Can anyone share their insights about babies and night terrors?

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Jo - posted on 03/25/2009

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both my youngest daughters have suffered from night terrors.one has now appeared to have out grown them,but the other now nearly 7 has 3 or 4 a year.I finr that talking calmly and quitely and cuddleing and stroking her works very well.she usually settles within 10 mins.hope this helps.we all know what you are going through and how frightening for you it is xx

Kara - posted on 03/25/2009

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i have a 15 year old who went through this until he was about 10 years old, i also have a 10 year old daughter who has just stopped having them about a year ago, i found that sitting on the bed beside them just talking to them, my daughter would say things like it's on my bed! i had no idea what she was talking about but i would go along with it & pretend to find it for her & though it out the window, then i would start to ask her questions about it & the more she talked about the more awake she became, i found that slowly wakeing her was the best idea! i always knew when she was awake when she would look at me & say what are you talking about mum lol!

hope this is some help!

[deleted account]

My daughter had several night terrors as a child, she's 15 now and hasn't had any in years.  Her last one was before puberty set in so about 11 or 12 years old or so.  She hasn't had any problems since.  It would help her to talk about them or write about them in a journal she kept near her bed.  They've since become some great sources for writing ideas and she wants to be an author some day.  We never made a big deal out of it.  I would lie down with her once she was out of the worst of it though she rarely remembers that part of it.

Kerry - posted on 03/25/2009

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My daughter has suffered with night tremors all her life, however after her latest flu like symptoms she has had increased accurances with tremors she was getting shivers and stomach aches and she would have 3-4 a day for 3 days it was scary and she has become upset with the fact she has them and can't remember. She has recalls where she thinks she almost did something and I inform her that it really happened, like throwing an apple against a basement wall then going back to her room. She'll be determined to find something hiding in the closets dragging me with her to prove it to me, she even pulls out art supplies sits at the table then starts crying and yelling usually I can't understand her. It scares me because she will talk to me during one and sometimes she knows it is me but she is somewhere else. There are times I get her calmed down only to have her come back out or yell my name still disoriented. I'm taking her to see a pediatrician just to cross off any problems, but I do feel it can come on due to tiredness, stress, anxiety and over stimulation right before bed. So I'm still concerned.........

Chelsea - posted on 03/24/2009

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When I was a kid they had to give me drugs to shut off my dream stimulation because my nightmares were so real to me. I was terrified of everything and still hate the dark. A couple ideas I've come up with or seen in toddlers is giving them an m and m before bed and telling them it's anti monster medicine or somthing stupid like that in an old medicine container you have and letting them go around and check everything that scares them. There is a light up turtle that puts starts and ocean scenes on walls and ceilings also that really helps my 4 year old cousin.

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Peggy - posted on 12/09/2011

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Yes.I had posted it to another place but wanted everyone to know how we stopped it. My Sons Dr.told us for three nights in a row to let our Child fall sound asleep, then gently awaken him so that he knew he was awake.Comfort him and then tell him to go back to sleep. If this didn't brake his night terrors, then repeat another three nights. We were so happy that the first three nights broke the habit. His night Terrors were very horific! It was like he was being tortured before our eyes.I pray this will help everyone who reads this.

Carrie - posted on 03/25/2009

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Prayer.  The spirit world is very real.  None of my children had night terrors until my step son went to visit his mom in another state.  She sent him home with a book about moving objects with your mind.  The day he got home the night terrors started and lasted a few days.  We asked him if he brought anything home with him from his mothers.  He showed us the book.  We threw it in the trash can outside.  That night - no more night terrors.  Coincidence?  No. 

Tabitha - posted on 03/25/2009

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The most important thing is to not pick them up! Just touch their back or sing or something and let them work through it by themselves.

Kerry - posted on 03/25/2009

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Thanks I find it best to talk her out of it too till she wakes up and looks at me all confused like what are you doing mom lol. I have been wondering lately interesting you should bring that up if it could be related to getting close to going through puberty cause she is getting close I think she is already getting acne. Although I know that isn't the main cause however just the recency of them I wonder MMMMMMM....... Thanks for your thoughts everyone it is great to read other peoples experiences and get other coping ideas.

Cheyenne - posted on 03/25/2009

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My 5 month old has been screaming/crying, usually three times at 5-15 min. intervals right after I put her to sleep, could this be night terrors? I usually pat her back and she goes right back to sleep. Can they start when they are so young?

Mary - posted on 03/24/2009

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My daughter had them. Occassionally still has them. She's five. My pediatrician at the time told me to give her a multi-vitamin on a daily basis. They don't know why but with some children it helps the terrors not be as bad or subside altogether.  It was helpful but didn't completely eliminate them.

[deleted account]

My 3.5 year old son started having night terrors recently.  When I asked several mom friends about it, I was told by one mom that her children stopped having them after she took them off zyrtec.  I immediately stopped giving him zyrtec and he hasn't had one since.

Michele - posted on 03/24/2009

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My son had them pretty bad when he was 2, shortly after he had been ill with Rotavirus, which I feel contributed to his night terrors.  I did some research and found out that night terrors occur within the first few hours of falling asleep and that you should wake them slightly about 15 to 30 minutes before they would normally have a night terror, it should help them not have one.  The key is to break the sleep cycle, apparently they get trapped in a specific sleep mode and need help transitioning to deep sleep (I believe it was on Dr. Sears website -  not certain).  It really did work.  I did that for about a week and we have not seen one since (that was over two years ago).  During an episode, as hard as it is, you just have to leave him alone.  I would just make sure he didn't hurt himself and wait it out.  They usually lasted about 10 to 20 minutes.   I hope this helps.

Theresa - posted on 03/24/2009

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Nancy, thank you for posting this question! I have a 4 yr. old who has always had troubling sleeping through the night. Since she was a baby, she has woken up in the middle of the night crying & sometimes screaming. I had never heard of night terrors until about 1 1/2 yrs. ago through a friend. I have never had her diagnosed by a Dr. but some of these stories on here really helped me to understand what she may be going through. My poor baby, I hope she does grow out of it, I just want her to have peace at night. Thanks again for this question-I will definitely do more research for my daughter's sake!

[deleted account]

my son gets them when he has had red dye #40 which is found in a lot of processed food and in most medicine, we now buy dye free.

Anita - posted on 03/23/2009

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My daughter had them from 15mon till 4yrs. Thats when we had her tonsils and adnoids out. she couln't breath through her nose and was not sleeping like she was suppose to. she never snored but was a heavy mouth breather. that's when we discovered she had sleep apnea. after the surgery she stopped having terrors and she was able to concentrate better at doing things like coloring.

Kristeen - posted on 03/23/2009

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All three of my boys get them, they call for me, but don't recognise me when I am there until Ican manage to get them fully awake. I talked to the doctor about it, they are common and tend to have a reltionshipwith overheating. I have noticed that whenever my boys do have them they have been really hot, so I try to be careful about too many covers/ overly warm pj's, and it has reduced the frequency, but they haven't disappeared completely. The other factors that are said to contribute are being overtired & over stimulation at bedtime.

Kristeen - posted on 03/23/2009

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All three of my boys get them, they call for me, but don't recognise me when I am there until Ican manage to get them fully awake. I talked to the doctor about it, they are common and tend to have a reltionshipwith overheating. I have noticed that whenever my boys do have them they have been really hot, so I try to be careful about too many covers/ overly warm pj's, and it has reduced the frequency, but they haven't disappeared completely. The other factors that are said to contribute are being overtired & over stimulation at bedtime.

Jennifer - posted on 03/23/2009

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My youngest son has these alot...I also am convinced they are hereditary because my husband used to sleepwalk and has sleep paralysis on occasion. I don't think there's much a doctor can do about it. I usually find that it can be helpful to try to wake my son up when he's having sleep terrors by talking to him or putting him in a warm bath, but it's not always possible to wake him. Otherwise I just sit with him and rub his back until it passes.

Nicole - posted on 03/23/2009

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my two year old son has them for the past 6 months every few weeks.  Usually when he is overtired or sick.  There is not much you can do but sit close by and try to make sure your child doesn't get hurt.  Its heartbreaking for you but they do not know it is happening.  i've tried consoling him but nothing works you just have to keep reminding yourself its harder on you than on them :(

Sarina - posted on 03/22/2009

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i've read that you can break the cycle, if you wake them up before it happens, so if you know it happens at 11:00pm wake them up just before that and keep them awake

past eleven pm... hope it helps.

Barb - posted on 03/22/2009

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The terrors were worse for all the other family members than my son. He had them from 3 yrs to aobut 10 yrs & then they suddenly disappeared. His first one was when he was very ill. He never seemed to remember them in the morning, but none of us could forget the bloodcurdling screams. Now that he is grown, he remembers them as bad dreams crossed with monsterlike people instead of us, when we were trying to comforting him.



Just holding him till he calmed seemed to help when he was small

Nancy - posted on 03/22/2009

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Thank you all for sharing your experiences and your helpful comments.  My granson had a night terror last night and my poor daughter was near hysterical thinking something was very, very wrong.  I remembered one of my friend's son use to have them from time to time and I was there during one of his terrors.  I was also there last night during my grandson's night terror.  I knew not to wake them and to hold and soothe them until they worked through it.  I also had to reassure my daughter that he was going to be okay.  It was truly scary for her.



 

[deleted account]

My son, he's one, has night terrors.  I think he's remembering his hospital stay (he was born 14 wks early and spent 114 days in hospital).  When it happens I go to his room, put my hand on his back and tell him "it's okay, Mommy's here" and he calms after a minute or so.  As he gets older they're happening less often.



My best friend's boy is 5 and he gets night terrors.  He's a sensitive boy and seems to get night terrors when he's worried about something.  all my friend can do is hold him until he calms on his own.

Heidi - posted on 03/22/2009

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Hi Nancy



In the Parents magazine April 2009 issue there is a small artice on Night Terrors on page 32.  It goes to say that they may be triggered by sleep deprivation, fever, and certain medicines.  Research found that genetics play a role too.  Usually children grow out of it by 30 months...advice, don't touch or talk to he/she during a terror-it can make it last longer...just stay in the room until it's over to be sure he/she doesn't bolt up or injure themselves.

Christina - posted on 03/22/2009

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My 17 month old son has been having night terrors since he was a few months old. I find that when hes teething he has episodes. i just put him in bed with me rub his head and give him a cuddle and talk to him softly n calmly  and he usually calms down fairly quickly thankfully.

Rene - posted on 03/22/2009

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My 11 year old started having them really bad just before he turned two.  They were every night for several months and nothing I could do would calm him.  I thought it was just bad dreams until I went on the internet and read about night terrors.  We went to a doctor and he said they are hereditary, although my husband nor I had them.  He also said he would grow out of it.  He got much better after about 6 months of starting them but he still will wake me up sometimes at night screaming out in his sleep.  The doctor also said "night terrors" are better than nightmares because nightmares can be triggered by abuse, etc. and night terrors are not.



The other thing I was told about them was to leave them alone unless they were flailing so much that they could hurt themselves.  Even to this day my son doesn't remember any of them. 



I know what you're going through!

Anne - posted on 03/22/2009

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My son (now 237)used to have them during the time that he was potty training. He would sleep walk also and once we found him in the bathroom during a sleep walking/night terror episode and helped him use the potty. After that, once he would start to scream we would take him directly to the potty and that would be the end of it. We figured out that subconsciously he knew he shouldn't wet his bed but couldn't find his way to the bathroom in his sleep. It lasted several months then one night he got up and went to the bathroom on his own and never had another night terror.

Natascha - posted on 03/22/2009

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i found for my son and his is i would talk to him in a wisper and tell him it is ok and that it is just a dream and then after a while he calms down

Natascha - posted on 03/22/2009

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i found for my son and his is i would talk to him in a wisper and tell him it is ok and that it is just a dream and then after a while he calms down

Natascha - posted on 03/22/2009

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i found for my son and his is i would talk to him in a wisper and tell him it is ok and that it is just a dream and then after a while he calms down

[deleted account]

I know this may sound strange but my son who is now 9 went through them for about two years and the best thing I found was giving him a warm shower. It would wake him up enough to come round. Found that it worked by accident as he would be screaming that he was being bitten and we tried it cos we though he might have something on his skin - he would be asleep but screaming and shouting. Some of my friends have tried this and it has worked for them.

Anita - posted on 03/22/2009

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my health nurse told me by about 12 months children start to remember things and events...be aware with whats exposed to them through telelvision...even childrens programs can leave some emotional "scaring" and cause them to have nightmares eg..Thomas and Friends for my lil one leaves him crying and scared when he sees crash scenes..u also need to allow some time for ur lil one to whine down and not over stimulate them..

Carleeh - posted on 03/22/2009

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my son has had night terrors his whole life and he is now 8yrs old...they are difficult because you shouldn't wake them. I have always just tryed to calm him down and tell him it is ok and where he is...he tends to shake and sweat. usually i just bring him into bed with me and rub his face until he nods back off to sleep. I have talked to different doctors most just stay the same thing "try to calm him down" that's it.  now i try to limit what he sees and hears to maybe help with the bad dreams. he also used to talk to the walls as a baby and refused to sleep in certain places in his room....it was weird....he does tend to have them when he was overly tired or had a stressful day....neither I or his father had them, but i have very vivid nightmares when i was a kid due to scary movies and parents fighting....

Myra - posted on 03/22/2009

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All babies and children see spirit, it is conditioned out of childrren by adultas as they grown older. Teach your children about Angels, learn how to protect yourself and your family in white light and how to call on the protection of the Angelic Realm. Often reading Angel books with older children and then every night get the kids to ask the Angels to stand in the door way to watch over them while sleep- fixes it everytime.

When we are alseep we are most open, thats why adults have night terrors also. Spirit, with a lower vibrating frequency, get up to no good when we are at our most vulnerable, protection is a must.

Maybe make up your family's very own prayer and start a tradition of reciting it every night?

[deleted account]

Hi Nancy



My 3 year old daughter went through a faze of night terrors and would be screaming, kicking, trying to get out of bed. It was really horrible to watch and I couldn't wake her up. I found a really good website that helped me understand them called http://www.kiwifamilies.co.nz/Topics/Par... Basically as my daughter would have night terrors at the same time every night i would wake her up 15 minutes before and try to get her to go to the toilet for about 4 nights in a row. After that it broke the cycle and she stopped having the night terrrors.



I hope this helps.



Kellie

Justine - posted on 03/22/2009

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My doctor told me not to worry about them at all.  Yes they can be hereditary (my other son sleepwalks and his Dad also had night terrors).  My doc said there's nothing that can be done apart from comfort and avoid upsetting or over stimulating events before bedtime.

Alissa - posted on 03/22/2009

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Hey! My experiance with Kiona my 29 month old. I've had night terrors since I was 17 years old. I was told by many doctors that it can be inheritated. I would seriously talk to her/his doctor asap. I would have them have a comfort item, and cuddle when they're scared. But that's just me!

Justine - posted on 03/22/2009

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Hi, my 4 year old son gets them fairly frequently.  Have researched on the internet and apparently it's similar to sleep walking and there's nothing to really stop them once they're happening.  you're not supposed to try and wake them (my son can't wake up while having one) and it's best just to hold them and cuddle them and gently reassure them.  They often occur if the child is unwell, overly tired or had an upset (heard a row etc) or change to routine.  My son usually gets them when he's over tired and when he's coming down with something.  Hope that helps

Kristie - posted on 03/22/2009

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Hi Nancy! I had the same thing happen to my 2year old at one point. Sometimes it is hard to tell what causes it. I think it would be very helpful to maybe give her or him a warm bath before bed as much as you need to. I think the baby aisle has some stuff out . johnson and johnson. One comes in a dark purple bottle and says something about nighttime. They also have something by johnsons which is lavendar and chamomile bath. I also prayed with my son justin and reassured him over and over mommy is here it's okay . I would comfort him as much as I could as often as I could. Hope I have helped you may the lord bless you and keep you when you feel discouraged or without hope. I hope your little one feels better soon.

[deleted account]

My daughter had them really bad when she was about 6 months old and all I could really do was lay a hand an her or rub her back while talking quietly to her. That seemed to ease them but their is no cure or explanation for them

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