How should I treat impetigo on my one year olds face?

Sarah - posted on 11/30/2011 ( 25 moms have responded )

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My one year old daughter has impetigo above her mouth... How have you gone about treating this? Are antibiotics the usual course of action with this type of thing? Thanks!

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Evelyn - posted on 12/04/2011

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Oral antibiotics are the fastest way to cure impetigo (although the complete course of antibiotics must be taken). My daughter had this under her nose also (which is a common site because the strep & staph germs reside in the nose and when the skin is broken for any reason, the germ from the nose enters the skin and causes impetigo). Do not wait, go to the doctor now.

Lindsey - posted on 12/04/2011

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I had impetigo a lot when I was a child and my children have gotten it a few times as well. There is no need to take her to a doctor, there is really nothing they can do. Keep her skin clean with antibacterial soap and then keep neosporin (or another antibacterial cream) on it. Once it starts to really crust over, you don't have to keep as much neosporin on it. It will take about a week for it to go away.

Amanda - posted on 11/30/2011

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Go to the doctor now. Impetigo is highly catchy and it needs medication (it will be a cream you need to put on the infected area so many times a day). You will be shocked how fast this will spread through your house to any open wound on people. Wash your hands everytime you touch her, and make sure she is washing her hands everytime she touchs her face.



Also keep your daugther at home until it heals up, because she will be spreading it to others in your area.

Nonie - posted on 12/04/2011

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a contagious bacterial skin infection forming pustules and yellow, crusty sores. • This disease is caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes or S. aureus. Impetigo /ɪmpɨˈtaɪɡoʊ/ is a highly contagious bacterial skin infection most common among pre-school children. Causes



It is primarily caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and sometimes by Streptococcus pyogenes.[3] According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, both bullous and nonbullous are primarily caused by Staphylococcus aureus, with Streptococcus also commonly being involved in the nonbullous form."[4]



Transmission

The infection is spread by direct contact with lesions or with nasal carriers. The incubation period is 1–3 days. Dried streptococci in the air are not infectious to intact skin. Scratching may spread the lesions.



Diagnosis



Impetigo generally appears as honey-colored scabs formed from dried serum, and is often found on the arms, legs, or face.[3]



Prevention



Good hygiene practices can help prevent impetigo from spreading. Those who are infected should use soap and water to clean their skin and take baths or showers regularly. Non-infected members of the household should pay special attention to areas of the skin that have been injured, such as cuts, scrapes, insect bites, areas of eczema, and rashes. These areas should be kept clean and covered to prevent infection. In addition, anyone with impetigo should cover the impetigo sores with gauze and tape. All members of the household should wash their hands thoroughly with soap regularly. It is also a good idea for everyone to keep their fingernails cut short to make hand washing more effective. Contact with the infected person and his or her belongings should be avoided, and the infected person should use separate towels for bathing and hand washing. If necessary, paper towels can be used in place of cloth towels for hand drying. The infected person's bed linens, towels, and clothing should be separated from those of other family members, as well. When a person has impetigo, it is common for them to get it a second time in the space of 6–9 months. This usually occurs in people aged 12–16.



Treatment



For generations, the disease was treated with an application of the antiseptic gentian violet.[5] Today, topical or oral antibiotics are usually prescribed. Treatment may involve washing with soap and water and letting the impetigo dry in the air. Mild cases may be treated with bactericidal ointment, such as fusidic acid, mupirocin, chloramphenicol or neosporin, which in some countries may be available over-the-counter. More severe cases require oral antibiotics, such as dicloxacillin, flucloxacillin or erythromycin. Alternatively amoxicillin combined with clavulanate potassium, cephalosporins (1st generation) and many others may also be used as an antibiotic treatment.

Hope this helps......

Iryna - posted on 12/04/2011

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Hi. Antibiotics is the only way to treat it, otherways it will spread, its very contagious.

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25 Comments

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Sarah - posted on 12/05/2011

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thanks ladies! we're all good now... spoke with pediatrician and got the cream and that took care of it.

Jessica - posted on 12/04/2011

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also to those of you whom say you see recurring bouts of it, it is probably not impetigo then. I am an athletic trainer who deals with wrestlers all the time. In addition, I was just at a seminar on skin infections the other night and that was one of the huge things we talked about. Chances are it's not impetigo but more likely herpes. They don't look the same, but similar. Also, you can go out in public, but be careful, as skin to skin contact is what spreads these things. So as long as your child isn't touching their face and then someone else, you should be okay.

Jessica - posted on 12/04/2011

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are you sure it's impetigo? If it is, being that it is a bacterial infection, yes, antibiotics are the only real course of action to clear it up

Lois - posted on 12/03/2011

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it definitely is not a fungal infection. It is caused by staph or strep and needs antibiotic to cure

Suzanne - posted on 12/02/2011

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Use lotrimin. Impetigo is a fungal infection. How so u know that's whY it is?

Dawn - posted on 12/02/2011

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My daughter who to have that alot also when she was little either from the "bink" or from her licking her lips too much. I went to our family physician and she was prescribed some ointment for the impetigo. It worked and the problem went away. The returning of the impetigo also eventually went away. Good luck and my advice would be to see your family physician.

Jeannine - posted on 12/01/2011

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Yes go to Dermotologist for children, my son had it at6 months spread all over and my 4 year old caught it as well cream was a miracle

Rachel - posted on 12/01/2011

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I myself have had reoccuring impetigo since I was little and still to this day. I always use Neosporin. Make sure the infected area is always covered with the neosporin and don't let it get dried out. That's when it's most painfull.

Sarah - posted on 12/01/2011

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@ michelle & Jana, I already got SEVERE strep from my son, who's in nursery school, and then one of us gave it to my daughter... all of us have now been treated, including my husband, so hopefully we are in the clear.... thanks for responding ladies!!

Jana - posted on 12/01/2011

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My son had it and the doctor prescribed an ointment and just keep it clean. I wound up with a SEVERE case of Strep from it.

Michelle - posted on 12/01/2011

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My daughter gets it reoccuring on her chin. It was diagnosed impetigo & treated with antibiotics & cream for several years now. Then last time I took her to see a different doctor who said it was not actually impetigo, but a form of herpes that cannot be treated with antibiotics or the cream. It looks and acts the same. You might want to ask your doctor about it so hopefully you'll get a correct diagnosis.

Amanda - posted on 11/30/2011

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I dont recall if the cream was antibiotic, my kid brought it home from a local park about 10 years ago. What I do recall is that in a days time we were all infected, and my doctor made it very clear we were not to spend time in public until we were all cleared up.

Vickie - posted on 11/30/2011

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my doctors have always prescribed creams and never antibiotics for this.

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