I have an amazing 9 year old, who unfortunetly still wets the bed at night. I have had her tested for reflux and kidney and bladder disease but everything points to her being very healthy. Looking for advise on how to get her out of pullups and stop wetting the bed at night!

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Megan - posted on 01/14/2013

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Hi! I remember so well how frustrating and helpless I felt to help my son stop wetting the bed. He wet every single night until he was 8 years old. He just used pull ups when he was younger. I kept a no big deal attitude. When he reached age 8 the bedwetting began to lower his self esteem. He worried that his friends would find out and he wanted to go to sleepovers. So I talked with him about using a bedwetting alarm and we read the book Prince Bravery and Grace-Attack of the Wet Knights. He wanted to try the alarm. I purchased the malem with alarm and vibration. He slept right through it at first -which is typical of a child who wets at night. Typically the childs brain does not recognize the full bladder signal while sleeping. The alarm trains the brain to react to the full bladder signal. So I would wake him. Sometimes several times in one night. But gradually he began to wake by himself. And in less than three months he went from wet every single night to dry every single night. I found a lot of positive information about bedwetting and alarm use at www.braveryandgrace.com
Good luck and God Bless!


Also, I found the alarms and waterproof mattress pads at this webstore:
http://astore.amazon.com/bravandgrac-20
hope it helps!

Christine - posted on 02/11/2009

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Hi Jennifer, my now 19 yr old daughter wet the bed untill she was 12 like you i checked every medical problem but thank god she was healthy! I don't know if anyone has told u bed wetting is more prevelent in boys but also is an inherited trait my father and 2 brothers were wetters into their teens i had only girls so this one inherited the gene my advise is to limit drinks after supper let her know its not her fault and if possible take her to the bathroom before u go to bed,(saves u some laundry!) but she will grow out of it.

Kim - posted on 02/12/2009

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Like 1 of your other posters I wet the bed into my late teens because I would dream I was already sitting on the toilet.  It may be something that needs to be grown out of.  BTW, I have never had an problem since becoming an adult.

Jennifer - posted on 02/11/2009

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I had that problem also as a youngster, my mother worked for a chriopractor at the time and he told her to bring me in...she took me in, I had an adjustment and never wet the bed again. Sometimes when there is a sub-luxation in the spine, it interferes with the signal that needs to be sent up to the brain---yeah, sounds crazy, but it's better than a Dr. trying all kinds of meds and stuff---you should try that!!

User - posted on 02/10/2009

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I had tried everything with my 7 1/2 year old and nothing worked until I took him to a cranial sacral therapist. After one session, we were pretty much out of pull ups and only had a handful of accidents. I would try to find someone who speicalizes in kids.



I hope that helps!

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Mary - posted on 02/12/2009

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I saw a post recently saying that they took their child off dairy completely and the bedwetting stopped in a couple weeks. its a drastic dietary change but might be worth trying before meds etc! I googled it to see if it was legit and there is research out there supporting this. good luck!

Christie - posted on 02/12/2009

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My daughter was given a medication to help and put on a strict elimination schedule... every two hours. She suffered day and night wetting until she was in Jr. High! The only solution was the routine, in my opinion. The drugs did not help and tasted bad. The best part was making sure to eliminate liquids after 7pm. I have a nephew that underwent surgery to deal with his problem. They still eliminate liquids after 7pm, though. I opt for no surgery and keeping her on a schedule.

Kelly - posted on 02/12/2009

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my son is 11 and still wets the bed from time to time.. he was tested as well for everything but changing sheets twice a night was getting old and no one was sleeping.. ask your doctor about a med called DDAVP. This helped my son more than you will ever know. now he wets the bed about once every 3 months

User - posted on 02/12/2009

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My sister had that problem when she was younger. She was in such a deep sleep and would be dry til just before she got up. It may take a few nights to pinpoint at what time the wetting occurs and then get your child up to the bathroom. My sister wet late into the morning so once she got up, she learned to train her bladder. Good luck.

User - posted on 02/12/2009

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I have every sympathy. My daughter has just turned 9 and has been like that since she was 6. She is constantly on antibiotics as she is prone to urine infections. She is otherwise healthy apart from a immature bladder as they have termed it. Her consultant suggested drinking lots of water in the day so that her bladder fills fully and empties properly. He also said for her to sit on the toilet foe a bit longer to ensure she empties her bladder properly. We were also prescribed a pill called Lyrinel which is supposed to relax the bladder and stop it leaking when it shouldn't.
It may help your daughter to know she is not alone, I know it helps my daughter.
Best of luck anyway.

Windsor - posted on 02/12/2009

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cut out fluids after a certain time; make her go to the bathroom before she goes to sleep; and wake her up at night to go to the bathroom.

Anet - posted on 02/12/2009

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Have you had your child tested psychologically? Sometimes there is a tiny psychological traumer (that doesn't make sense to us), but it really plays on the kids minds. I'd have her assessed and see if that helps at all. Other than that, I'd just wait and see if she stops by herself. Best of luck

Mashelle - posted on 02/12/2009

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hello I am 46 yes old and when i was 9 i had to have surgery on the openings of the tubes that go from the kidneys to the bladder. They were to small. so i wet the bed and sometimes my pants..Also even as a adult my allergies will make me pee alot or tinkle before i can get to the balthroom..(i use alot of pantie liners).. My 5yr old niece has to have a surgery symilar to mine but the doctor is putting a collengen type stuff around the opens and it will grow to form a stronger tube there....the doctor also said this was heritary....

Tenza - posted on 02/12/2009

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Hi Jennifer, my best advice is no liquids, definately no sugar after dinner. Maybe 6 or 7 or so. Make sure she is using the bathroom before bed and right when she wakes. I find it is mostly a confidence issue. Let me know how this works for you. Once she has a couple of nights that are dry introduce a reward program to keep it going..........maybe so many nights dry ..........you go somewhere fun? Good Luck to you.........



ps make sure the Doctor rules out diabetes as frequent urination is a symptom high blood sugar.  

Ruth - posted on 02/12/2009

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Quoting Jennifer:

I have an amazing 9 year old, who unfortunetly still wets the bed at night. I have had her tested for reflux and kidney and bladder disease but everything points to her being very healthy. Looking for advise on how to get her out of pullups and stop wetting the bed at night!




Hi I am a mother of two girls, my comment or advice I would give would be concerning Kidneys and bladder can be due too fears, A naturopathic doctor told me that children often have some unseen fears and it will or can affect bed wetting.  That is what he told me and this doctor was also a medical doctor.  If you want more information I wouldn't mind giving you his workplace and number,



 

Jessica - posted on 02/11/2009

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I want to 2nd the homeopathic remedy idea; they are all natural, inexpensive, can't do any harm, and you find them at well-stocked supermarkets, or at health food stores(just look for a combination remedy that says specifically for bed-wetting).  I am also a craniosacral therapist, and I saw that helped another family as well, which makes sense...we work with the same basic physical structures as a chiropractor; so either type of therapy would work without having to resort to meds.  Best of luck to you and your little girl!!!!

Jessica - posted on 02/11/2009

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I want to 2nd the homeopathic remedy idea; they are all natural, inexpensive, can't do any harm, and you find them at well-stocked supermarkets, or at health food stores(just look for a combination remedy that says specifically for bed-wetting).  I am also a craniosacral therapist, and I saw that helped another family as well, which makes sense...we work with the same basic physical structures as a chiropractor; so either type of therapy would work without having to resort to meds.  Best of luck to you and your little girl!!!!

Hendrika - posted on 02/11/2009

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Research "enuresis" its the medical name for bed-wetting. My 6 yr old still wets the bed, I went to a pediatric urologist last year and he said pretty much it's a waiting game. Your child's bladder needs to grow and learn to hold their urine for 10-12 hours which is a big deal for a little kid. He also said arbitrary waking, "waking them up at night" only teaches them to wake up, it doesn't teach them to stay dry all night. I wet the bed myself till I was 12 and it's totally hereditary. If one parent wet the bed they have 50% chance of wetting the bed, if both parents wet the bed, it's over 80%.



Anyway, hope this helps!

[deleted account]

I agree with Angela, try the chiropractor first.  It could be the nerve and that is so easy to fix, rather then putting her on medications that might play with her hormones and body.

[deleted account]

I agree with Angela, try the chiropractor first.  It could be the nerve and that is so easy to fix, rather then putting her on medications that might play with her hormones and body.

Christine - posted on 02/11/2009

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Hey, I have an amazing 12 yr old who is just ending, knock on wood, a long history of bed wetting, she has been wearing pull up since she was 5, she had her tonsils out and it helped for a while, but she began having accidents again, we just stopped using the pull ups 2 weeks ago, and she has only had one accident since, I think she just grew too comfortable with the pull ups and wasn't listening to her body anymore, she is very happy being out of the pull ups and I just figured if I was washing the bed at least once weekly even with them, then without them couldn't be any worse, she also didn't have anything physical to cause this problem, just a little family history, but  so far it's been a easy transition, good luck,  Christine Cleary

Merilee - posted on 02/11/2009

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I had two kids who wet well past the age that they should have and we bought an underwear alarm.  You clip it on their undies and as soon as any moisture hits the alarm goes off and wakes the child.  Most kids sleep do deep they don't realize that they are wetting.... soon they learn the feeling of deep sleep and the need to use the bathroom.  It worked well for both m y kids and their wet nights were over!

Mary Jane - posted on 02/11/2009

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Have you had her tested for sleep apnea. I recently read and article that linked sleep apnea in children with bed wetting. The sleep apnea causes them to sleep more deeply than other children so that they don't wake up to go to the bathroom. Often the cause is enlarged tonsils or adenoids. They're supposed to be doing research now to test the theory that removing the tonsils or adenoids or both can affect bedwetting.

Beth - posted on 02/11/2009

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Quoting Jennifer:

I have an amazing 9 year old, who unfortunetly still wets the bed at night. I have had her tested for reflux and kidney and bladder disease but everything points to her being very healthy. Looking for advise on how to get her out of pullups and stop wetting the bed at night!




My daughtet had a simular issue. I discovered that (for her) if I did not give her liquids one hour before bed she would stay dry.  This has worked for me. Hope this helps...

Jennifer - posted on 02/11/2009

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Oh my goodness, there are so many lovely moms out there with such great advise.  Thankyou to you all and God bless. 

Melissa - posted on 02/11/2009

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My two daughters 5 & 7 still wet the bed. The are both heavy sleepers and the fact that they take Zyrtec at night for allergies doesn't help them get out of bed to go potty if they need to. We had a doctor tell us to make sure to stop drinking after dinner (6-7pm), make sure that they go to the bathroom before bed and then wake them up and have them walk to the bathroom a couple times a night. When we first began we had to take them about 2 - 2 1/2 hours after bed, then when we went to bed about 11:30-12. Gradually you can start to push it back to right before you go to bed. Occasionally the youngest wets the bed before we get in to take her to the bathroom. But for the most part she has stopped. One other thing that we noticed with the youngest she was using the pullups as a reason NOT to get out of the bed. I would also suggest that even though it is more laundry if the have an accident...don't use pullups. Good luck, hope this helps.

Penny - posted on 02/11/2009

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Quoting Jennifer:

I have an amazing 9 year old, who unfortunetly still wets the bed at night. I have had her tested for reflux and kidney and bladder disease but everything points to her being very healthy. Looking for advise on how to get her out of pullups and stop wetting the bed at night!




hi there,



hope this helps, iv told this 2 so many differnet mums and its worked 4 them..



firslty you have to rule out that your child is not suffering in any way whilst they r awake, school (bullying), home, out playing what ever. something that you wouldn't know about because this came be a major trigger for bed wetting.



 



if everything is good in your childs life than you need to take control of your childs bladder as you would a baby..



for as long as it takes...



1,dont let your child have a drink within 1 hour of going to bed



2,after your child has fallen asleep wait a coulpe of hours then get them up and sit them on the toilet.



3, then before you go to bed do this again.



4, you then need to set an alarm for avery 1 and 1/2 hours through out the night. and get your child up and put them on the toilet.



after the first 2 nights of doing this, increase the night alarm gaps to 2 hours and so on.



you should be able to pinpoint the time in the night they are wetting. but most of all after a few tiring nights, even if its a week, it will be worth it.



love and best wishes



 



 

Sherry - posted on 02/11/2009

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this may sound mean or old fashioned but i had less then 6 months to fully train my child to go to school when she turned 4 yrs. when she was dry during the day i put her in underwear but she still had a pull-up at night for alittle bit. i told my mom and my worker about it and they suggested that i buy a plastic covering for her bed and send her to bed in her underwear like she wears during the day. so i tried it for awhile and since she had no protection like a pull-up from preventing her from wetting her clothes and the bed she would wake up crying but i stuck to it even though i hated it because of all the laundry i had to do but it worked and she has been being completely trained since and it has being 2 years since then and she now gets up at night and go's to the bathroom on her own. you can try it if you like but if you can get used to doing abit more laundry for awhile it might work good luck.

Liz - posted on 02/11/2009

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I did the alarm system with my child and it worked within 2 weeks.  She just needed to train herself to wake up at night.  she would go into such a deep sleep.  The alarm system was simple, she wore what looks like a minipad with a wire attached to an alarm, the first drop of urine would set off a loud noise, she then had to get up go the bathroom clean the pad and replace with new one, the child had to do this themselves.  this totally worked for us.  Hope this helps.

Liz - posted on 02/11/2009

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I did the alarm system with my child and it worked within 2 weeks.  She just needed to train herself to wake up at night.  she would go into such a deep sleep.  The alarm system was simple, she wore what looks like a minipad with a wire attached to an alarm, the first drop of urine would set off a loud noise, she then had to get up go the bathroom clean the pad and replace with new one, the child had to do this themselves.  this totally worked for us.  Hope this helps.

Georgia - posted on 02/11/2009

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Our now 24 yr old son wet the bed until he was 12. He was a heavy sleeper and his body just had to outgrow wetting the bed. It's also in the family - uncle, half/brother, etc. Our solution was to put a plastic liner on the bed under the bedpad, along with yellow sheets. I washed the sheets every AM.We would take him to the bathroom just before we went to bed and he'd always wet first thing in the morning. On overnight trips in a hotel room we would put hand towels in his underwear, cut a hole in each corner of a black plastic bag and then tie and tape it around his waist. He was 120lbs @ 12 yrs old. If pull ups work, you're lucky.... just be patient... We accepted it as who he was, made jokes about it and just waited until it was over...nothing else we could do....Good Luck!

Erin - posted on 02/11/2009

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Try cutting off liquids about three hours before bed time.  Sometimes it's just a growth spurt and the bladder can't keep up.  She'll grow out of it.  The main thing is you've had everything checked out and she seems healthy.  Good luck

Angie - posted on 02/11/2009

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I was told by my doctor that my sons bladder has not caught up to the rest of his body. He used the pull ups until he was ready. We just have to patient. They feel bad enough already.

Mandi - posted on 02/11/2009

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Is she ADD/ ADHD. my son has ADD and the neuro Dr. says bedwetting is associated. Since he has been on Focalin to treat ADD we have not had a problem.

Johan - posted on 02/11/2009

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he will grow out of it,its just 1 of those things. they do,do a bedwettin alarm,and as soon as it feels moisture it gos off waking the child 4 a wee,getting the brain working the same time as the bladder. the only othr thing that we tried is b4 u go bed say midnight take ur son 2 the loo...gettin the same effect.gd luck

Heather - posted on 02/11/2009

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My 9yo has the same problem.  My sister just recently gave me a recipe for an herbal remedy that I am going to try.  However, my daughter has gone through all the testing, too, the VCUG, the cystourethrogram, and the pull-ups actually gave her chronic bladder infections, so we ended up having to quit using them, so we have TONS of laundry to every day.  She did inform me last week though that she was dry for several days in a row, so there may be light at the end of the tunnel.  My daughter also sees the chiropractor which does help too.  My other children I can wake up around 11 at night and have them go to  the bathroom and they normally stay dry.  They are not near as deep of sleepers as their sister though. Thanks.



http://workathomeunited.com/green4life

Becky - posted on 02/11/2009

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Have you tried the alarm? My 6 year old also still wears a pull up at night. Our Dr. told us that he thinks the best treatment is the alarm because it trains the brain to wake up when it feels the urge to go to the bathroom. For us, he said we should wait a little longer; until at least 7 to try. He felt that our child may outgrow it by then or at least he would be mature enough to handle having to wake himself up and go. I know it is so hard, especially for these kids...good luck!

Sarah - posted on 02/11/2009

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unfortunately there may not be a lot you can do, but dont make a fuss if she wets the bed dont even say anything but when she dosent wet the bed give her a lot of praise i had two sons that wet the bed up untill they were forteen and eleven. you can get something from the doctors to spray up the nose but i only used it on holidays. good luck sarah.

Jodi - posted on 02/11/2009

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I had a child that wet the bed occasionally until age 10 and have had friends/clients who's children have had this difficulty up into their teens, the following suggestions have worked every time:

1) don't make it an issue, just deal with it matter of factly, try not to react by getting angry, overly concerned or sympathetic, both reactions can be counter productive. Sometimes bedwetting is linked to emotions, (i.e.subconscious control issues or desires for attention).

2) a few simple life style changes may be in order, #1 -- NO DAIRY PRODUCTS AFTER 5 pm. This is a must try -- milk, icecream, yogurt, etc. are solid-liquids that take about 3 hours to work through the system, so if a child drinks milk before bed, you can expect that three to four hours later you will see the results. #2 -- set a timer about 1/2 hour before bedtime for the last drink of water/clear fluid before bed, (making sure your child is hydrated during the day helps, so that thirst doesn't hit just before bedtime), then remind your child to go to the bathroom, brush teeth etc. before retiring for the night, this routine is a good habit and helps to keep the "bedwetting" from being an obvious issue.

3) Kali Phos Hyland's Biochemic Cell Salts (lactose based tiny tablets that dissolve under the tongue) can be found at most health food stores. Kali Phos is amazing and usually works wonderfully. The child takes four tablet under their tongue before bed every night and the results are usually instantanious! I always put my child in charge of being responsible for remembering to take them, (though gentle reminders are allowed and helpful, but no nagging). The child can take the Kali Phos with their last drink before bedtime.

It seems to help when the child is actively involved in solving their own dilemna.

**if these suggestions don't work, you might have her checked to see if she is producing enough of the hormone that shuts the bladder down during sleep, some children do not produce this and there are Rx nose drops that can be prescribed by a doctor to help.

Good luck, happiness and hopes for fresh linens!

[deleted account]

Both of my girls didn't toilet train until 4 years old.  My oldest, who is 12 now, only stopped wetting the bed about a year ago.  My youngest, 9 now, stopped about a year ago as well.  I also went the route of all the testing and my oldest daughter was on the "little pill".  it worked for her sometimes but not always.  She is a VERY deep sleeper which I think contributed to her nighttime enuresis (bedwetting).  The most important things I learned, by myself and from my doctor is that 1) Don't make a fuss, just change the sheets and pj's. the child is embarrassed enough 2) keep a waterproof mat under the sheet. and 3) She will grow out of it.  As annoying as it is, remember how embarrassed you child must feel when waking up wet.  It WILL get better!  Good luck and God Bless!

Ashley Nicole - posted on 02/10/2009

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I can understand what yourvgoing through my daughter was potty trained by 2 and rarely had an accident and the all the sudden at age 8 she started wetting the bed she was sleeping so heavy she just couldn'tvwake up in time even tried cutting liquids off at 6pm. Then all the sudden last summer when she turned 10 she justed stop doing this but we also went to the doctor and they said she was fine so I hope it gets better it is just really hard to diagnoise why it happens.

Bleesings-

Sarah - posted on 02/10/2009

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Maybe she is scared at night.  try a night light or something.  and try not puting her in a pul-up when you start the night light thing.  she may be using them as a crutch and not getting up b/c she can use them.  I dont have kids that old though so i dont know.  good luck!

Carrie - posted on 02/10/2009

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I haven't read anyone suggesting an award system, which is part of my family's success story.  I have trained my almost 7 year old to stop bed wetting twice now.  She is a rock hard sleeper, as am I.  Both times the same process worked but it took dedication on my part to not give up.   She regressed at age 6 after 3 dry years, but I temporarily left her in bedtime pants for months afterward as we had too much other stress to deal with it.  Anyway, my process was a routine of cutting drinks off right after dinner (1.5 hours before bed), same bed time every night, sit on potty immediately before lights out no matter what, and an awards chart.  10 dry nights (not in a row) and she earned an award of her choice that we pre-agreed on.  At age 3, we all went to Chuckie Cheese.  Age 6, she got to go to Build A Bear workshop.  The first few stickers were hard to win but the final few were a breeze.  We never said anything but encouraging words.  A wet night was merely  "no worries, you're learning, you'll earn it".  Both times the total time elapsed was about 2.5 weeks but she was 100% dry after 10 non-sequential dry nights both times.  I used the same process on my son, and he was much easier to adapt.  He's a much lighter sleeper.  Any shake up in the delicate routine though, and I've learned I need to wake 'em up for potty mid night to ensure dry sheets.

Kimberly - posted on 02/10/2009

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Hi there,



Two of my four sons has had problems with bed wetting.  The doctors were hesitant to do anything until the age of 7 as many children have bed wetting problems up to this time.  When my oldest had the problem at 8, we took him to a urologist who prescribed the DDAVP that someone else mentioned here.  It worked like a miracle for both him and my other son!  They each took it only a few times (small little oral pill) and stayed dry from that point on.  I don't know how it works, but it does.  Ask your doctor.  There's no reason for you or your daughter to agonize through this any longer!  Good luck!

Amy - posted on 02/10/2009

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I had trouble with my oldest and she also passed all the usual physical tests. I found that the more of a big deal i made out of it the worse it got. When I finally treated it as oh well that's okay she increasingly got better. I believe for her it was more emotional than anything else. I would also agree with Alex about the neurologist. I have slight narcolepsy which causes me to sleep deeply so I find myself running to the bathroom at times and I know that this can sometimes be a cause of bedwetting.

Alex - posted on 02/10/2009

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Hi there, everybody talk about their children... We'll I'll talk about myself. I used to occasionally wet the bed till I was about 11. Rather than having a direct medical problem related to bladder, I just slept all too soundly to wake up. I have outgrown the problem, however recently have discovered why I might have had it in the first place: I was diagnozed with a mild epilepsy which has developed from lttle "night seizures", unnoticed in childhood. My faint-like sleep was most probably a side effect and wetting would also be a part of a seizure. So if you want to be sure, visit a neurologist as well.  If only I had this picked up on then, my life could have been so much easier with epilepsy going undiagnozed

Gina - posted on 02/10/2009

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I was a bedwetter myself until about age 7 or 8. my first son wet the bed until he was about the same age, my third son however wet the bed until he was about 10 years old. It was frustrating but he finally just outgrew it. I'm sure you've tried all the usual advice like stopping drinks a few hours befor bed and you've checked to make sure nothing is medically wrong so you might just have to wait it out

Melissa - posted on 02/10/2009

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I knew someone whose child wet the bed and went through all the tests and were found to be healthy also. so the doctor recommended a "stop wetting pill" which was actually a sugar pill and the bedwetting stopped.

Sue - posted on 02/10/2009

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Hi, have you had her blood tested? 



She could be diabetic, not likely but a possibility.



 

Lisa - posted on 02/10/2009

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my son had a bed wetting problem. They diagnosed him with a premature bladder. The treatment was actually and antidepressant that caused the bladder to increase in size. They made him wait until he was 8 years old before prescribing the medicine and with in a month the problem was over and never happened again.

Andrea - posted on 02/10/2009

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Yep, I remember having the same problem at the same age. My mum also used to monitor what I drank before going to bed. She also used to take me to the toilet every couple of hours during the night. I did grow out of it. Well, eccept for when I laugh too hard or sneeze (but thats anther story). All the best. :)

Tamsyn - posted on 02/10/2009

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My Daughter is 6 we purchased a Malem bedwetting alarm that clips onto her underwear and as soon as it get damp it has an alarm that rings and wakes the child. We used it for only 3 weeks and she now wets the bed only once every few weeks which is amazing for a little girl that wet the bed every night. Although it was quite expensive it was well worth it to restore her confindence in herself.

Holly - posted on 02/10/2009

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My eight year old son has a bedwetting problem and his pediatrician ran tests on him and he's also very healthy. He says he will eventually grow out of it depending on whether my husband or I wet the bed as children but we didn't! So we don't know as far as that goes, but he uses a nasal spray called Desmopressin(sp) and it works wonders!!! For 3 months now he's used it and no accidents! Our pediatrician says the spray is very safe and not habit forming so you may want to check it out! :)

Shaina - posted on 02/10/2009

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I've heard about little alarms that they make especially for bed wetters. It's supposed to train them somehow to get up in the middle of the night and use the restroom. I don't know what it's called or anything, but they're supposed to work pretty good. Also, you may want to have her start doing Kegels just in case her pelvic floor muscles are too weak to hold the urine in at night.

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