child support after 18

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 08/04/2016

13,207

21

2014

If he is that severely restricted, is he on SSI?

You really haven't described anything abnormal. Plenty of people function on their own on anxiety meds, etc.

have you ever LET him do things? Encouraged him to do so? Or have you continually told him that you'll do things for him so he doesn't have to "worry"?

Seriously...Occupational therapy.

7 Comments

View replies by

Elizabeth - posted on 08/04/2016

4

0

1

yes he is quite high functioning, but is also very socially unaware, and anxious, and on meds for that. he has had to have special provisions through the years to attend school to lessen his anxiety and help him along. he has been talked into a few things to be "popular" that have gotten him in trouble, I cannot let him go out with any of his few friends and sleep overs are out of the question.but he does want to learn something to make a future for himself, and with myself on SSI also it seems unreasonable that his father not help. The onlt state I know of that forces the father to help is new jersey. was wondering if anyone had heard of it happening anywhere else. As in one of the states that uses the system that the schools use like an ARD or some sort of system where they monitor them and make suggestions and make sure they are on track.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 08/03/2016

13,207

21

2014

Aspie's kid are generally high functioning, and if given the proper "tools", do just fine. My eldest is an Aspie's kid, has been on his own since he was just shy of 19. Before that, he had a job, and paid rent to me.

It was a matter of allowing him to learn and grow within himself as he grew up.

Personally, my opinion is that child support beyond the age of 18 should not ever happen. That child is an adult. The only cases in which continued support are necessary are those in which the developmental or physical disabilities are severe enough to require continued care and supervision.

Occupational therapy may be helpful for your son. He is an intelligent young man, and he will need reassurance that he can do things on his own, but he should be able to make the transition. My son knows that if he needs me, I'm there for him, and he does come over for help or reassurance at times, but overall, he is pretty successful, for being 22 and still not quite sure of his true "calling". He's been through a couple jobs in different areas, still feeling his way, but everyone does that to an extent.

Elizabeth - posted on 08/03/2016

4

0

1

sorry, no i didn't. lol. my son has asperger's, and am being threatened with removal of child support as soon as he finishes school, He will graduate this next year, a senior now. We reside in Texas. He is not able to just jump out there and survive on his own, he has to he watched always,is very naive. Extremely smart in some areas, math for example but too anxious to live alone, and do day to day things on his own. he should be allowed to continue school to have time to learn these things and secure a future i believe, but i doubt he can do so here. Will I be forced to move to a state such as New Jersey to achieve that? Or anyone been able to do that in any other state?

Dove - posted on 08/03/2016

11,618

0

1348

I think in the US it is possible to receive child support after 18 in some cases if the child (who is an adult at 18) is a full time college student... but I don't know how that all works.

Jodi - posted on 08/03/2016

3,515

36

3906

Well, you haven't exactly asked a question or given any information, so I am just going to say this. First, why do you expect child support to continue once your child is an adult. Where I live, the only option after a child is 18 is if that child has not completed their Year 12, and you can apply for an extension. Bu even then, I expect a child of that age to be beginning to support themselves to a degree. If a child is earning an income of some sort (even if only part time while studying), they can take on some of the responsibility for some of their bills. So you'd need to have reasonable justification for it.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms