Does Using GoodNites Enable a Child?

Toni - posted on 09/04/2012 ( 197 moms have responded )

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My 9 year old is a bed wetter. I have taken him to a pediatric urologist and everything is normal. They did say he had a lot of stool impaction (severe constipation) and suggested Ex-Lax and MiraLax for a week to help alleviate pressure on his bladder. This did not help the bed wetting. My big issue is his dad - who feels I am enabling our son to continue his bedwetting by my continued use of goodnites. We are divorced and this only adds to the strain of our relationship. He feels that this is sending mixed messages to our son that dad doesn't use them and mom does and that we should both be on the same page. I would prefer not do laundry every day and have my elder son who shares a top bunk bed wake up to the smell of urine. I don't feel discontinuing the goodnites is going to stop the bedwetting. I feel our son has an immature bladder and is a very heavy sleeper. We've tried the bed wetting alarm, limiting of fluids, getting up in the middle of the night to pee. It just gets very frustrating that this is such a hot topic with my ex-husband. He doesn't agree to disagree , but, keeps jackhammering me to stop the goodnite use. All advice is welcome.

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Angela - posted on 10/02/2012

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Hi Toni. I am a thirty five year old mother of three. my oldest was a bedwetter, it really mortified her to have this problem. She wouldnt have sleepovers or go to slumber parties. The best advice I got was using goodnites. It saved laundry, AND HER PRIDE! She no longer had to tell me she wet the bed. Her doctor said alot of the bedwetting came from stressing about bedwetting. GOOD NEWS, HE WILL OUTGROW IT! About a month before my daughter turned 13, I noticed the trash was lighter, no wet goodnites! She has been dry for FOUR months! Also, don't praise him when he is dry, that sends mixed messages. Don't worry about dad and tell your son that when he starts 'developing into a young man' it WILL stop. Good job mommy! Keep doing what your heart tells you to. Obviously you are divorced from this man for a reason, DO NOT let him control you. You have the right to make responsible decisions for your family without his interference!

Nicole - posted on 10/01/2012

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I haven't posted on here before and I apolgize for recommending a product. (I just saw we aren't supposed to do that) In this case, as many children who wet the bed, it is such a HUGE issue. It can cause unnecessary stress for the child along with self confidence issues. No child needs either of those. Also, the extra laundry can be a burden for the parent or caregiver who takes it out on the child, when they can't help it. I'm truly sorry for plugging a product, but if this were my child, I would want to know something out there that could help.

Nicole - posted on 10/01/2012

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I wouldn't plug a product normally at all, but I had a friend with the same issue and when their child who was 13 took it, they didn't wet at all. It's safe and 100% natural. I don't know of any child that would wet on purpose. It's embarrassing & gross. To answer your question, the goodnights help them feel immature, but keep them more dry and may keep the sheets dry. I would use them for my child. Eliminating the constipation issue could help too. My friend used Miralax every day for 3 months to help soften things then also did a "clean out" but the wetting didn't stop until they tried this. I can get you more info if interested. Email me at cnmajor5@gmail.com.

Candyce - posted on 10/01/2012

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It's absolutely NOT enabling! Seriously, what kid actually wants to wet the bed?? I bet a lot of it has to do with the strain he's catching between his parents, not to blame y'all, just offering a reason. I was about the same age (even a bit older) and often wet whenever I was anxious or stressed out (moving from HI to IN made it worse, and my dad's yelling made it even worse). He will eventually grow out of it, but he doesn't need to be guilt-tripped about it. His dad needs to chill out and start THINKING about why this is happening.

Niki - posted on 09/30/2012

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His bladder will mature when it is ready. Nobody learns how to use the bathroom at night by waking up cold and wet. I have a seven year old girl who still wears goodnights, she is getting better bit by bit. Her father wet the bed till he was 12, so did my brothers. I don't know how to advise you to deal with the ex, a mediator or a counselor? BUT you are correct in waiting this out I believe, so does my pediatrician. You are right that mixed messages will make this harder for your little guy. There is a reason they sell Goodnights in XL sizes...

Katie - posted on 09/29/2012

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I also have a 9 yr old boy bed wetter.it is so frustrating.my husband tries to punish him by taking away his football cards or something else that really upsets him,but he just can't help it. Then my younger one,5,had been almost dry all the time then got worse.he sometimes doesn't have him wear a pull up but who do you think washes all the sheets and smelly Jammie's?!

Amanda - posted on 09/29/2012

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Just a comment - stool impaction and constipation can play a HUGE role in a child's bladder control. Not only does the extra mass press on the child's bladder, but it can affect the bladder's nerves and cause them to send the wrong signals to the child's brain about whether he needs to urinate. It can take months of laxative therapy to get back on track, too, but is worth it for the child's health!



And I agree with everyone that GoodNites are not part of the problem.

Adrianne - posted on 09/24/2012

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I was a bed wetter until I was 11, My cycle started and then the bed wetting just stopped. I slept hard, my parents used the alarm, the limiting of fluids, I saw a therapist etc. I believe that my bladder was just immature and it caught up when it wanted to. I wish they would have had goodnites when I was a kid, it would have made my life much easier. I just learned how to wash my sheets. I believe that you need to go to the dr with your ex so they can just let him know that his bladder will catch up and everything that is going on is completely normal. Just dont be hard on your boy.

Rachel - posted on 09/24/2012

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Hi Toni I agree using goodnites is not enabling your son in anyway it makes your life a lot easier as you say he shares a bed with his brother and making the brother have too sleep in a wet bed is cruel. An immature bladder may be the cause of your sons bedwetting or as the doc says it could be caused by his bladder being squashed due to constipation but another reason could be the fact that you and your ex as he sees it his mum and dad are not together anymore and this is causing him some form of distress and him seeing someone like a councillor or a child psychologist could help him talk about how he feels where he does not feel like he will be judged or punished for what he has dome may help your son and the problem may disappear almost overnight him seeing you and your ex arguing about this could be stressing him out even more hope this is of some help.

Samantha - posted on 09/24/2012

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hi, my advise would be to stop trying. he will become dry in his own time. i went through this with 2 of my 4 children and nothing worked. i was told by a psychologist that my constant trying was putting a higher level of stress on my children because they thought they where disappointing me. they didn't want to wake up wet and were already disappointed with themselves. don't take the dry nights away from him, its his only security for not waking up feeling like he has no control of the situation. ask your ex to talk to a psychologist about it to help him understand how his son is feeling. i hope this helps and i wish you the best of luck.

kind regards, samantha.

Shelly - posted on 09/24/2012

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You might what to consider taking your child to see a chiropractor. Sometimes bed wetting is due to nerve impingement and the message that the bladder is full does not travel to the brain correctly especially during sleep.

Michelle - posted on 09/24/2012

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I have a child that wet until 11 years old. It is frustrating for all involved. We used MiraLax and it did make all the difference in the world. I don't know how long you tried it for but it took us a couple of weeks and I can't say that is what stopped the bed wetting, but it stopped after the MiraLax. Good luck and just don't send the GoodNites to Dad's house. Let Him wash everyday.. : )

Andrea - posted on 09/24/2012

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Ok now that i read this i feel alot better knowing my son who is 6. still at times wets the bed. I think we may have to resortto the goodnights. Just he feels better about it that its a sickness not something he can really control.

Christy - posted on 09/24/2012

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2 of my kids ages 7 and 9 take ddavp prescribed by their Dr that helps them not wet the need at night

Dawn - posted on 09/23/2012

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My daughter was wetting the bed until she was 7. She didnt want to but she is a very deep sleeper. My doctor said not to worry. I did some research and purchased a bedwetting alarm. Some people have issues with this but for us it worked. The alarm gets a little wet and goes off waking the child, and parent, the wetting stops. Take the child to the bathroom. The first few nights were sleepless waiting for the alarm to go off. It went off 2 days in a row. Then for the next few days, nothing. we were amazed. this alarm triggers the childs brain to wake them up if they need to use the bathroom. It was costly to purchase but I would do it again if I had to. We used it for 2 weeks everynight, as long as she was dry, then 2 weeks every other night. We had only one incident since. She is now 11 and dry. She is not shy about it, she understands it wasnt her fault and her body needed help learning when she should wake up. you can email me if you would like to know more. I still have the kit...

Camilla - posted on 09/23/2012

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Hi

My 7.5 year old daughter wets the bed and i haven"t used and diapers on her for several years

I was at my wits end when i went to my doctor who suggested that i try medicine. She takes Tofrinal at night and only has accidents when i forgety to give it to her.



I am also divorsed and i can understand your frustraion at of

not being on the same page as far as parenting is concerned.



My daughter has been diagnosed with ADHD and bed wetting can also be throw into the mix



Good luck

Tracey - posted on 09/22/2012

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My almost 8 year old does wet every few night and we have tried EVERYTHING to help her stop! The pediatrician isn't concerned and said some just do that! She is an extremely heavy sleeper and has been since birth!

For those that say we are enablers, I say, get over yourself and stop judging people! If I didn't have her wear good nights then I would be up every 2-3 nights washing sheets in the middle of the night! We tried it without the overnights and she had 2 weeks of dry nights and then wet every other night!

I had another parent tell me once that my daughter should be sleeping 12 hours a night no matter what! EVERY CHILD OR PERSON IS DIFFERENT! I don't judge people! I wet until I started kindergarten! Please keep your judgmental attitudes and perfect parenting to yourself! NO ONE IS PERFECT otherwise this world would be in more trouble than we are in now!

Karen - posted on 09/21/2012

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I am the mother of 6 children all adults now, I ahave 3 blondes and 3 brunettes , all 3 of the brunettes , wet the bed till about age 11, the docs all said it was normal , they were all deep sleepers , I also ran 2 daycare centers for 10 yrs and many of the children wet the bed till they were about 10 or 11. IT is VERY normal , many kids wet the bed till they are oldre , it will end , wearing briefs will not make it go on longer ....BUT it will make the child feel better that the child is not covered in urine each morning. YOUR husband is wrong ,,the emotional problems from making your child feel bad will cause a problems ,,not using briefs .

Angi - posted on 09/21/2012

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My brother was a bedwetter until his teens. I'm certain it's a physical thing, he absolutely does not "choose" it and no "message" you can give him will make any difference. There were no disposables for that size/age when we were that age, so my brother just had to wake up wet in a wet bed every morning. I'm sure he'd have LOVED having the GoodNites if they'd existed then! The embarrassment is bad enough without also having to deal with the stink and the wet (ugh).



What made things better for him was when he was taught how to change his own bedding and wash everything himself. We had a large family and he also wound up with the laundry room as his bedroom (my parents got creative so we could each have some sort of room of our own), which made things easier on him. He could put everything in the wash and slip into the bathroom to shower without anyone having to know. After that, my parents just asked him how he was doing with it every so often, and otherwise he dealt with it on his own and avoided the near-daily embarrassment until he finally grew out of it.



I guess one good thing is that he learned good hygiene! He was taking daily showers on his own, at an age when a lot of boys resist showering very often, and of course changing his bedding (again, at an age when a lot of kids would happily leave their sheets for months) and doing all his own laundry.



Another thing that helped him was finding a friend who was also a bedwetter. This friend also liked and slept with stuffed animials, as my brother did. It was fantastic! Besides the relief of knowing he wasn't the only one, they could have sleepovers -- like other boys that age were doing -- and neither kid cared who wet the bed, nobody had to be worried or mortified about the other "finding out" or wetting someone else's bed.

Sara - posted on 09/20/2012

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My boyfriends dad would wet the bed when he was that age. Ended up being due to diabetes. Has he been checked for that?

Tristan - posted on 09/18/2012

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Does your ex-husband realize that he is sending the message to your / his son? Does he think that your son enjoys wetting the bed? It's hard enough for your son's self esteem that he is a bed wetter, never mind having a father who is making no attempt to understand.



The bed wetting will stop when it stops. It's not a conscious decision, and if you ask me goodnights allow a child to maintain their dignity. If God forbid your son was a diabetic would your ex suggest that if he just worked hard at he could overcome it?



Keep up your good work, you're fighting the good fight.

Pamela - posted on 09/18/2012

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GENTLY tell your husband that his house is his and yours is yours. If the children are subject to different rules at each other's houses that's just the way it is.



Question: Does your son wet the bed at your ex-husband's house too? If not, then it may be that the tension in your house is thick and you need to address that issue. The tension may be yours or your son's. It could be caused by a number of things for you. For your son it may be that he feels strong pressure from you which translates into fear and bed-wetting. If the doctor did not tell you that your son's bladder is weak, don't use that as an excuse for yourself or him.



If he wets the bed in both houses then realize that you have a right to do things your way and the same for your ex. REFUSE TO BE BULLIED!!! Tell him, "I agree to disagree with you on this issue and that's that. I shall do as I please in my house and you do the same in yours. Case closed!!"



The highest and best to all of you!

Mary - posted on 09/18/2012

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No it does not my sone wet the bed til he was 13 and i too did the same thing, but the one thing i would recommend is puttin a bed liner on his mattress you can get them at a mattress store, that keep from wearing out the matterss.. and always change his goodnites with his weight and they even have some for men on the adult side.. my ex did not agree with me, but i told him what you do at your house is no concern of mines...hope this helps

Diane - posted on 09/18/2012

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No way, goodnights are great and save my sanity. My son is 9 and still wets the bed pretty much every night. We have tried lots of things to no avail. Also spoke to our dr. Who said we could give him medication but opted to wait on that because messing with him chemically seems wrong. The other question on this is sleepovers though. My son wants to go but if he other kids find out they make fun of him. Do you let your child do sleep overs at others houses?

Lisa - posted on 09/18/2012

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P.S. Constipation was a problem with my son, too. He didn't potty train at night until that issue was addresses and taken care of. That was a very long process.

Lisa - posted on 09/18/2012

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Most doctors say there's no need for concern unless he's still wetting the bed at age 10. Goodnights saved my sanity. And did I enable him? Maybe. Eventually, we had him set a date to stop wearing the Goodnights. I waited until I knew he was ready. For a while, I had to just ignore the rude comments about him wearing "diapers." Anyway, so he was old enough to reason with. He loves keeping up with a calendar. It was a big deal & a goal he set HIMSELF. That's what it finally took. All the "normal" advice we were getting was hogwash.

Kiki - posted on 09/18/2012

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I think you need to do what feels right for you...Our 5 year old was soaking pull ups, but was adamant he didn't want to wear the. so we switched to underwear at night (over the summer, when we could hang stuff out) and he's nearly dry. no idea how he did it, but he was able to make that shift. but if he hadn't, we'd still do the dry nights.

(btw, great tip i was give-- i do layers on the bed, so i only have to pull off a sheet and waterproof layer, and not be fumbling with making the bed in the middle of the night. we have three sets of that on the bed, just in case...)



Just a thought...you mention constipation. have you looked at foods? it's not uncommon for problem foods to affect the bladder, and to cause constipation (but your doctor is unlikely to suggest it--i found pediatric allergists are the best are being aware of the connections). gluten often causes bedwetting and constipation. dairy / soy are other triggers.

so doing an exclusion diet might be useful to see if it helps (give about a month to get out of system if you do...).

I'm loving "what's Eating My Child" which really has helped me to figure out food related stuff....

Janey - posted on 09/18/2012

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I knew of another very similar case. The boy had been pressured to potty train too early so he could join a certain day care class. He ended up with many physical and emotional issue and had to receive a lot of medical care including psychiactric care. Not saying your situation is identical. However, I highly recommend the following:



Take your child to a psychiatrist who can help work out any issues that may be related to this. Get that psychiatrist to write a letter stating that the Goodnites are needed to protect the child's health due to nighttime accidents and that withholding them will not stop the accidents but could cause additional psychological and health issues from messy accidents and associated problems. The letter may specify family counseling for both parents and the child to address issues related to the child that may be contributing to the challenges. Emphasise that parents must coordinate their positions and support the child consistently.



It is not unusual for a nine-year-old to occasionally wet the bed. Shaming the child, withholding the Goodnights and thereby creating more distress will only make it worse. While your child may wet the bed more than occasionally and also experience bowel compaction, making it a more challenging situation, you still need to address it with a low key, supportive manner. Your son's father sounds overconfident about his parenting skills and may be helped by receiving counseling from a family counselor, parenting classes, and books. He might have to hear it from a male to accept it because it sounds like he may think you are being "too soft" on your son. Improving his skillset should help you two raise your son throughout his upcoming teenage years.



I wish you all the best. As a teacher and mother of a boy who is now in college, I feel confident that a supportive, low key approach with NO shaming and NO pressure will be most successful. Getting your son's father to family counseling is going to be your biggest challenge, and I wish you all the best.

Sarah - posted on 09/18/2012

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My 8 yr old son still wets the bed. He sleeps really hard, to the point we can pick him like a rag doll and he doesn't wake up. He will grow out of it. Your ex just has to suck it up and deal with it.

Danielle - posted on 09/18/2012

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From experience... I wet the bed until I was in 8th grade. Believe me not by choice. It must have been a subconscious thing though because when I was about to start high school I realized orientation was an overnight event and I would be sleeping in a gymnasium filled with my entire freshman class. At that point I made the decision not to use the pullups anymore. I decided I would just have to pee on myself every night until my brain decided to start waking me up. I don't know if it was the determination or having a wet bed 2 nights in a row but by the 3rd night I wasn't wetting the bed. I had a couple accidents over the following few months but what a relief it was to be done with wetting the bed.

Beth - posted on 09/18/2012

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well, I can tell you from experience that it won't stop the bedwetting. I have 2 still wearing them because they cannot make it through the night without wetting. My oldest was 7 before he stopped, but my 7 year now is still wetting, and I am pretty sure he will for at least a couple more years. He is also a VERY heavy sleeper. If your son didn't share a bed with his brother, I would say let him go without wearing them for a week or so just to shut your ex up, but he does, so you have to do what's best for him. I realize divorced couples can have very complicated relationships, but would he be willing to at least speak with the doctor about it? Does his dad punish him if he wets? That is the worst thing you can do. My brother wet til he was 12, and I believe it was prolonged because my dad didn't understand that it wasn't under his control. He would punish my brother, and of course that just made him more insecure. I believe he wouldn't have wet nearly as long if my dad hadn't been so ignorant on the subject. Good Luck.

Dawn - posted on 09/18/2012

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My son wet the bed until he was 12 or 13, and what we found was that the main trigger was emotional distress. He's in the autistic spectrum, so he doesn't really have the same kinds of emotional reactions and responses that other people do.



The fact that your son is having problems with both kinds of voiding indicates to me that there is a lot of emotional insecurity, probably directly stemming from the divorce and not knowing "which parent is right". Clearly, both you and your ex want to be "right" (and if you could agree, you might still be married), but in this circumstance, I think you both are (and are not).



The use of GoodNites is not a factor in this, but the sense of conflict between you and your ex IS. You might want to consider getting your son into some kid therapy to help learn some different coping skills for these very tough feelings he's having, and perhaps make a serious effort with the ex to agree to at least not disagree anywhere around or near the kids. Neither of you should be saying anything even a little derogatory about the other - especially not in relation to this voiding problem - and all focus should be on letting the kids know that they still have BOTH parents, and you both love them with all your hearts, and that your relationship with your ex has no bearing on your relationship with your kids.



Just my two cents based on my own similar experiences. :-)

Laurie - posted on 09/18/2012

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My daughter is 7 and we tried everything.We took away the pull ups because of friends advice that she would never stop if we didn't take them away but that just ment washing sheets every day. It is easy for people who have never had to deal with to sit back and judge and say you are enabling your son. but they are wrong. We bought some pads that are made by goodnights that have stick on top of the sheet and when it is wet you just peel it off and throw away. Those work well and sometimes we still use the goodnights. When I talked to the doctor he suggested the alarm because he said the medication had side effects. But the alarm woke her up but scared her to death when it went off. So you need to do what works for you and your son.

Dottie - posted on 09/18/2012

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It depends on the case. Some kids are just too lazy to get up until it's too late and some sleep right through it and don't wake up until they are wet. Either way, you end up having to change sheets every night (like I did) and it's not fun! When I was young, I wet the bed until I started having "sleepovers" with my friends and didn't want to face the embarrassment. Same thing happened with my daughter. In any case, they all outgrow it, but in the meantime, let your child sleep comfortably wearing Goodnites!! When he sleeps over dad's house, don't send the pullups and let dad change sheets every night!

Angie - posted on 09/18/2012

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I didn't read all the replies, but has anyone suggested a bedwetting alarm? We got one for our son from thebedwettingstore.com the brand was malem and it worked in three weeks. You have to be super consistent and stick with it but it was a miracle cure for us. And no you are not enabling him. He will wet whether he is in a goodnight or underwear as his body is not giving him the cue to hold it or get up. Good luck. Also the alarm is a little pricey but I sold it for half the cost on Ebay.

Bacara - posted on 09/17/2012

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Here's the main thing, (in my opinion)... Who is deciding the "wearing of the Goodnights?" Is it you or your son? You failed to mention your son's opinion. You obviously did the right thing and have a doctors advice on the situation and are working with medical doctors to get proper treatment (if needed), all medical, social, psychological issues addressed. So, the question is, What does your son want? If he is aware of the matter and fully understands the situation (that he urinates and is unable to wake up to go) and prefers to wear them, that is totally fine. Make sure that he is "responsible", for example, disposes of them properly, notifies you of the need to purchase more, changes sheets if necessary. If you, in any way are "making" him wear them, than not ok. That's something you and your son will have to talk about. As for the other parent? Well, if you and your son are clear on what is expected and agreed upon, and it's a mutual situation, than the other parent (his dad) is going to need to abide by that and encourage his son. The main thing is that your son be 100% involved in the decision, then, both parents need to go along and be encouraging.

My son is 8 years old and still wears Goodnights to bed. I never would have thought that to be possible for "my" child. But, it is what it is. It is no one's business (including my parents who are very opinionated) , except, my son, me, his dr and his father. My son has, according to doctors after numerous tests, "an incredibly small bladder", he also sleeps so deep that he does not wake up for anything, but also has a sleep walking issue.

Be patient with your son, the less pressure about the whole situation the better. It will come with time.

Anna - posted on 09/17/2012

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We went to a bedwetting clinic at AI Dupont Hospital. we too used the goodnites. We were told to put our child in underwear and use the alarm. On bedwettingstore.com. We purchased the alarm, washable pads for the mattress and a book. They said if they read about it it will be in their brain. Also if there was a need to change the bed that the child should do it .No chocolate or caffeine after 6:00 and limit fluids. Try to get as much fluid during the day instead of night. His teacher allowed him to drink water in class. This I think was the key. Before bed the chils does a triple void of their bladder before going to sleep. 1 1/2 hr before bedtime. then another 1/2 hour then at bedtime. It worked within a week. my other child I only use the pads and the triple void and it worked in a few days. Both had sleep apnea due to tonsils and adenoids. Thank god this worked so quickly for us and for them i felt bad and knew they weren't getting a good sleep.

Molly - posted on 09/17/2012

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It's difficult to read the replies on this page because there are so many ads posted! Can these be removed?



ALSO-keep using the Good Nites. Your son will feel better about himself until he grows out of this condition.

Amber - posted on 09/17/2012

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My five year old wears goodnites and in case he falls asleep before we get one on him goodnites now make little disposable pads that stick in place, both are a godsend as far as laundry goes

Kimberly - posted on 09/17/2012

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My child is also a very heavy sleeper and will wet the bed as did I until I was 10! It was because I slept so heavy. The use of Goodnights has nothing to do with it. I use them on my 5 year old.

Michele - posted on 09/17/2012

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Keep using them! 3 of my kids wet, and it was a lot less stressful on me and them to use the goodnites! Btw- he will not be going off to college still wetting!

I found that the more it was an issue wih their father, the more frequently they wet. When I finally left him, my 10 year old stopped immediately.

Good luck and stick to your guns. Your son doesn't enjoy this any more than you!!

Keri - posted on 09/17/2012

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Teaching your child to wash his/her own sheets and wet pajamas isn't used as a punishment. It's to make them part of the process of accepting his/her condition. In addition, teaching them how to handle an accident if staying overnight with a friend. I was fortunate enough that my son's friend's parents were okay with his issue and just worked around it. Teach your child that there's no reason to be ashamed. It's a medical condition that will eventually fix itself.

Dena - posted on 09/17/2012

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My daughter is 10, been wearing them since she was 6. She actually had bladder reconstruction surgery & the bedwetting stopped for a short while. Then she was found to have the same thing - stool compaction. We actually take a stool softner pill - tried the miralax but she would rather swallow a pill! Had to find a non-stimulant stool softner, but what the Goodnights do for her is save her the embarrassment!!! She would have to get me up in the middle of the night to change the sheets (or she would sleep on the floor, poor baby!). And while I didn't always like being woke up to change sheets I tried not to be harsh to her about it! But she didn't like having to admit that she had an accident! So we started using the Goodnights. At first she was hesitant as it so closely resembles a diaper. But then when I told her those were ONLY made in sizes larger than diapers & were JUST for big kids who had this problem she gave it a try. She liked not having to get up in the middle of the night & have me change sheets, as she could continue to sleep in a dry bed - occassionally she would get up & change her "booper" as we called them. But only IF she woke up. She can go to a friends and not worry! Or have friends over & not worry about peeing on them!



As for your ex-husband I have no advice, except that I am sorry you have to battle him over how best to care for your son!!

Cherie - posted on 09/17/2012

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I tried on my own the Pee Alarm. We bought it on the internet. It worked with in 1 week for my at the time 8 y/o. We his little brother who was 6 wanted to try it too i gave it a shot figuring it couldnt hurt and it was 3 days in with no accidents. Worked wonders and gave me more time not doing laundry...lol

Kristin - posted on 09/17/2012

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My 10 year old daughter just recently stopped wetting the bed, and my younger brother was a bed wetter until his early teens. It's a developmental thing, has nothing to do with wearing pullups at night or not, both my daughter and my brother had the same issue. They are both VERY heavy sleepers and didn't wake up when the feeling that they needed to go to the bathroom hit them. The only thing the pullups do it to save you from having to wash sheets every morning. Keep using them and he will eventually grow out of it

Babette - posted on 09/17/2012

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My son is almost 12 and he still has accidents in the day and night time i have tried everything possible. I took him to see his doctor and I got told its due to behavioral issues. Come to find out back in June of this year he has a mental disability and his brain is not fully developed yet and they told me IN time it will end. The only time he don't have accidents during the day is when he is at school and i don't understand why? if anyone has advice for me I would be grateful

Anjeanett - posted on 09/17/2012

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I think you are very insulting. Like a puppy? Seriously? If you haven't experienced this, you don't know what you're talking about. I was one of those kids. I certainly didn't do it on purpose, and definitely did not want the attention. My mom tried everything, but it is a hereditary biological problem. All your attitude will do is add to the problem. I'm not suggesting anyone should be happy about it, but come on!

Ashley - posted on 09/16/2012

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My suggestion is to keep waking him up at night. And if he is wearing a goodnite do they actually feel when they are wet? I dont know. But potty before bed and if you have to, try every two hours like you would a puppy. I kinda have to agree with your ex on this one. And also like pp said, get him to start doing his own laundry so he knows how big of a pain in arse it is.

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