How old is too old for a bottle? What about a pacifier? My only child is 14 months.

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Carla - posted on 04/25/2009

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My twins are 16 mths and still have both their bottles and pa's. Their brother who is 28 mths threw his own bottle away at 18 mths with no encourgaging. He still has his pa though. I rushed my first 3 through with these and all 3 continually are putting things in their mouth. IMO and this is only mine let your child show you the cues. If they show an strong interest in the bottle try just replacing one a day with a c up. Don't rush the weaning. There is a day that you will look back and wish you had those bottle and pa days back.

I am not saying to let your child walk around with a bottle in it's mouth all day but that may be the only security they have. As for the paci, my 28 mth old sucks his almost constantly. My pediatric dentist says that by the age of 3 and a half you SHOULD but not at your decision limit their use. My daughter had her pa until she was 4 and now is 9. She has no dental problems with her teeth, has never had a cavity, and does not have buck teeth. As a matter of fact her teeth are extremely straight.

I hope my opinion helps in your decision. If people criticizes then just shrug it off. You know your child best. This is coming from a Mom of 6,

User - posted on 04/25/2009

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it depends on the child. do not let other people make you fill guilty. Usually around 18 mo. to 2yrs. When your child can get enough milk by cup and as far as pacifier, my daughter had the nanny fairy come. have child help u put all paci's under pillow. Next morning paci's gone and fairy has left a few age approp. gifts. trust yourself.

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Kambria - posted on 08/25/2012

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In a time where life is far more busy than our lives were for our grandmothers we turn to convenience so we can make it thru the day as mothers and bread winners, we expect our children to be nurtured instead with the soft touch and loving bond of being held while breast feeding to pacify their need to snuggle and bond with plastic bottles and ingage with programs on tv. Rather than hold our babies and have that intense bond that is usually created between mother, father, family & child. Why should we care so much about the age they give up such artificial comforts? Because children learn to care and have empathy to others and are greatly affected by the emotions from the bonds they share and love and comfort they receive as children. Kids don't need your substitute of comfort they need more time bonding with good guardians and loving parents who can turn off the tv and give time to their kids. Good kids come from a bond with family that cannot be substituted by allowing them to be nurtured by things you throw in the trash eventually. Time spent with babies and young children is not something you can make up for later in their lives. Take away the bottle & bink and hold your child for comfort and snuggle them until they fall asleep and you will see a huge improvement in your relationship with them, and you will have less disapline problem children later in their lives. This is my personal suggestion to mothers who think that by allowing kids to need these "objects" to give the nurture kids needs will pay for it later when the child does not care about behaving for them.

April - posted on 04/26/2009

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Both of my girls were off of a bottle by 10 months but I breastfed both of them so the only time they were getting a bottle was when I was working. As far as the pacifer, my oldest was 15 months by the time I got rid of it. I started by only allowing her to have it at nap and bedtime and in the car. Then I only let her have it in her crib. it took a while to get her off of it. With my youngest, my pediatrician started telling me at 6 months it was time to get rid of it. She was about 12 months by the time we got rid of it for good. I did what he suggested and took a razor blade and cut a small sliver off of the nipple to where she wasn't getting very good suction. She didn't much care for it after that. He said to cut a small sliver off about every 5 days but I only cut it the one time.

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I got both my son`s off the bottle before they were 1 yr old and gan=ve them sipper cups. My eldest was a thumb sucker and that habit was very hard to brek. He was half way through kindergarten when he stopped. My youngest son had a dummy, and we got him off these when he was 8 mths old. Call me a hard mum, but it was worth it in the long run. Good luck

Dee-Arne - posted on 04/25/2009

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I got my son off the bottle around that age...just gave him a sipper cup which he was fine with.

I also asked my son when about 18 months to put that dirty dummy in the bin and he did...we had a couple of bed nights but didn't take him long to get over it! hope this helps

Whitney - posted on 04/25/2009

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p.s. if you are interested you can go to AVENT.COM and it will show you all their products, we swear by them! Also they sell them at Wegmans, Rite Aide, and I think Walgreens, or I have even found brand new sets on e bay!

Whitney - posted on 04/25/2009

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I think 14 months is a good time to start your child on a cup. AVENT has thease tops that will snap right into the bottle ring like a nippe would only it is a sippy cup type of nipple and it is a firmer plastic. The best part about them is that they still see a bottle and not a huge change to a cup. It truely makes the transition easier. As for the passy the out of sight out of mind thing worked for us. We gave it to her first only at bed time to start wheening her off it, then gave it to her everyother night then eventually not at all and it worked really well for us that way! Hope this helps!!! Good luck!

Kimberly - posted on 04/25/2009

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I remember taking my daughter to her 1 year appt. and the doctor asking if she was off the bottle. I lied and said yes-went home and started getting her off-it was harder on me. She was totally attached to the pacifier-had one in each hand and one in her mouth until almost 3. Again, it was harder on me than her to get rid of them. Ask yourself why you haven't tried. Think I didn't because she was my youngest-knew she'd be my last. It's probably time to start trying...good luck :)

Angela - posted on 04/25/2009

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Australia is the only country in the world where mothers give up nursing their children before they are 5 years old. Wait, that might be 'western countries' not just Australia. It's a societal expectation that 'shames' us into giving up. You do not have to give up nursing until you and your child are ready. Bottles and pacifiers are a personal choice too. Again, it's societal 'shame' that forces us to take them away from our children. If you are concerned about the societal issue then around 2 is the latest they should have a bottle. The pacifier can be up to about 3 and then they can still have it for comfort at night. You can get orthodontic ones if you are concerned about teeth. I had a pacifier until I was 5 and my teeth are fine. 14 months seems a little early to me to be giving them all up, but again, it's more a personal choice than anything. Hope I've helped.

Linda - posted on 04/25/2009

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If human babies are born to nurse for 2.5-5 years, it seems logical to me that using an artificial breastmilk substitute would be best to continue at least that long... ditto: if babies are supposed to suckle that long on a real nipple, obviously it has to be within the range of 'normal' for a baby to use an artificial replacement at least that long, no?



Thing is... people seem to be in a HUGE rush to force little kids to grow up into adults right now (self-soothing is probably the worst instance), but teens are supposed to be 4yos until they're at least 23...



If you (or anyone) starts a war with a child over the comfort items (or foods that are modified to be as close to the food that is ideal for human babies) to 'make them' give up needing them --after encouraging them to use the in place of what they needed-- without replacing them with something else... well, it not only seems rather cruel to me, but deranged.



What is the point of giving a child something to self-soothe with, if the intention is to take it away when it still 'works'?



Regarding the jaw/tooth concerns, I have read the research: the damage is done by not breastfeeding (using the jaw muscles appropriately) in the first place, and no additional damage is done until the child is compulsively (and often secretly... because it's a war) thumb-sucking beyond 7 or 8.

Melissa - posted on 04/25/2009

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I weened both of my daughters from their bottle at 12 months. So, 14 months is the perfect time. The pacifier is a harder issue. They have proven that children have the need to suck for at least the first 2 years. I let both of my kids have their pacifier when they wanted it until they were 2 years old. At 2, if they wanted their pacifier they had to lay down. The pacifier was for bed/nap time only. I weaned them both completely right before they turned 3.

Jaime - posted on 04/25/2009

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I think that every child is different and you have to go according to their needs. If your 14 month old is still very much attached to a bottle and you are looking to wein him or her then why not try one of the sippy cups that resemble a bottle (I think the 'nuby' brand is the closest) to try and make the transition a bit smoother. It might take some time, but each day that you encourage your child to use the sippy cup they will eventually be comfortable with it. Pacifiers are tricky. My Son uses a pacifier and I know the day will come when I have to wein him, but I also had a nephew that used a pacifier and I began weining him off of it by taking it away during his afternoon naps (because he wouldn't sleep without one)... and eventually he stopped needing it altogether. It was difficult at first and very trying at times and I'm sure I'll have my work cut out for me when it comes to my own, but I always go according to the child. I don't think it's bad that your 14 month old still uses a bottle or pacifier, but for the sake of making transitioning into social settings (preschool) easier it might be a good idea to encourage other cup choices.

Karyn - posted on 04/25/2009

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I agree that now would be a good time to try a sippy cup. The first ones we used had a soft "sippy" part so baby could chew a little, too. Be careful offering either bottles or cups too much. My sister and good friend have kids who had extensive dental work on baby teeth! I suggest trying to water down apple juice when offering it!

Delanie - posted on 04/25/2009

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I had my daughter weaned at 15 months, so 14 months is a great time to start.

Amanda - posted on 04/25/2009

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I think 14 months is a good time to start on a cup, go gradualy and it shouldent be to hard on her. as far as soothers I dont know but I do know they make them up to size 24 months but not beyound. Personally I think it is kind of gross to see a 2-4 yr old walking around with a paci in her mouth, plus if they suck on them to often there teeth can come in crooked and they can develope cavities from the teeth always being coated in saliva. my first daughter gave up her soother on her own at 6 months and my second never really liked them.

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