infant with chickenpox!!

Christine - posted on 05/26/2013 ( 20 moms have responded )

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I am pretty positive my 6 month old has the chicken pox!! Which is surprising because infants don't usually get it and she was breastfed until just a week ago so getting all the good antibodies and whatnot. Unfortunately its labor day weekend so the doc office wont be open until tuesday. The only symptom she is having is the rash/blisters. They have spread very quickly, the don't seam to bother her but I wonder if anyone knows what i can give her/put on them to prevent itching/infections ect.? Is there anything I can do to prevent even more blisters?

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Lauren - posted on 05/30/2013

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The chicken pox vaccine--since it's been mentioned a lot--doesn't necessarily eliminate the chance of getting chicken pox, but makes it much less severe. My sister had the vaccine and still got chicken pox but a much milder case than when I did when younger.

For my sons, I waited to give the vaccine but ultimately I did because I didn't want them getting full-blown chicken pox as adults when it can be much more severe. If I hear of anyone I know, though, with chicken pox, you can bet I'll expose my kids...get it over with when young.

Advice to help ... oatmeal baths, cool washcloths on the skin and anti-itch ointment. It used to be just the pink version, but now they have clear versions too. I think we layered that on me and my sister. Hope she feels better soon!

Cecilia - posted on 05/30/2013

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I know it does not eliminate the changes of catching the virus. I simply stated that if you don't have the doctor confirm it is in fact chickenpox (which it wasn't in this case) They still require you to get the shot.

I never took my children to the doctor for chicken pox since i figured there was little that the doctor could do for them ( mind you this was 15 years ago when the shot first came out, i didn't even know it existed) Then only to find out they said well we don't have it on record so here is the shot.

Also a child getting it young does not prevent an outbreak as an adult. My father got it when he was 3 months old, he then got it again off of me when i got it. He ended up in the hospital for a month because of it. He was taking care of me because my mother didn't know if she ever had it.

Eryn - posted on 05/30/2013

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My son had it at 4 months old, passed down from his older sister. The only thing you can do is just wait it out. I did take him to the dr but that was because I didn't know what to do and they noted that he had chicken pox so he doesn't get the vaccine at 1 & 5. I think its worse for the mom than it is for the child. My son has a few marks from it but he is now a healthy 3 year old. Good luck!

Christine - posted on 05/28/2013

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Was able to take her in to see the doc today. It's hand foot and mouth disease...should be better in a few days. : D

Elizabeth - posted on 05/28/2013

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If they don't seem to bother her, it's probably not chicken pox. They itch HORRIBLY. My kids have gotten spotty, rash like breakouts a few times and its usually a side effect of another virus. Not saying 100% that's not what it is, but a doc would tell you for sure.

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Aleks - posted on 06/01/2013

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Shingles is the same virus as chicken pox.
You cannot get shingles if you have not had been infected with the chicken pox virus (whether naturally or through vaccination - although I would think it quite rare to get shingles after only being vaccinated, I would assume that the person may not have noticed having chicken pox due to its extremely mild nature because of immunisation, and then years later came down with shingles).

If you have had chicken pox, then you have potential of having it come back again as shingles. One way of lowering your potential of getting shingles is having exposure to kids with chicken pox. (FYI - They are now fearing a bigger growth in outbreak of shingles amongst the adult population in UK, due to the ever increasing rates of children being immunised against chicken pox, hence limiting the adults' exposure to the chicken pox virus and getting their immune system further exposed and naturally re-immunised or given a "booster".)

The chicken pox vaccine is given here (in Australia) at around the 18mth mark.

"...introduction of vaccine in 1995 in the USA (released in 1988 in Japan & Korea..."
"... In Europe most countries do not currently vaccinate against varicella, though the vaccine is gaining wider acceptance. Australia, Canada, and other countries have now adopted recommendations for routine immunization of children and susceptible adults against chickenpox."
Other countries, such as Germany and the United Kingdom, have targeted recommendations for the vaccine, e.g., for susceptible health care workers at risk of varicella exposure. In the UK, varicella antibodies are measured as part of the routine of prenatal care, and by 2005 all National Health Service personnel had determined their immunity and been immunized if they were non-immune and have direct patient contact. Population-based immunization against varicella is not otherwise practiced in the UK. It is feared that there would be a greater number of cases of shingles in adults, until the vaccination was given to the entire population—because adults who have had chickenpox as a child are less likely to have shingles in later life if they have been exposed occasionally to the chickenpox virus (for example by their children). This is because the exposure acts as a booster vaccine.[9]"" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varicella_v...


BTW, once you have had chicken pox, you can get shingles at anytime afterwards. I got shingles at 20 or 21 (and apart from a quite sore lower back and a topical mild rash around that same area, may be even a mild fever, that is all that it was for me. I was able to carry on with my daily life as per normal). The older you are in getting shingles, the worse the virus/illness is felt. I have not heard of a shingles vaccine but then again, its not something that is widely promoted where I live, at the moment.

Lori - posted on 05/30/2013

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When my son was 7 I could have sworn he had chicken pox. He woke up with spots all over his body. It turned out to be an allergic reaction to the antibiotic he was on. So really u can't say exactly what it is until u get it confirmed by a doctor.

Meghan - posted on 05/30/2013

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Have you used sunblock on her? Could be an allergy me and bro would break out in a strange pimpley looking rash. Or it could be heat rash....when my son got it the first time I freaked lol

Cecilia - posted on 05/30/2013

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As far as spelling my name wrong it's okay. Everyone does. The spelling Cecelia is more common.

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 05/30/2013

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Faye, getting vaccinated in no way guarantees against shingles. It's a live vaccine.

Oh, I see I didn't read far enough, and Cecilia beat me to the link...LOL (and I just realized that I keep spelling your name, wrong, Cecilia! I caught it this time, but I apologize for the others!)

Cecilia - posted on 05/30/2013

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The vaccination does not prevent shingles. The vaccine uses a live virus and you can get shingles. Shingles Vaccination prevents shingles...


http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weeklyque...
"Does the chicken pox vaccine (Varivax) prevent shingles?
Not directly, since children who get the chicken pox vaccine, even if they don't ever get chicken pox, can still get shingles. Their risk of developing shingles does seem to be much less than for children who aren't vaccinated with the chicken pox vaccine though."

Edit- mind you the vaccine has been out I think 18 years. Meaning that no child who has gotten the vaccine are at the true age of risk of getting shingles. So to say it prevents it all together wouldn't make much sense since there is no way to prove that just yet. Any age group can get shingles, If getting chicken pox makes the risk of shingles very high, then why aren't all the elderly walking around with it since 80% of them had chicken pox?

Faye - posted on 05/30/2013

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Does anyone realize that if any child does get chicken pox that as an older adult (45+) then the likelyhood of that person getting shingles is VERY HIGH?

My question is WHY would any parent want to expose their child to chicken pox, especially now that the vaccine has been in use for a while? My brother and the kids at my mom's daycare had chicken pox, while I was in 2nd grade and I did not get them even though mom made sure I was exposed.

Both of my kids had them when they were 18 months and 5 years old. When it came time for the doctor's office to confirm for the school that my son had chicken pox instead of the shot, they could not, as there had been a fire in the files room at the doctor's office about 5 years previous (which I did not know about). The school did accept a letter from me and the babysitter as to when he had them. (Her granddaughter had exposed the entire daycare so she was watching the chickenpox kids as well.)

Christina - posted on 05/29/2013

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just fyi, infants can get chicken pox too. i had it as a baby (passed down from my older sister), under 6 months old. it doesn't matter if you are breastfed (as i was at that age), it doesn't prevent it. nowadays they offer a chicken pox vaccine as an infantm with a booster several years later. it's worth looking into. from what i've heard though, your child is better off getting it when she is younger as it won't bother her as much and it can actually be lethal in adults.

Estelle - posted on 05/28/2013

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And you can't miss chickenpox with those little blisters. As long as she doesn't scratch to much it won't scar. But small ones don't itch as much

♫ Shawnn ♪♫♫ - posted on 05/28/2013

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Oatmeal baths are a blessing!

My kiddos had it when they were 4&1...and it was worse for the older in terms of itch. The younger, however, pretty much lived in a tub of oatmeal for a couple of days.

Like Cecelia, I had it when I was 8, and I seem to remember mine being the worst in the family...I had it, and then both brothers came down with it about the time mine was clearing. Momma made me wear mittens and bathe in Caladryl...I was bubble gum pink! I think the oatmeal actually helped my kiddos better than the caladryl, but each one is different!

Good luck either way. Watch for the high fever, and make sure you get a mom's night out when everyone feels better!

Cecilia - posted on 05/26/2013

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The truth is, besides the itching, it isn't that bad on them. They are young and it does very little to their bodies. If the 3 year old does start to scratch, put socks on his hands. This will prevent him from leaving scars.

I got it when I was 8 and it was bad. The illness itself didn't really do much. I ended up with the blisters in my throat somehow and under my eyelids (yea rubbing my eyes when i'm tired did that one) I only have 3 scars from the whole ordeal though.

Christine - posted on 05/26/2013

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Thanks. Wish there was more I could do for her. Luckily I am a SAHM so keeping her away from others while she is contagious isn't a problem. I'm guessing my 3 year old son is getting it too. My daughters blisters/rash started yesterday and today my son came down with a fever so I am expecting the blisters to show up on him in the next day or 2. Poor babies. : (

Cecilia - posted on 05/26/2013

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Oatmeal baths and chamomile lotion(you know the pink stuff for poison ivy) is all you can do. It might be a good thing for her to get it now. If the doctor confirms it is chicken pox it means she will not need to get two shots to prevent it. I didn't know this lil fact and never took my kids in when they got chicken pox and they still required the shot because of it.

Anyone who has not gotten it, or has not been vaccinated should be kept away from her until the blisters go away especially adults.

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