Does any one have a baby with Pectus excavatum( sunken breast bone)?

[deleted account] ( 15 moms have responded )

At my sons 6 weeks check up he told me that my son has a deformed breast bone. He said that it won't cause problems but I was wondering if there is maybe a mild form of it that they can grow out of?

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Wendy - posted on 02/11/2009

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My Dad had that and I inherited it. As a guy its not a big deal. Noone ever said anything to my Dad (or made fun of him). As a girl I was made fun off and had breast size issues. Im way over it now as an adult. Luckily none of my children got this. I never heard of growing out of it. It is how the bone formed.

LISA - posted on 02/11/2009

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My son was diagnosed with this as well and it is hardly noticeable unless he takes deep breaths.  My doctor says its common, esp in boys, nothing to worry about.  They say some grow out of it, but for a boy not as big a deal.

Ametsig - posted on 05/25/2012

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Im not really a mom.... im 15 (and a boy) and I have had pectus exavatum ever sence i was born. He might grow out of it...but i definetly didn't. Right now i need surgery (the NUSS procedure) but it's to expensive

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X - posted on 05/21/2012

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My 1-year old daughter was just diagnosed with pectus by her pediatrician who also diagnosed her weeks after birth with laryngomalacia. I am of course concerned that she will have it for life, but according to my mother, I had a similar dent in my chest as a baby but it went away around my second year of life. I'm hoping for the best with my daughter but I'm sure the laryngomalacia just aggravates the problem and in her case, it might not get better as time goes on.

Katie - posted on 02/17/2009

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My son has this, but its not very bad. The doctor told me some kids grow out it with development and some have it so bad they need surgery to correct it.

[deleted account]

for all of you that have responed, thank you... I have another question for you..has pectus excavatum been a symptom of something else?

[deleted account]

My 15-yr of daughter has this condition. When she was in preschool the dr. diagnosed her. He said it was mostly a cosmetic issue, and that would be the only reason for surgery. He said that she may become selfconsious about it, which she has. But the scars from the surgery we opted out of would have caused the same issue. She and her good friends joke about her 'chest-hole', and it's ability to hold water. One other thing the dr. told us way back, was that it would probably cause her to have great cleavage when she got older, which unfortunately it has. Just what every 15 year old needs,better cleavage.



She still has trouble findong the right swimsuit, but other than that no lasting problems.



Cristi

Michele - posted on 02/12/2009

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I went to school with a guy that had it. There was nothing wrong with him health-wise, but it did not correct itself. He would take his shirt off to go swimming, etc. and he didn't seem embarrassed about it, and I didn't really even think twice about it myself because it was just the way he was.

Trudi - posted on 02/12/2009

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My son who is now 3yrs old was born with this condition and he was diagnosed at an early age,he had follow up appointments at the hospital + x-rays and i was told that as long as he didnt have problems with his breathin he would be ok and not need a operation to correct it,and as he grows up and fills out more it should not be as noticeable.hope this helps..

Marie - posted on 02/12/2009

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Chrystal-



I was born with the same issue (pectus excavatum) and as long as it doesn't interfere with any internal organs then there isn't a problem.  Socially, no one has ever said anything to me about it (even when I wear a bathing suit) and I have never felt different as a result of it.  Unfortunately, it doesn't correct itself.  Unless your son has surgery, that's the way it will be for life.  Chances are, though, that it won't even be an issue. 

[deleted account]

Thank you sarah for sharing that, gives me hope.. I know it is no big deal but it bothers me to know that something is wrong

Rene - posted on 02/11/2009

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my sons father had that and my son was born with it...No big deal...as far as correcting itself, well my ex-husband is now 36 and his didn't go away...

Sarah - posted on 02/11/2009

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 My son may or may not have it--if he does, it's so mild that, at 15 months, his pediatrician says it's too soon to diagnose for sure. She assured me that he might grow out of it.



Pretty ambiguous, I know. I try to parse her answer, and I sort of suspect that what it really means is, if it's not really pectus excavatum, it will eventually stop looking like pectus excavatum.



This isn't an answer for you, I know, but at least it suggests that you should keep searching for information. A quick Google search turned up a page about it from the National Institutes of Health, and since it advises patients to tell their doctors whether the pectus excavatum seems to be getting better, getting worse, or staying the same, that sort of implies that it could in some cases get better.



Good luck.

Jeanne - posted on 02/11/2009

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I don't believe that, to whatever degree this condition, a sunken breast bone, exists, that the child will 'grow out' of it.....i'm not a doctor, but had read up on this because i knew someone with it...it really is sad for boys as they age.  from what i found out, surgical correction is the only answer, but i don't remember the age when this is recommended.  jeanne/fl

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