HELP HELP HELP What should my daughter be able to do at 2.5 years?

Shannon - posted on 04/24/2012 ( 15 moms have responded )

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I am so worried right now...my 2.5 year old doesn't know her colors, numbers, or ABC's...i try and try to work with her but she isn't interested at all...Also she is not interested in potty training at all..she will sit on the potty but won't do anything...I am worried that my daughter is falling behind...She is very smart and does many other things...I just don't know...very stressed about this

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WiseOldMom - posted on 04/26/2012

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Time to calm down. From experience, each child is unique. The fact that she is sitting on her potty & not screaming about it, is a very good sign. Eventually, she will take the next step & accidentally pee in her potty. As far as colors & numbers are concerned, she's a little too young to worry about her falling behind. It's your job to just enjoy being able to observe & participate in her activities of learning & exploring this big world. I am a grandmother of 5 boys. Each has learned at their own pace. All of them eventually learned their colors & numbers. All are potty trained :) It's time to chill out & enjoy just how amazing these little characters truly are. So, calm down, take a nature walk with your 2 1/2 year old & point out all the "yellow" flowers:) You're going to be just fine :)

Belinda - posted on 04/25/2012

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I am pretty sure someone else said this but at this age children should be learning through play. Read to her, play with her, introduce her to colors, shapes, even letters and numbers if you really want to, but don't expect her to be able to say them or identify them on her own. Just mention them as you play or as you drive/walk down the street:" Oh look there is a red tractor" for example.



Take your child to the park. or for a walk. Watch as your child points out the ladybugs on the flag down the road, that there are no children in the park today, that there is a building over there with the sound of children's voices pouring out of the open door and she wants to go and explore. Read her Nursery rhymes or really simple poems. Just enjoy what she is doing and where she is at, If she asks you to buy an ice-cream from her pretend with her. Have fun! and stop worrying.

Stifler's - posted on 04/24/2012

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Mine is the same. Not interested at all in learning stuff or toilet training.

[deleted account]

Yeah, I agree with what these other moms have said and the only thing I have to add is....NEVER compare your child to another. That will only lead you down a road of self hatred. Don't do it. I was pregnant at the same time as one of my friends. I had my son, a month later she had her daughter. Her daughter did EVERYTHING before my son, except for walk. And I used to compare constantly. It only served to make me feel inadequite as a parent and like "OMG, is there something wrong with my son?" Now, my son is a thriving 4 year old and equally as smart as any other 4 year old.

Let go. You concentrate on yours, and let others concentrate on theirs.

And, just so you maybe feel better, my 4 year old? JUST potty trained. Just recently. So, follow your daughter's cues and don't push. Pushing only makes it take longer (no matter what your goal is). Best of luck Momma ♥

Alison - posted on 04/24/2012

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All I'm worried about is her mom getting stressed out over nothing. You can tell that she is smart and you see she is constantly learning and progressing. Let things go at her pace and you'll both be fine!

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Stifler's - posted on 04/25/2012

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they're just so busy at this age playing to want to go to the toilet or read a quiet story.

Shannon - posted on 04/25/2012

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Joy thank you soo soo much for replying to my post...you really made me feel so much better...i have a cousin that has a son the same age as my daughter and a nephew and I am always comparing my daughter to them...and it seems like my cousins grandparents are always telling my mother-in-law that he can do this and he can do that and i just feel horrible when my daughter isn't doing that...from now on i will focus on what she CAN do not what she CAN'T :)

Medic - posted on 04/24/2012

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You know like 90% of moms fib a little on what their kids can do. Don't stress it.

Shannon - posted on 04/24/2012

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I really loved how you said that I should let her learn at her own pace...I just hear about things that other kids can do and it stresses me out...thanks again

Shannon - posted on 04/24/2012

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thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my question...it really has helped out alot

Shannon - posted on 04/24/2012

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thanks so much for all of the information...it has really helped me to calm down

Kaitlin - posted on 04/24/2012

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Kids develop at different rates. There are all sorts of things you can do to encourage those skills, but they are not needed at this point. Like, if you have duplos or legos, you can make towers that are all yellow, or all blue, color with crayons and ask for the purple crayon, etc, playdough, you can make it at home if you want and let her pick the color, etc, get magnetic letters for your fridge, those spongey numbers for bath/shower time. Don't worry about 'teaching' her things, just play and talk- like if you have kitchen stuff, or go grocery shopping wih her, ask her to help you find a yellow banana, or a red tomato, that kind of thing. Kids like to helptoo. DOn't worry about her falling behind, it's really early to be reciting tricks ;)

Medic - posted on 04/24/2012

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She is only two.....calm down... everyone has this push for their kids to be "ready" and not "behind" but they are just kids. They do not need academics shoved down their throat.

Just about all two-year-olds like to explore, examine, test, and try to figure out what is happening in the world around them. Day by day, you can watch your child make connections and discover relationships. He will start to demonstrate new abilities — to communicate, to perform, and to exert his independence — all on his own. It is unfortunate (although understandable) that this age is typically referred to as the terrible twos. The reality of being two means standing up for oneself as an individual in no uncertain terms, and is an entirely normal part of development. True, it can be frustrating at times, but try not to let your child's temporary phase of defiance and tantrums overshadow his new achievements and abilities.

MILESTONES
By the age of two, children's different personalities and skills definitely shine through. The following milestones are meant to give you an idea of the average age that children master various milestones, but be aware that most children will not be completely average. They often excel in certain areas while paying little attention to others at any given time. If, however, you are concerned about your child's development, be sure to address your concerns with your child's doctor.

Between the ages of 2 and 3 years, you're likely to see your child:
Talk in sentences. While the typical two-year-old has a vocabulary of 30-50 words and can put two words together, another year of language development usually brings the ability to make three-word sentences and communicate more effectively. Not only do children start to use pronouns such as I, me, you, and we, but they also start to use them to express emotions (in ways other than through tantrums!). And by the time a child is 3 years old, grown-ups should be able to understand at least 75 percent of what he says.

Start to understand rules. The average two-and-a-half-year-old knows when she has broken rules and can even admonish herself by saying, "No, no," or "Bad girl" (though many will still be tempted to continue the behavior!). She may become upset when things aren't as they should be, for example, when clothing is put on wrong. And by the time a child reaches three years, she will be able to evaluate events as good or bad.

Run, jump, and climb. These gross motor skills really improve over the year as a two- year-old's strength and coordination markedly increase. Most 2 1/2-year-olds can jump off the ground with both feet, and by the time children reach their third birthday, they can typically ride a tricycle and balance for several seconds on one foot. Draw and color. While it's uncommon for 3-year-olds to pay attention to coloring in the lines, the period between 2 and 3 is when scribbling generally becomes more deliberate, and children typically learn to draw (and recognize) circles. By age 3, many will be able to identify some colors.

Name and categorize. Two-year-olds commonly learn the names of five or more body parts, and are able to recite their own names (first and last) by the time they reach their third birthday. Sorting objects according to category and understanding descriptive categories like "big" and "little" or "soft" and "hard" are also typical accomplishments at this age.

Dress himself. While two-year-olds are usually able to undress themselves, and even help with the task of getting dressed, a year of practice usually results in a three-year-old's ability to dress himself (with the exception of more complex tasks such as buttoning).

Show an interest in toilet training. This varies greatly from children just under two years of age to well past the third birthday. While trying to force a child to toilet train before he is ready is all but guaranteed to be a losing battle, many two-year-olds start to show interest, and a majority do achieve this milestone at or before 3 years of age. Be sure a potty seat is accessible, that your toddler gets to observe you and others in the family going to the bathroom, and that you teach your child the words he'll need to know in order to describe his own bodily functions. Most of all, consider this a learning experience, not a battle, and don't hesitate to discuss any issues that may arise with your child's doctor.

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