breastfeeding

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Teresa - posted on 07/20/2014

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My 10 year old was born at 28 weeks and five days. We couldn't even try for the first month, so my first experience was with pumping. AS soon as he could though we put him to the breast, but he got colostrum and the first month by pumping, and supplemental formula. Not what I had planned but it all worked out in the end.

Chet - posted on 07/19/2014

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i'm really sorry Jodi. I'm not trying to correct you. I apologize if it came off that way.

My intent was for the overall content of the thread to contain a more fully formed response. My concern was that with my first post only asking questions, and your reply starting with "right from day one" the thread didn't really contain the proper answer... not in an obvious way at least.

Under optimal circumstances a mother establishes a solid nursing relationship with good nursing technique, and also establishes her supply to roughly match the needs of the baby, before she starts pumping. That is the ideal, and for good reasons - the risk of over supply problems, hind/fore milk balance issues, nipple confusion, the association between early bottle feeding and earlier weaning, etc.

In the case of a premature baby, or a medically compromised baby who clearly can't nurse, a mother should start pumping immediately.

Of course, the ideal is not always possible, and it may not be immediately obvious that a baby can't nurse. How long a mother and baby should be given to establish nursing before it's determined that early pumping is necessary depends. It really needs to be assessed on a case by case basis.

Typically a mother will produce colostrum for 72 hours after birth though, so you don't need to start pumping the first day for your baby to get colostrum. People worry that babies are hungry if they don't nurse well right away, but even babies who do nurse well don't typically take in much during their first 24 hours (it can be less than a ounce).

Again, I am really sorry that my post upset you. I do apologize.

Jodi - posted on 07/19/2014

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I'm sorry, did I suggest you were wrong in some way? I was just offering my view from personal experience. Is that somehow invalid? I wasn't addressing you! I was suggesting that it is POSSIBLE right from day one, but not recommended, and gave an example of why I had to. Please don't lecture me on my advice based on my experience. Actually please don't lecture me at all because I am not needing your advice. Besides, if you read my post PROPERLY, you will see I did say that they shouldn't unless necessary.

Have you ever HAD a child who can't nurse (and please don't give me the bullshit about every child can nurse, blah, blah)? Believe me, I GET nipple confusion and the rest of it. I've BEEN there. I was simply giving advice based on the fact that sometimes it is necessary.

And I'm sorry, it pisses me off that you are trying to correct me when I never said it was a good option and I stated that I wouldn't recommend it unless it was necessary (and sometimes, it is). Did you not read my comment "If there isn't a reason for it though, why not just feed from the breast?". So why are you arguing with that?????? I was not disagreeing with you.

Chet - posted on 07/19/2014

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@Jodi - Not everybody pumps to feed a baby who can't nurse. If you're pumping to stockpile frozen milk, or to give the baby bottles when you're at work, it's best to let your supply become established before you start pumping.

Pumping and nursing together in the early days can produce an oversupply that results in the baby getting only foremilk with no hind milk (which means not enough fat). For a baby who will nurse, a combination of nursing and pumping can introduce problems with nipple confusion.

Jodi - posted on 07/19/2014

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Right from day 1 with the colostrum. But I wouldn't say you should. If, however, it is necessary (I had to as my baby had an underdeveloped sucking reflex), you should be shown how to go about it immediately. If there isn't a reason for it though, why not just feed from the breast?

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