But we are Catholic and when she learned about sin in her church class, they went to confession. But all in all I think it should be totally up to the parent and what they believe! Not what some pastor said. ( Just being truthful)

Anita - posted on 04/30/2013

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As a former Baptist who converted to Lutheranism, I had a lot of issues with this (converted because I got married). Personally, I think it's really up for interpretation and you need to follow what your church says if you want your child baptized there. Some denominations won't do it until they are old enough to confess.

After being raised Baptist and coming to understand what it means, I say go ahead and half the baby baptized. Baptism really has absolutely nothing to do with us and what we do for God, it's God coming down and marking us as his children--all about what He does for us. I don't explain it as well as some ppl I know, but it's like God is offering Himself to us-it's our decision (when we are able to make it) to follow him or not.

And let me put it another way--when we are children (infants) we are completely dependent upon our parents to do EVERYTHING for us. They provide us with nourishment, a place to rest and they wash us clean. Think of us as infants with God. We depend on Him the same way a baby depends on his parents. Our faith is supposed to look like that. When we are babies, we depend on our parents to raise us up in that faith, so with infant baptism, it's really our parents making that declaration for us.

Like I said, I don't explain it as well as others do, but that's what I believe. You have to ask yourself what YOU believe and then go to a church that believes the same thing. All in all, I don't believe that if you do one or the other than that means you're choosing heaven or hell--I believe that if you believe in Jesus Christ and trust that He died for your sins, then you'll get where you want to go. That's really the key, what denomination you are, I don't think really matters.

I know there's so much more I want to say, but I won't take up any more space! Good luck and God bless!

Kristy - posted on 04/30/2013

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The religious world has all kinds of ideas about baptism, worship, and living a Christian life. The only answers that we can rely on are the ones we find in the Bible. The Bible teaches that each soul is responsible for his sins (Ezekiel 18:20). We all realize that the sins of a our parents can have earthly consequences (consider a baby born addicted to a drug because of her mother's drug abuse), but these earthly consequences do not separate our soul from God. We are saved by grace, but we are also saved by repentence, by hope, by baptism, by faith. Jesus had given his life for the people present on the day of Pentecost, he had extended grace to them. After the words of Peter, they believed in Jesus, they had faith, but they still asked what must they DO to be saved. Peter responded that they should "repent and be baptized for the forgiveness of your sins" (Acts 2). If they wanted to be forgiven of their sins, individually, they had to repent-make the choice to turn away from living a life displeasing to God, and they also had to be baptized. The baptism happened then, in water, and because of their obedience they were then saved. They didn't know everything about being Christians, but they understood what they needed to do to be saved. We all need to look to the Bible to see what it says, and not listen to what a pastor, a preacher, a teacher, or even our parents tell us. Here is a link for a more in depth online study. The answers will come only from the Bible, and the study will link you to a teacher who is a member of the church that wants only to be like the church of the New Testament...the called out that Christ called his bride, his body, and his saved. http://truthfortheworld.org/bcc/courses/...

Karen - posted on 04/30/2013

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I'm thankful that others like you have responded Biblically and kindly.

Tracy - posted on 04/30/2013

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I totally agree. In my church we have Baby Dedications where the church comes alongside the family and commits to help and pray for that child and their family. Ten, when the child is older and understands what. San is and has asked Jesus to come into their heart and be their savior, then they are ready for baptism. This is the Biblical pattern for baptism.

Laurie - posted on 04/30/2013

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Baptism is a Biblical issue; therefore ought to be dealt with Biblically, don't you think? No where in the Bible is it mentioned that babies were baptized. No where does it say that if a baby or young child dies without baptism, that child will go to hell. In fact, if you look back at the life of David and his adulterous relationship with Bathsheba, you will note that his infant son conceived in that relationship died and David said that he would see him again one day. If infant baptism had been a key to David being able to say that, I believe that God would have been sure to include that in the account.
In the New Testament, baptism is frequently mentioned along with words such as "believe" or "repent". An infant or very young child is not able to comprehend sin or the need to believe or repent. This knowledge usually doesn't occur until they are at least 5 years old or older. Baptism is not the way to heaven, it is the outward sign of the inward change that occurs with belief in the saving blood of the Lord Jesus Christ, personal confession of that sin and a desire to live a life that would be pleasing to God. May the Lord bless you in your search for Truth regarding this issue of great importance.

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