do you let your children SIP your drinks?

Kelsey - posted on 07/09/2012 ( 84 moms have responded )

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I read an article about an Arizona mom who put beer in her child's sippy cup and a restaurant and a table of on lookers called the police and she was arrested and charged. I was just wondering what everyone thought about this. I have a 3 year old daughter and I have let her take sips of wine and beer because most children*and adults* do not like the taste. I do not however allow my child to taste sips of coolers or anything mixed with pop because it is sweet and tastes just like juice most of the time. NOTED*** IM NOT TALKING ABOUT ALLOWING MY 3 YEAR OLD TO DRINK A WHOLE GLASS AND GET DRUNK OFF IT. A SIP IS DIFFERENT FROM A "DRINK"



http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2012/07...

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Shari - posted on 07/09/2012

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I'm a former alcoholic, so here's my view: you are doing your child, any age, a disservice to allow them even a sip. My parents brought me up with the belief that allowing a sip at just special occasions (Christmas & Easter) could do no harm, but for me, those little sips were all it took for me to crave alcohol - the first time I got drunk I was 14. When I was 21 I finally figured out that I couldn't tolerate even one sip, as once I start, I can't stop. Since you can't know if your child might be susceptible to alcoholism, why take a chance that you might be the one to lead them on that destructive path?

Kerstin - posted on 07/09/2012

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I've dipped my finger in the drink and let the kid have a taste of beer or wine. I think we've gone a little cookoo over the top freaking out about stuff like this in our culture, and I think the taboo of it is why our teenagers are some the worst binge drinkers in the world. A tiny taste does ZERO to them. The processed food all the "no way!" people are probably feeding their kids is way worse for their little bodies.

Krista - posted on 07/09/2012

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I don't give my kids sips, but I don't judge a parent if they let their kid have ONE tiny taste.

But the mother who put beer in the kid's sippy cup? She fully deserved to be charged. That's enough alcohol to cause SERIOUS damage to a small child.

Carol - posted on 07/09/2012

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We always allowed our children a sip. The are currently 35,33 and 31 all are grown contributing members os society. ( employed and paying taxer) none of them care to drink. Forbidding something makes it more desirable.

Kelsey - posted on 07/09/2012

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see and thats another thing kerstin people do tend to go crazy over little things.my family is from holland and ukraine and its not uncommon to see my younger cousins having wine at dinner time with the family because its just normal to us and our grandparents

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Lizzielucas - posted on 07/25/2012

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also kids are just curious!!!! its not like they ask for a sip to get smashed, you enjoy drinking it so they want to try

Lizzielucas - posted on 07/25/2012

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is this really a question. its practically a fact that all children hate the taste of alcohol, until its deemed cool by peers. if anything it will put them off it for the future. i cannot believe how much kids today are wrapped up in cotton wool

Roxanna - posted on 07/21/2012

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I grew up in a home where alcohol was a daily part of our lives. Our parents were alcoholics and although the drinking was only at home and with dinner, it seemed they needed a drink every night. We were served beer if we asked as early as 12 years old. I never snuck to get alcohol, becasue all I had to do was ask and if they said no, ok, soda it is. I never drank at my friends houses or when I went to the clubs (when I got older) with my friends. I see no harm in letting them have a taste.
I occassionally have a glass of wine at dinner and my 9 yar old will ask what I am drinking, I tell her, and she scrunches her nose, no desire to taste it. Unfortunately she tasted chocolate wine and boy did that backfire! But I digress. THe USA is so narrow minded compare to the European countries. Teach your kids responsiblilities.
But to address your post directly, kelsey, we shouldn't give our babies a sippy cup full of beer! If I was there, I think I would have beat the snot out of the Mom!

Sherri - posted on 07/13/2012

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I have too Dove I am sorry I am with Ashley on this one. I allowed my son who was maybe 18mo's a sip of my wine cooler. They are curious I see no harm. He is now 6 and could care less. He asks what we are drinking if we say alcohol he walks away.

I am a firm believer in sometimes not making things so taboo that they flock to it when they are older. If he sees my husband and I being responsible around alcohol. I see no big deal giving a sip here and there, then there is no mystery and no strong desire to run out and go hog wild when the time comes.

Heck they get more alcohol from the wine at communion at church every Sunday then they do with the one tiny taste from the bottom of my bottle.

Ashley - posted on 07/13/2012

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Well, we were having beer with our dinner, and she asked us what it was and said she wanted some, and we have a sort of "lead by example" rule -- we try not to eat/drink anything in front of her and tell her she can't have any. So we let her try it so she'd know what it tasted like. She hated it (which was the desirable result). Now she doesn't bother us about any "grownup drinks" we happen to drink in front of her because she knows it will taste gross!

Dove - posted on 07/13/2012

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But why let a THREE YEAR OLD choose alcohol at all? Maybe it's because I'm 100% against alcohol at all now, but I just can't understand the concept of allowing a preschool aged child access to alcohol... no matter how small of an amount it is.

Ashley - posted on 07/13/2012

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I really don't feel that letting her have one sip of an alcoholic drink is going to change her entire attitude towards it for the rest of her life. I agree with you, a parent must have common sense when allowing their child to make choices, which is why I don't let her choose between, say, one sip or the entire bottle.

Dove - posted on 07/13/2012

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The first time I tasted alcohol (with friends.. my parents didn't drink) I was 14. That was over 20 years ago and I definitely was not the youngest to try alcohol.

I let my 3 year old have choices like what outfit to wear for the day, what to eat for breakfast (among a couple of healthy choices), which Dora dvd to watch, etc.... I never let my 3 year old choose not to be buckled in the car seat, to cross the street unattended, or to try alcohol. Choices? Yes, absolutely, but the parent must use a little common sense when allowing a 3 year old to make potentially life altering decisions.....

Ashley - posted on 07/13/2012

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I don't think it will be her decision about alcohol for the rest of her life. I just mean it's her decision for the present. She won't ask us for sips of our alcohol because she knows she doesn't like it from the time I let her try it. I'd rather she know what it tastes like before I tell her no.

She's no doubt going to change her mind when she's older. By "empowering her", I meant that as a 3 year old, I let her decide whether or not she was going to do something, and I believe it's nice to let a young child make their own choices whenever possible.

It's actually similar to you guys letting the kids at the party try the alcohol: "See? You won't like this, it's gross." And now they know. They probably won't feel that way about it for the rest of their lives, but for the time being, they are turned off to the idea. Which is good, 'cause they're kids!

Also, are kids really trying alcohol at 12 to 15 now? Most of my friends and I didn't drink until after we graduated high school. Crazy.

Virginia - posted on 07/13/2012

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To each is there own. Its not for me to be doing it to my children. Everyone has different ways to do parenting.

Kristi - posted on 07/13/2012

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Ashley M.--
"But now she knows exactly what she thinks of beer and we actually empowered her by allowing her to make her own decision about it."

She's 3 1/2, do you honestly think 12-15 years from now she is going to think, "Oh, I didn't like beer when I was 3 or 4 so I'm not going to try it as a teen." Meanwhile, some/most of her friends will at least have tried it and will likely be asking her to do the same. "Empowering" a 3 year old to make "her own" decision about alcohol is just an absurd notion. Are you going to "empower" her to decide if she likes pot or sex, too? Or were you worried about what other people will think about your choice to give her a sip and this is your proud explanation as to why?

So here is my little story...
I know it won't hurt a preschooler and I highly doubt it will lead to alcoholism as a teen or an adult. Frankly, I see no reason to give them a swig at that age but to each their own. That being said, I gave my 11 and 9 yo a taste one night because they (our kids & my husband's friend's kids) wanted to know why Papi and his friends were acting like "crazy freaks." One of them yelled, "We aren't freaks, we are drunk!" (I know, right?) As it appeared everybody was having a great time, all the kids wanted to try it. I told them they wouldn't even like the smell but of course, the were unrelenting so I let them each take a swallow. (all the parents were game for this "experiment," I did not give other kids alcohol without their parents knowledge and permission) They, too, found it "gross," "sick," "disgusting" and someone mentioned barfing. Of course, everybody found this amusing, including the kids. Later that night, 3 of them, including my husband, puked at our house. So I rounded up all the kids and brought them outside where the 3 of them were throwing up by our fence. I told them this is what happens when you drink a lot of alcohol. They ran, shrieking, back in the house and some of them started wiping thier tongues off. lol Do I think this will curb their decision to drink, not really. More than likely, after that night, they will probably try it to see if it was as much fun as they remember their parents were having. If I'm lucky mine will get sick and hungover the 1st time they do and will learn their lesson quickly. Needless to say, that was the first and last party I let my husband have at our house.

But, I would call the cops if I saw someone pouring beer or coolers in a toddler's sippy cup, too.

Shari - posted on 07/12/2012

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Johnny, 18 is the legal age in France now - I just checked & it was raised up from 16 back in 2009 - the reason being that the government was concerned with the amount of teenage binge drinking - again, so much for early introduction preventing problems:

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/art...

However, legal drinking age was 14 in Paris back when I went on my school trip 24 years ago. A few of my classmates & I went into a McDonald's there & bought beer - we were asked for ID, showed our passports & allowed to buy. We were ID'd before we could enter into a Hard Rock Cafe copycat called City Rock Cafe, where the 15 year old's in our group were allowed to buy Heineken at the premium price of $8 a bottle, while us older kids (16) pooled in our money to buy a huge fishbowl of some kind of hard liquor mixture to share - the only reason I didn't get stone drunk in that place was because I didn't expect their high prices & had brought very little with me.

England's legal age has always been 18 if buying from a store or hard liquor, but back when I was there the rules were bent if you were in a licensed pub/restaurant/tavern or the like to 16, (just as I already stated), because it was assumed that you would be buying alcohol with a meal. However, every adult turned a blind eye to the fact that most of the teens weren't buying meals & were buying beer & wine to get drunk. And I was never ID'd in England - not even once, which is amazing because at 16 I looked more like I was 12! At least in France you never saw rowdy teens drinking in the streets - an all too common sight in London after 9pm, because it's not illegal to be intoxicated or drink in public, and still isn't to this day.

So you are dead wrong about my experiences being unusual occurrences or an illegal ones at that time. It is such a problem that there are many legislators, police officers, & other concerned citizens about the rise of teen drinking that both countries are pushing to raise limits again - especially in England where they want to jump it to 21 & eliminate public intoxication. Personally, I think the problems wouldn't be there if adults hadn't been irresponsible in giving their kids these so-called safe sips to begin with.

Katie - posted on 07/12/2012

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Yes, I most certainly do...coffee and/or pop is the worst of the "sips" I've ever let him taste....but, you know how it goes, you sit down with a drink/food and they instantly flock to you licking their lips, how can you resist?! :) Anything containing alcohol = NOOO WAY!!

Ashley - posted on 07/11/2012

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I gave my 3 and a half year old a sip of beer once, because she saw us drinking it and was curious. I told her it was "a grownup drink" but she didn't believe me, so I let her try it. I think it's important to let kids discover things for themselves. One sip did not hurt her and she absolutely cringed. Now she knows from first hand experience what it tastes like and she is NOT curious about our "grownup drinks" anymore -- she hates the taste!



I've also given her a sip of wine, but I don't think I would let her taste hard liquor. Of course I would not give her more than a sip. But now she knows exactly what she thinks of beer and we actually empowered her by allowing her to make her own decision about it.

Kimmi - posted on 07/11/2012

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My dad thought nothing of giving me the last 1/2 inch of beer from his Budweiser can when i was very small. Would i do that with my kids?? Although i never got drunk (and actually wound up disliking beer), times have definitely changed and so have i. There is NO WAY i'd have given my kids sips of beer at ANY time. When they became of age, then they got to choose whether they wanted a drink or not. They both do drink, but it wasn't because i had anything to do with it! They're 32 and 35, by the way.

As far as non-alcoholic drinks go, sure, i let them have a taste of whatever i was having.

Patricia - posted on 07/11/2012

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Each person is different.. Nowadays people call the cops on you for anything. They believed the lady was endangering her child shux parents use to give their kids cough syrup to put them to sleep. Now everything is illegal or a danger to your child.

We wonder why our kids are overweight the playground is two feet wide and two feet high. When I was a kid a sliding board was three stories high it, seemed, and you ran from one side of the playground to the other so obesity wasn't common. However that's a whole nother topic..

Melissa - posted on 07/11/2012

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My son is 4 and has never tasted wine, beer or any alcohol what so ever! He never asks to either, when he was younger he asked to and all we said was that is only for mommy and daddys and that was the end of him asking to taste it.

Claudia - posted on 07/11/2012

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Why would anyone want to start a child who is not old enough to understand the consequences of drinking hard liquor, drinking. It only takes a spark to start a fire. It only takes a sip to get a child started into a life of being a alcoholic and a drug user. Please don't do this to the child you love so dearly. Keep him/ her away from those things.

Halie - posted on 07/10/2012

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Nope i will not let my 4yr old daugther take a sip or even carry any anything to do with liquor like beer, wine, etc. she's 4. It's bad enough that her grandpa ask's her to go and get a beer for him. but i keep telling her to tell them that's not my job get up and get your own and now he gets his beer himslf he's just frick'n lazy( the granpa)

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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kelsey habraken, I think in their cup is ridiculous (az mom), your situation was clearly an accident, I would not consider you a bad mom for it.

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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I agree with the glass (you pick size, drink they will not like) at new year that one mom mentioned. my daughter's maturity and size will impact what age this would happen at

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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is there evidence against it? I know my daughter tried soda young and hates it.

I know I had beer young and only have it a couple times a year now as an adult. My grandma and dad both struggle with alcoholism.

Alcohol will be in my daughter's life, from office party toast to wine toasts at weddings it is nearly inevitable. Though good parenting should help her to understand alcohol is serious and only should be consumed in moderation and is not necessary to have fun. I don't want it to become taboo for her as it has other people I know of

Johnny - posted on 07/10/2012

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Shari, given that the legal drinking age in France is 18 and to purchase wine/beer in the UK is 16 and for hard liquor is 18, I have to point out that you were witnessing something quite rare seeing teens drunk in a pub. Having lived in the UK, and frequented many pubs as a young person, I was never able to drink nor did I ever see underaged people being served. The ony place it was legal to drink was in one's own private home. Admittedly, alcoholism is quite a serious problem in the UK, particularly binge drinking. And that is evident on the streets of any university town. I'm not sure that has all that much to do with their drinking age though, especially that you can witness similar behaviour at college campuses in the US where the drinking age is 21 and alcohol is far more taboo.

In France, it is illegal for those under the age of 18 to purchase alcohol. It is only permissible for them to be served in private homes but there are serious fines for allowing intoxication. I have not seen much youth drunkeness in France, although I'm sure like everywhere, it is a problem.

That's sort of my point, prohibition by age doesn't really seem to effect behaviour. I am not arguing that any country has any less alcoholism than others. I recently read a report on the levels of drug and alcohol addiction skyrocketing in many Muslim nations that entirely prohibit alcohol. My point is that it does not matter when or how people start drinking, some will become alcoholics and some will not. Giving a kid a sip of booze isn't sending them down some path to hell.

I also agree that correlation does not equal causation. The health of moderate drinkers can not be shown to be impacted negatively by drinking moderately whereas the health of heavy drinkers can be demonstrably effected. Whether or not moderate drinkers have other lifestyle factors that account for their slightly better health and longevity is debatable. The point being that responsible consumption is possible for many, and should not be impacted by other people's inability to manage their consumption. Just like my car can go up to 200 km/h, I choose not to speed and should not be held to account for those who do and end up causing carnage.

Christina - posted on 07/10/2012

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Hi ladies! I wanted to look up some information about other countries and drinking, and since I've been to Germany and already knew their view point I was not surprised in the information I found. I've included the link if anyone is interested.

http://mygermantravels.com/2011/04/germa...

I see both sides of this perspective that has been mentioned within this posting, but what I'd like to believe is that we, as parents, whom consider ourselves "responsible" (lacking apathy or loose judgment values) can make the decision as to whether or not it's ok to give our child a SIP of wine or beer (again, I think hard alcohol is too much). No, I'm not suggesting that it is appropriate to give infants a sip of anything alcoholic, but thats just my personal opinion.

Many have presented the very real and devestating disease of alcoholism. Yes, I believe that it is a disease, but I also believe that it was first a choice of behavior (lack of responsiblity). Harsh, I know, and this is NOT said to be unkind. I would hazard to not demonize alcohol, since, in itself, it is just a substance. What we do with it is the problem. I believe that those that know they have a family history of this propensity, you are a strong and responsible bunch of people who consciously make the choice to keep this out of your life.

I would like to ask that before anyone "beats me down" verbally that you take a look at the link and see a different perspective. Our culture has made certain topics "taboo", and we don't look at things the same as other countrys do. I can only imagine what some would say if you were to get a Quella catalog from Germany; they have nudity in them....(no, not porn, geez).

Angela - posted on 07/10/2012

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i started allowing my 12/13 year old one glass at new year, but i chose the drink that they (i hoped) they would dislike the most. alcholism is rife in my family too, and i just hate the idea that they would start to ruin their bodies before they have chance to actually live well. plus i see all these kids getting drunk out of their minds and worry that my kids will think that it is ok to be like that, i want to teach my kids that anything (almost) is ok in moderation, but too much is in no way good for you. but i don't buy them sweets and chrisps (potato chips) and pop (soda) unless it is a special occasion, due to the amount they get from their dads at the weeekend either. however i would never dictate how someone brings up their child, after all everyone has different opinions, as long as it isn't harming their child who is to say it is wrong?

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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"Those that struggle with alcoholism are going to have this battle regardless of when they had their first sip. Kids who are brought up under tight control are usually the first to rebel in many ways, and of that, there is a significant amount of supporting research."



Just thought I'd point out that I did address this an earlier post - it's not the actual forbidding of alcohol that leads to rebellion to seek it out - it's the poor parenting choices to be unreasonably strict or having inconsistent boundaries (or even zero boundaries). I do agree with you that research bears this out.



However, it is possible to be strict & yet reasonable - it's called setting limits, but treating your child with respect when you do it. Refusing to give your child a reasonable answer for those limits every single time is just asking for trouble.



I think many of us have encountered kids from families like that - where Mom & Dad were all "Because I said so" "Do what I say - it's my way or the highway" - always ready to hand out punishment but holding back any affection - yeah, those kids were very messed up indeed.

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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Actually Johnny, there is a lot of evidence showing that introducing children to alcohol does lead to problems - you have bought into the myth that other countries that teach youth to drink responsibly somehow have less alcoholics.

http://www.higheredcenter.org/services/a...

When I was in high school I went on a class trip to England & France - we could go into the bars at 16 & 14 respectively. I saw first hand plenty of teens completely blitzed out of their minds in all the bars I went to - they were either mildly drunk or puking drunk (which was considered funny by the others). In no way were any of the teens (or myself) in there drinking responsibly at all.

I have also read studies that contradict what I'm telling you, but if you "follow the money" you'll see that the ones endorsing alcohol consumption for better health are in fact funded by the alcohol industry.

Any person who has taken a course in logical fallacies knows that correlation does not equal causation - ergo, consumption of alcohol causing good health in moderate drinkers. There are many other healthy lifestyle factors involved that are ignored by those studies & results are purposely skewed to favor the alcohol industry to get people to buy their products.

There are others who can point this out to you:

http://alcoholism.about.com/library/bluc...
http://www.heraldsun.com/view/full_story...

There's so much more, but I really don't have the time to do research for everybody & the web is not the best place to get the most credible sources. Again, follow the money on who funds the so-called health reports of alcohol use - there is not anybody from the medical establishment who has done their research who has supported them.

Tracy - posted on 07/10/2012

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very young ages, no I wouldn't. However, my son was maybe 7 or so ...maybe 8, when I would allow him a sip from my wine (I buy it so rarely). He would ask about what I was drinking or hear us talking so I let him experience it for the flavors. There were some he liked, some he didn't. He's 15 now and the last person I ever have to worry about when it comes to subversive behavior. LOL, sometimes I think he needs to be a little crazy just to enjoy himself. He doesn't even allow himself SODA - AT 15 YEARS OLD - because he doesn't want the extra sugars. When my friend offered to let him drive her cadillac (he has his permit and she was in the car), he said he would like to but explained to her that she would have to be willing to take responsibility if there is an accident. Then he let her decide if she still wanted to offer him to drive her vehicle. She called me just laughing at how responsible he is. My daughter is 2 and I don't think I'd really give her anything alcoholic - although my dad has tried to give her tastes of margaritas and whatnot because he thinks it's funny. I don't like that he does that and he knows it. As long as I think she's on the same par with maturity as her older brother, I might be the same with her as I was with him and allow her some sips as she gets older. However, indications at this point say she is already wild and she won't be able to be trusted to handle sips maturely. I think it depends on the kid. Some of Sam's friends at 15 would definitely be the kind that I would say should never be allowed sips while others would treat it with the care and maturity it deserves. (not saying I would give other people's kids drinks either, just speaking as personalities go).

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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there is alcohol in our family's mouthwash, although, the front of the label says alcohol free. We surround children in environmental toxins and the plastics and whatnot that pollute their bodies. Studies show the umbilical cord holds over 200 known toxins. Before a baby is even born it was being poisoned. I think beer is less of a worry when I pray for my child than say her having childhood cancer, being without strong faith, being in an auto accident, or being abducted.

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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I didn't mean in any way that it (alcohol) was not addictive (in my mini rant about soda being bad). My family has a lot of experience with alcoholism and it's issues

I just mean that it is dismissed by too many people. It is a slow and toxic death, thankfully it is not as big s risk to others as it is to oneself.

my apologies to the woman who misunderstood my post.

Rachele - posted on 07/10/2012

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Absolutely not. I wouldn't drink an alcoholic drink in the presence of my children, much less introduce them to it!

Johnny - posted on 07/10/2012

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Shari, I am sorry that you are fighting the battle with alcoholism. Good for you for taking back the control and mending your life. It's a long fight, my great-uncle struggled in and out of AA for 40 years. One of my close friends is currently starting the journey.

The problem is there is no evidence at all to back up your assertion that allowing young kids a sip of alcohol (which I actually don't do as I don't see a point) or introducing teens to the occasional watered down drink on special occasions has any greater chance in turning a kid into alcoholics than not doing this at all. There are alcoholics that come from homes that abstain entirely, from homes where drinking is done responsibly, and from homes where the parents are alcoholics.

Those that struggle with alcoholism are going to have this battle regardless of when they had their first sip. Kids who are brought up under tight control are usually the first to rebel in many ways, and of that, there is a significant amount of supporting research.

Pamela - posted on 07/10/2012

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Generally speaking alcohol is a Spirit poison and so consider it that when it comes to children. Though I drink beer, and did so when my children were little, I never offered it to them.



In my humble opinion, that is a choice that should be left to the child when they reach legal age.

Kkrjrpleggett - posted on 07/10/2012

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Absolutely NOT!!!!!! They are BABIES!!! That means COMPLETELY Dependent on their care takers to Take CARE of them!!!! They are NOT capable of doing what is best for their little bodies, it our responsibility to make those decisions for them! I would NEVER allow my son to taste alcohol at this age! He gets sips of my drink when I am drinking Milk for Water! He does not even get soda! His body is NOT able to process those types of sugars, let alone ones from alcohol! Not to mention the fact that any affect alcohol has on an Adult is greatly Intensified in a CHILD! WRONG WRONG WRONG! A "mother" is 1000% WRONG if she allows her child to taste alcohol at such a young age!!!!! I am usually not this passionate on here about my personal beliefs, but this is disturbing to me that ANYONE would think it is OKAY to give Alcohol in Any amount to a young child!

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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I strongly suggest that all of you in support of giving children sips of alcohol, with this foolish idea that "it isn't harmful" and "denying it will make them crave it more" need to go to a few AA meetings or other 12 step program & find out how alcoholism starts - you'd be surprised how many people came from good homes where moderation & responsibility towards alcohol consumption was taught. This was true for me and many others - one sip as a child was all it took to get hooked. Just one sip.

Will some kids take a sip and hate it &/or be fine with alcohol, only ever drinking in moderation? Sure - but then they'd be fine to wait until they are an adult too - denying them won't lead to binge drinking for them if you explain to them why they need to wait & lead by example that you are a responsible drinker. Well disciplined kids don't try to sneak "forbidden fruit" - that happens when the parents are either inconsistent in setting boundaries (waffling back & forth on decisions all the time) or are unreasonably strict (the "you can't because I said so"mentality)

As I stated before - since you can't know whether or not your children will have a propensity towards alcoholism until after they take that first sip, why take a gamble with your children's lives like that?

Gina - posted on 07/10/2012

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I understand what you are talking about. It's just enough for them to taste. My daughter had her first "taste" / sip of beer when she was 1yrs old. She is 10yrs old now and I still allow her to taste drinks. I made her, her own cocktail to have with the adults I call it "The Angel". It is made of half orange juice and half golden (has to be golden) ginger ale. If you add spiced rum (and it has to be spiced rum) you have my other drink I call "The Fallen Angel". Just remember in some European countries children drink wine with dinner but the water it down some depending on how old the child is.

Liz - posted on 07/10/2012

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While I do agree that a sip is different from a drink, I definitely disagree with letting the kid have sips of her alcohol is just wrong on so many levels. I don't even let my son have soda pop except for when we're eating out or every once in a while for a treat.

Ashley - posted on 07/10/2012

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@Tassia, id hate to say this but you are wrong. In the state of wi you have to be at least 16yrs of age in a bar and as long as your with your parent or spouse who is over the age of 21 you can legally drink n be served. Of course its up to discretion of the bartender but that is the law there. I lived there for 4 yrs and I know at least two friends who moved there after they were married but not yet 21 and were able to drink and I actually have my best friend still living there who is a bartender. You dont believe me look it up.

Johnny - posted on 07/10/2012

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Just keep in mind that this is an international site. The drinking age (if there is a legal one specified) varies greatly from country to country. Where I live the drinking age is actually 19, and in the neighboring jurisdiction it is 18. In Europe 16 is a common legal age for the intake of wine and beers and 18 for hard liquors. Many countries have no legal age for consuming alcholol in private, thus there is nothing forbidden in allowing a child to have wine with dinner.

This is a very cultural thing, and there is simply not a lot of evidence to support the argument that liquor in moderate amounts is harmful. Actually, repeated studies have indicated that moderate drinkers lead the longest, healthiest lives followed by abstainers and then heavy drinkers. Obviously, excessive consumption of alcohol, like anything, can have serious health and life consequences. But introducing young people to alcohol in a measured and responsible manner has not been shown to be detrimental.

I see no need to give young children (under about age 12-ish) any amount of alcohol except in cultural or religious events. I must agree with the poster who pointed out the vast difference between a parent giving a child a sip from their own cup and pouring a drink into a child's own sippy cup. I would agree that it really sends the wrong message. However, if you are a family that does not abstain, introducing your teen to alcohol and the expectations around how drinking can be done responsibly is key. To me any form of "abstinence only" education is generally a path to failure.

Tassia - posted on 07/10/2012

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There is a reason that there is a "legal age for drinking alcohol" As in all states, you must be 21 years of age to consume alcohol or to handle, transport, or sell alcohol in a liquor store. Alcohol should not be consumed by babies, toddler, teenagers and in some cases adults! I don't allow my children to drink from my cup. Children should drink milk one cup of juice and water! Nothing else!

As parents we need to know when to say no. You cannot say yes to everything. Children need limits and boundaries.

Shari - posted on 07/10/2012

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I sipped beer as a kid and don't like the taste. I would say putting it into their cup puts them into a frame of mind of "this is acceptable for you to have."



rather than " this is for Adults so not much and not without my permission."



I will most likely allow my daughter a tiny taste but only if I knew she wouldn't like it. If she thinks of it as nasty she should maintain that opinion until she is capable of understanding the effects and risks.

You don't want to make it taboo so they crave it. and you don't need to do damage to get the point across.

I do think ppl need to see harm in kids having soda often because it is so bad for their bodies they are so likely to like it. soda is terribly addicting.

Heather - posted on 07/10/2012

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absolutely not! my son is 3 and will be 4 this yr and on the rare occasion that me or my husband drink any kind of alcohol we tell our son that it's grown people drink and that he can't have it. we don't even give him a "taste" because i don't want it to hurt him in any way. the only drinks i'll share with him is if i'm drinking soda or water or something that is okay for him to taste or share with me. and i agree that the mom in Arizona deserved to be charged because what she did was seriously wrong and should not have been done at all!!

Lisa - posted on 07/10/2012

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I do not see the harm in a sip of an alcoholic beverage. A "sip" to me would be less than a tablespoon. I am a firm believer in the adage "forbidden fruit tastes the sweetest." I think that if you deny your kids things they will want them even more. I don't drink often and virtually never to excess -especially around my kids. I don't laugh and joke about drinking making it "cooler" than it is. I would like for them to grow up respecting alcohol and what it can do. I like the fact that teens in a lot of Europe can drink before they can get their license. I know for me going to school in Austria and drinking legally at 16, 17 and 18 meant that really the "coolness factor" wore off well before I was in college and even before I had my driver's license.

Consider this: children at a very young age were drinking beer and wine for hundreds of years due to a lack of clean drinking water and in many places beer is still cheaper than water. People left food out all day and didn't get sick with salmonella. They left their turkeys out on the counter to thaw for 2 days before Thanksgiving and didn't get sick. Kids rode bikes without helmets and stayed outside in the dirt and mud all day long, picking up bugs and dead things. We worked hard, played hard and all around lived an active, social, life. Perhaps as a species humans, and human children especially, aren't as breakable as we seem to think nowadays.

Liz - posted on 07/10/2012

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We gave the tiniest sip of weak beer to our daughter once, because we thought she wouldn't like the taste and would stop demanding to try 'daddy's drink'. It backfired, because she said, 'yummy!' and asked for more.

Now we just say, 'No, this is daddy's drink!' or potentially 'mummy's drink' if it's something caffeinated.

I certainly wouldn't plan on giving sips on any kind of regular basis.

Jessy - posted on 07/10/2012

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Wow I'm shocked about the az mom putting it in her baby's sippy cup! No I havent LET my have drinks or tastes but youngest is what we call the "drink snacher" & he once drank half a cup of my Smirnoff. I am not a my much of a drinker so its rear for me to have anything but I carelessly set down & he drank it. I caught him & freaked out, call the Dr...Dr, hubby & brother said he'd be fine wich he was thankfully. I am suprised if kids would like beer or wine though.

Vicky - posted on 07/10/2012

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please do not start something you regret tomorrow.of all tastes in the shops, you feel that something with addictive trait is a sip only?. I have witnessed first hand the destructive effect on lives of people whose parents,uncles etc allowed sips at a tender age. Remember that we are not all made of same constitution.

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