I would like a home birth after 2 hospital births...advice and experiences welcome.x

Kylie - posted on 10/07/2009 ( 13 moms have responded )

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I am 28 weeks pregnant with my 3rd child,I have had 2 hospital births,the 1st traumatic,hectic,long and stressfull but vaginal,and the second was through induction,I was already experiencing irregular contractions and so only needed the gell and was on my way,i used only tense machine and a little gas and air,not wanting to have another epidural and not feel this birth as i did my 1st.



It was a quick birth of 4 hrs after the 1st being 16,but i still didnt feel it was the all natural,no intervention birth i want.so therefore i am considering a home birth,where my girls can be with me,my husband relaxed and calm at home and myself being able to do wat i like,where i like,when i like,

No packing 18bags,rushing there incase its born quick,just staying where i want to be.



If anyone has the experience of a home birth or knows of any experiences please let me no of them (no scary stories please)

thank you ladies.x x x

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Pamela - posted on 01/28/2011

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I am pregnant with my 2nd child and delivered my first in the hospital. The most traumatizing experience i could have ever imagined. From the lack of attention and support from nurses and my OB if my husband wasn`t there i would have been practically giving birth alone. It was the middle of the night but to me that makes no difference and nurses/Dr.s should be on there toes at whatever time of day.
I am now considering a home birth for my 2nd. I only hesitate because I had complications with my first child after he was born. He was not breathing when he came out and they discovered some abonormalities as they were trying to insert the breathing tube. So, in that case it scares me to be at home but i also don`t want the experience of the hospital to ruin this experience too.
I was the perfect candidate for ahome birth with my first, perfect pregnancy , healthy baby, right on due date however if i had of delivered at home i wouldn`t have the most beautiful little boy with me today. It leaves me with many uncertanties, i don`t want to risk anything going wrong but i also want this to be an amazing experience that i know it should be.

[deleted account]

Go natural, use a midwife, but my recommendation is to deliver at a hospital. Why place yourself and the baby in danger? What if you need an emergency c-section? Don't do it at home.

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Sherri - posted on 01/28/2011

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Just make sure you have a medical professional with you. A OB or a midwife for your safety and the safety of your baby. Also I wouldn't recommend your girls being their but that is me. Seeing you in pain like that is not anything I would ever want my poor kids having to witness.

Anna - posted on 10/10/2009

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Quoting Diana:

Go natural, use a midwife, but my recommendation is to deliver at a hospital. Why place yourself and the baby in danger? What if you need an emergency c-section? Don't do it at home.


Home birth is not for everyone, but it is at least as safe as a hospital birth for a normal, healthy pregnancy and delivery. 



There's a lot of research and biology behind it that the general public is simply not informed of.  In hospitals, they standardize everything about the labor and delivery process so that if you're not progressing "textbook" they push for intervention, drugs, even potentially dangerous and unnecessary c-section, even if you are just fine.  (Don't read me wrong here.  I know there are times when a c-section is absolutely necessary.  My mom and several friends would have died had they not had one.  Trust me that I'm not saying all are unnecessary.  But many are.)  



The body is designed to deliver in a place that is safe, comfortable, and familiar and if you are nervous or uncomfortable or intimidated in a hospital, your body goes into "fight or flight" response and slows blood flow to sexual organs, digestive process, face, etc. and diverts it to your arms and legs.  This can slow or stall labor, especially if you associate hospital birth with negative experience like the original poster. 



Until the first half of the 20th century, nobody gave birth in hospitals.  When they started hospital birth, mortality skyrocketed because of the insane number of germs in hospitals.  Mortality went back down later, not because of hospital births, but because hygiene and general healthy lifestyles improved as people became more aware of germs and nutrition.  Home birth has been and continues to be the standard around the world in most cultures.  Hospitals are where you go when you are sick.  No matter how much sterilizing they do (and they do the best they can), the hospital has all kinds of germs that you don't have antibodies to.  In your home, there are germs but because you live there and are exposed to them all the time, you (and therefore your baby, through your amniotic fluid and breastmilk) have built up antibodies specific to those germs so that they don't make you sick. 



If you need an emergency c-section, the midwife will be paying VERY close attention to your progress and any early warning signs of trouble, so that she can either correct it herself or get you to a hospital in plenty of time.  Unlike a hospital, she will be able to pay close, constant attention to you and your baby rather than only watching monitors to determine problems.  Chances are that she'll be able to spot problems earlier than they would in a hospital.  You are her only job, as opposed to hospital nurses who have to be in and out all the time.  Hospital nurses provide the very best care they are capable of and they really are wonderful, but the nature of the setting is that they have several laboring women at any given time and they can't be with you, paying attention the whole time you labor.  Especially if your hospital, like so many, has had budget cuts lately.  (If you live far away from an emergency room, it might be best to deliver in a hospital). 



Again, be informed.  Ask questions.  Do research.  If you would be afraid having a baby at home, don't do it.  But it is safe with a good midwife, healthy pregnancy, etc.  A good midwife will tell you if you're not an ideal candidate for home birth based on any number of factors.  A healthy, normal pregnancy is not primarily a medical condition, but a hospital (and our culture at large) treats it that way.  It is a natural part of life, home, and family, which your body is designed to handle.  Trust the process.  If you are more comfortable and empowered and relaxed at home (I know I am) and you really want to do a home birth, then at least meet with some midwives and talk about it!  At 28 weeks, there's a lot of preparation you'll have to pack into your 3rd trimester, but I'm sure you can find a midwife willing to take you on this late in the pregnancy.  For anyone else thinking about home birth, most midwives recommend doing all your prenatal care with them from the beginning of the pregnancy, but don't let it stop you if you're thinking about it later in the pregnancy!  Much love to all!

Anna - posted on 10/10/2009

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Quoting Diana:

Go natural, use a midwife, but my recommendation is to deliver at a hospital. Why place yourself and the baby in danger? What if you need an emergency c-section? Don't do it at home.


Home birth is not for everyone, but it is at least as safe as a hospital birth for a normal, healthy pregnancy and delivery. 



There's a lot of research and biology behind it that the general public is simply not informed of.  In hospitals, they standardize everything about the labor and delivery process so that if you're not progressing "textbook" they push for intervention, drugs, even potentially dangerous and unnecessary c-section, even if you are just fine.  (Don't read me wrong here.  I know there are times when a c-section is absolutely necessary.  My mom and several friends would have died had they not had one.  Trust me that I'm not saying all are unnecessary.  But many are.)  



The body is designed to deliver in a place that is safe, comfortable, and familiar and if you are nervous or uncomfortable or intimidated in a hospital, your body goes into "fight or flight" response and slows blood flow to sexual organs, digestive process, face, etc. and diverts it to your arms and legs.  This can slow or stall labor, especially if you associate hospital birth with negative experience like the original poster. 



Until the first half of the 20th century, nobody gave birth in hospitals.  When they started hospital birth, mortality skyrocketed because of the insane number of germs in hospitals.  Mortality went back down later, not because of hospital births, but because hygiene and general healthy lifestyles improved as people became more aware of germs and nutrition.  Home birth has been and continues to be the standard around the world in most cultures.  Hospitals are where you go when you are sick.  No matter how much sterilizing they do (and they do the best they can), the hospital has all kinds of germs that you don't have antibodies to.  In your home, there are germs but because you live there and are exposed to them all the time, you (and therefore your baby, through your amniotic fluid and breastmilk) have built up antibodies specific to those germs so that they don't make you sick. 



If you need an emergency c-section, the midwife will be paying VERY close attention to your progress and any early warning signs of trouble, so that she can either correct it herself or get you to a hospital in plenty of time.  Unlike a hospital, she will be able to pay close, constant attention to you and your baby rather than only watching monitors to determine problems.  Chances are that she'll be able to spot problems earlier than they would in a hospital.  You are her only job, as opposed to hospital nurses who have to be in and out all the time.  Hospital nurses provide the very best care they are capable of and they really are wonderful, but the nature of the setting is that they have several laboring women at any given time and they can't be with you, paying attention the whole time you labor.  Especially if your hospital, like so many, has had budget cuts lately.  (If you live far away from an emergency room, it might be best to deliver in a hospital). 



Again, be informed.  Ask questions.  Do research.  If you would be afraid having a baby at home, don't do it.  But it is safe with a good midwife, healthy pregnancy, etc.  A good midwife will tell you if you're not an ideal candidate for home birth based on any number of factors.  A healthy, normal pregnancy is not primarily a medical condition, but a hospital (and our culture at large) treats it that way.  It is a natural part of life, home, and family, which your body is designed to handle.  Trust the process.  If you are more comfortable and empowered and relaxed at home (I know I am) and you really want to do a home birth, then at least meet with some midwives and talk about it!  At 28 weeks, there's a lot of preparation you'll have to pack into your 3rd trimester, but I'm sure you can find a midwife willing to take you on this late in the pregnancy.  For anyone else thinking about home birth, most midwives recommend doing all your prenatal care with them from the beginning of the pregnancy, but don't let it stop you if you're thinking about it later in the pregnancy!  Much love to all!

App+7mnejhu - posted on 10/09/2009

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I had planned for a homebirth with my first and even though I ended up being transferred and eventually ended with an emergency c-section I never regretted it and still think they are wonderful. As someone already mentioned a good, trained midwife will monitor you and will know if there is any signs of needing to go to the hospital. Do you have a hospital that is close in case there would be a need to transfer? You have some great advice from people on here already. Homebirths are wonderful and it was so nice not having to go anywhere and just being in the comfort of your own home. I wish you the best!

Rebecca - posted on 10/09/2009

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I had a wonderful experience giving birth to my son at home and plan to give birth to my daughter at home in the next few weeks... My mother is a certified nurse midwife and i had her there when I delivered my son.It was so special. If you want to have a home birth i say go for it. good luck hope everything goes as you wish.

Anna - posted on 10/09/2009

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Quoting Diana:

Go natural, use a midwife, but my recommendation is to deliver at a hospital. Why place yourself and the baby in danger? What if you need an emergency c-section? Don't do it at home.


Home birth is not for everyone, but it is at least as safe as a hospital birth for a normal, healthy pregnancy and delivery. 



There's a lot of research and biology behind it that the general public is simply not informed of.  In hospitals, they standardize everything about the labor and delivery process so that if you're not progressing "textbook" they push for intervention, drugs, even potentially dangerous and unnecessary c-section, even if you are just fine.  (Don't read me wrong here.  I know there are times when a c-section is absolutely necessary.  My mom and several friends would have died had they not had one.  Trust me that I'm not saying all are unnecessary.  But many are.)  



The body is designed to deliver in a place that is safe, comfortable, and familiar and if you are nervous or uncomfortable or intimidated in a hospital, your body goes into "fight or flight" response and slows blood flow to sexual organs, digestive process, face, etc. and diverts it to your arms and legs.  This can slow or stall labor, especially if you associate hospital birth with negative experience like the original poster. 



Until the first half of the 20th century, nobody gave birth in hospitals.  When they started hospital birth, mortality skyrocketed because of the insane number of germs in hospitals.  Mortality went back down later, not because of hospital births, but because hygiene and general healthy lifestyles improved as people became more aware of germs and nutrition.  Home birth has been and continues to be the standard around the world in most cultures.  Hospitals are where you go when you are sick.  No matter how much sterilizing they do (and they do the best they can), the hospital has all kinds of germs that you don't have antibodies to.  In your home, there are germs but because you live there and are exposed to them all the time, you (and therefore your baby, through your amniotic fluid and breastmilk) have built up antibodies specific to those germs so that they don't make you sick. 



If you need an emergency c-section, the midwife will be paying VERY close attention to your progress and any early warning signs of trouble, so that she can either correct it herself or get you to a hospital in plenty of time.  Unlike a hospital, she will be able to pay close, constant attention to you and your baby rather than only watching monitors to determine problems.  Chances are that she'll be able to spot problems earlier than they would in a hospital.  You are her only job, as opposed to hospital nurses who have to be in and out all the time.  Hospital nurses provide the very best care they are capable of and they really are wonderful, but the nature of the setting is that they have several laboring women at any given time and they can't be with you, paying attention the whole time you labor.  Especially if your hospital, like so many, has had budget cuts lately.  (If you live far away from an emergency room, it might be best to deliver in a hospital). 



Again, be informed.  Ask questions.  Do research.  If you would be afraid having a baby at home, don't do it.  But it is safe with a good midwife, healthy pregnancy, etc.  A good midwife will tell you if you're not an ideal candidate for home birth based on any number of factors.  A healthy, normal pregnancy is not primarily a medical condition, but a hospital (and our culture at large) treats it that way.  It is a natural part of life, home, and family, which your body is designed to handle.  Trust the process.  If you are more comfortable and empowered and relaxed at home (I know I am) and you really want to do a home birth, then at least meet with some midwives and talk about it!  At 28 weeks, there's a lot of preparation you'll have to pack into your 3rd trimester, but I'm sure you can find a midwife willing to take you on this late in the pregnancy.  For anyone else thinking about home birth, most midwives recommend doing all your prenatal care with them from the beginning of the pregnancy, but don't let it stop you if you're thinking about it later in the pregnancy!  Much love to all!

Eve - posted on 10/08/2009

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There is a girl on you tube she had a home birth and had a great experience!! If you need any information i am sure that she would not mind to answer any questions her name is lucy eads and her you tube is xxxjolepolexxx so just look her up and sh did a weekly pregnency log and even s birth log on you tube so watch her videos and ask questions!!

Anna - posted on 10/08/2009

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I was just looking at my post again and thought I should add that homebirth is only a good idea if you're prepared, knowledgeable, and well supported by a very good midwife (and hopefully also a doula) and family and/or friends. You need to understand what is going on and have a plan - not only for how you want your labor and delivery to go, but also for what to do if it doesn't go well. At what point would your midwife send you to the hospital? What is she comfortable handling and what would constitute an emergency (and is your definition the same....what are you comfortable with her handling?)? And even details like who cleans up after? How long do the midwife and doula stay after, and how many times do they come back to check on you? What do they do to check out the baby and make sure she's ok? When do you see a pediatrician? What will she do if there's something wrong with the baby? Does she have any pain relief meds/herbs/techniques that she offers?
Anyway, all that is to say that what I've been learning from my research is to ASK every question I can think of, and really pay attention to the answers. Things that are standard in the hospital can be completely different or not even occur in a homebirth. Likewise, there are things that the midwife considers standard that won't come up at all in a hospital. :)
Hope that helps you think of your own questions! :)

Angie - posted on 10/07/2009

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I wish I could have had home births with my children but I couldn't. My first child and I were both very sick and almost died during and after my first delivery so it wasn't wise for me to take a chance with my daughters. I didn't have any pain meds with any of my children (even when I had a d&c to detach placenta) and I survived, you will too!

Anna - posted on 10/07/2009

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I had my 7 month old in a hospital with Pitocin and epidural and it was fine - wouldn't have done it differently this time, but I do plan/hope to do a homebirth (hopefully waterbirth) next time! I'm not planning to try to get pregnant again until baby girl is between 12-18 months old. :) I love hearing homebirth stories and researching it even though I'm a ways away! Looking forward to watching this thread! :)

Jessica - posted on 10/07/2009

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Hi Kylie,



I had a home birth and it was wonderful. I had attended a few births before this; three in the hospital and one at home (I trained as a doula - birth attendant), and after that home birth there was no question in my mind that that was what I wanted.



My midwife was a certified nurse midwife who had worked in hospitals for many years before starting to do home births. I also had my two best friends there who had completed doula training, and I would highly recommend having a doula if you can. I rented a birthing tub as well, which we set up in the living room, and spent most of my labor there; it really helped with the contractions.



Good luck, and let me know if you have questions for me!

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