my 10 yr old is starting puberty and has gained weight,is that normal? She's getting very self concious!

Lisa - posted on 04/20/2012 ( 71 moms have responded )

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I don't know how to get her to slim down w/o hurting her feelings! Poor girl weighs almost 90lbs and is very short. She also has pubic hair already and her breasts are budding! Help!

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Crystal - posted on 04/20/2012

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I am going to disagree with most people here. This happened to me and I didn't thin out....I found out many years later that I have polycytic ovariam syndrome. A side effect is weight gain at puberty. If it was my daughter I would inquire and test her. If she has pcos it will save her heartache. Good luck.

Natalie - posted on 04/20/2012

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There's noting wrong with your daughter or her weight gain. The last thing I would do is introduce diet anything. Aspertame and splenda and other artificial sweeteners are totally unrequited and can be harmful. Did you know that Aspertame was originally developed as a neurological anti killer. As long as you are all eating balanced meals and ideally together, your daughter will benefit from your example and will overtime loose her negative self image.

Lori - posted on 04/21/2012

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One way to slow some of it down could be to cut out all processed foods and hormone enriched milk in her diet. My daughter is 12 and because she only eats free range chicken and hormone free milk products and garden fresh veggies or frozen veggies I really believe that is why she is not maturing as fast as some of her friends. Good luck!

A concerned mom

Gabrielle - posted on 04/23/2012

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Girls are supposed to gain weight when they hit puberty and/or are going through a growth spurt. Don't talk to her about losing weight. Instead, focus on their entire family eating healthy and being active. That way, you're not targeting her and you're providing a good environment for everyone in the home. Unfortunately, girls are reaching puberty earlier and earlier. Be honest and open with her. Make sure she understands the changes her body is going through and what they mean. If you haven't already, have The Talk. Make sure she knows she can talk to you about anything and everything.

Kaitlin - posted on 04/20/2012

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I wouldn't try to get her to 'slim down'. Make whole house changes if you must, but it's normal to gain weight during surges of hormones. You can go out hiking as a family on weekends, and make healthy family meals, but I wouldn't address it unless she is actually obese. Talk to her doctor if you are concerned.

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Patricia - posted on 01/06/2013

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I meant to add just keep encouraging her. Tell her how beautiful she is. Throw the scales out of the house!! I should know considering I went thru an eating disorder by the age of 13. She does not need to be reminded of her weight. It is hard when you have thin people around you.

I come from a very obese family and I was always very thin. I saw how my Mom fought with my Sister constantly and now at 49 years old she is the biggest she has ever been.

My Mother also made a big deal about me not eating enough because I was so skinny. It is a two edged sword.

Walk with her and go at a slow pace so she can slowly work herself up. The weight is not going to come off over night, but changing your eating habits and I mean everyone in the family for the better will be good all around.

Just have good alternatives for her and you. Don't bring crap into the house. Only drink water.

Patricia - posted on 01/06/2013

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Well first before anything I would take her to your pediatrician and have them do a checkup to make sure she is well.

Cutting out junky stuff. Giving her more choices on nutritious items. Water only to drink.

I think the doctor can refer you to a nutritionist. They can guide you along that way.

Julie - posted on 11/19/2012

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It is completely normal. I remember going through the same thing at 10 yrs old. Short, overweight, and developing early. Just keep telling her she is beautiful.Go for walks together, encourage activity. Keep healthier food in the house for snack options. Don't tell her to lose weight directly,,children need to worry about being kids. ♥ Jules

Christie - posted on 11/10/2012

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Could you tell her you are gaining weight and ask her if she will start walking with you?

Jamie - posted on 11/06/2012

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It's normal for a girl to put on weight my daughter is and her breast are budding. She worrys what other people think. She ways 37.9.

Laura - posted on 05/04/2012

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The best friend will change remarkably over the next 2-3 years, just as your daughter is changing now, remind your daughter that people grow and change at different rates and times. I agree with getting her a great haircut and help her pick out fashionable and fun clothes in her size (just remember "junior" sizing (odd number sizing) is not shaped for curvy girls, but miss petite is (even numbered sizing) and you'll get a similar outfit in a different shape). Remember to compliment her efforts at good grooming and personal presentation as well as her other successes and accomplishments.

Lisa - posted on 05/04/2012

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Thanks Kay! We just started walking together...she just hates exercize,and is out of shape. I never comment on her weight,but she has been saying things,and weighing herself alot,so I know it's bugging her. Plus her best friend is itty bitty.

User - posted on 05/04/2012

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do activity with her, walking , cycling swimming, do not comment!!! , change everyones diet, take her to the beauticians, hairdresser, make her part of a grown up world,

Lynn - posted on 04/23/2012

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My girls are young 2yrs and a 4.5mth. But I have a neice who is going through this. Her parents found a sport she like to do. She likes softball

So softball is what she plays and no one made her do it. She likes to dress and sees that you pay more for clothes and their not that cute. But WOW what a difference already. Her face slimmed down first and she has inspired her mother and myself

We also changed our diets and habits Pics coming soon

[deleted account]

I want to note a few things others may not have mentioned. First, Have they checked her Thyrdoid? If she is gaining abnormally, even after healthy changes have been made, perhaps it is related to a thyroid disorder. Thyroid disorders can cause early or late onset menses. Second, and I know you likely HATE to hear this, but if she is menstruating, she is fertile. If it was my daughter, I would start her on birth control. It could normalize the fluctuations AND prevent pregnancy. There are girls in my friend's daughters' class losing their virginity, she is 12. Lastly, the number 1 way to lose weight without trying is to increase water intake. It sounds so simple, and it is. Buy her a CamelBak or some other similar water bottle. Tell her to fill it every time she empties it. You can stop buying sodas at the house, too, they are a major factor in the nation's obesity issues.

Melissa - posted on 04/23/2012

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I think if you know she's eating healthy food, and not too many snacks and processed food, and is getting enough exercise, she'll thin out once she grows. I also went through a phase like that and grew about a foot in 6th-7th grade. One thing I can warn you about: not making a big deal over her appearance now and not over-praising her once she does begin to thin out. When people started noticing how I had gotten thinner, they all went really overboard complimenting me. This, along with some other circumstances and personality traits I have, resulted in a life-long battle with eating disorders.

Diana - posted on 04/23/2012

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Puberty is a weird time for us gals, isn't it? I went from being an ironing board to being super curvy in just a couple years.(We're talking 36 C, 26, 36 at about 5'2'') For the women in my family, that was not unusual. You could ask your Mom, and sisters, aunts etc. You might find a pattern there. Also, it's good to make sure she's getting plenty of exercise. That helps with the moodiness that can come with all the mad hormone changes, and give her less time to worry about things.
I'm guessing a lot of her friends haven't started developing yet? Yep, that was me too. There was one pretty girl in my gym class that used to make fun of me. She had a really nice slim figure, and was filling out on top too....or so it seemed. All the girls wanted to be like her, until she was jumping after a ball in Basketball ad a big ball of toilet paper fell out of her bra! It was all fake! She was making those of us with 'the real thing' feel bad because she was jealous!
I'd ask your doctor about it if you're worried, but most of all, just give her lots support.
Just had another idea, There are lots of games out there for the various games consoles that are huge fun and give you a real workout. I don't mean the boring exercise ones, but Rock Band, Wii Zumba Wii Fit, and so on. My daughters (4 of them!) get on Rock Band and wear themselves out playing the drums, guitar, and singing and dancing.
If you have a local community center, you might find something there too.
Rounding it up, I think that if she can be busy and do thing that help her feel good about herself, she'll be OK. At 10 she's still got some growing o do. All of mine have grown up for a while, then out, then up again . The one I really thought was going to have problems has turned out to be the slimmest of them all!
All the best to both of you

Corinne - posted on 04/23/2012

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I know a family in our church who are all tall and thin, except for their 10-year old daughter. She is chunky, but in looking at the rest of the family I would not be surprised if she slims out wonderfully once she hits puberty. Some kids just have that happen. If you have made changes to diet, and she is getting plenty of exercise, then she should thin out. I know one friend did that, but her daughter continued to gain - she took her daughter to doctors and everything. Turned out the daughter was sneaking food (that she got from friends) and stashing it away. Make sure she is not doing that.



A couple of years back I saw a photo of a friend's son. My friend is a pediatrician, and his youngest son was chubby and not attractive at all. In the back of my mind I wondered how he as a doctor could let his son look like that. Then I saw a photo just this week of the same boy and I did a double take - he was now a gorgeous teen! He had lost all the puppy fat and looked amazing.

Meg - posted on 04/23/2012

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Talk to her doctor about having her see an endocrinologist. She is entering puberty, so as some others have said here, her hormones will be fluctuating, but there could also be levels out of sync. The proper supplement and/or diet may be able to help realign and stabilize things. If the doctor tries to brush you off with "she'll grow out of it", push him harder to look into it! This is serious - probably not physically, but definitely emotionally. Your daughter is at a very fragile age and, as I'm sure you know, this is when little girls start getting competitive and "catty" with one another. The damage inflicted by her peers could scar her for life. By all means, encourage physical activity and healthy eating, but go deeper and make sure there's nothing else going on.

Stephanie - posted on 04/23/2012

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It's very common for kids to have a "chubby phase" from around 8-12 then they grow and sl down. Just be as healthy as you all can without causing an eating disorder. It's a delicate issue w girls.

Michelle - posted on 04/22/2012

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I don't think a lot of people are addressing what Lisa is trying to say here. It's her daughter that feels badly and uncomfortable about her weight gain, not her mom. I understand complety Lisa, my daughter is 11 and going through the same thing. I just really helped her with cooking healthier meals that were well balanced and taught my daughter about portion control. I packed all her lunches and made sure to give her fresh fruit instead of fattening alternatives like chips, etc. School lunches tend to be really unhealthy (pizza, corn dogs, chicken fingers) and they always offer something like chips or cookies. You will have to stop buying junk food and don't eat foods that she shouldn't be eating, you need to set a good example. I am happy to say my daughter is well on her way to being a comfortable weight and after a few adjustments, she now tells me nothing tastes as good as self confidence. I love her so much and it was killing me to see her so unhappy. It's a little tough at first, and she will put up a struggle when you say no to certain foods, but in the end she will learn a lifelong lesson. She should be eating 1500 calories a day, just so you know. If you need some help with recipes and meal planning, let me know, I will be happy to pass along my kid winning yummy recipes. Also, exercise is important, try bike riding w/ her after school, my daughter really looks forward to doing that. Or let her take up a sport if she's ready.

Jenny - posted on 04/22/2012

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If her weight is bothering her maybe try asking her what she would like to do about it and if she chooses exercising or some such do the exercising with her. Sometimes that helps also I would definitely have to agree that "diet" anything is very harmful but a healthy diet with GREEN veggies and protein is essential for a healthy weight. We Got a family membership at the YMCA and we all love the classes there! Be encouraged, she will be just fine! Glad she has a mama who cares and notices what she's going through!

Carol - posted on 04/22/2012

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See the doctor. Could be precocious puberty which can be slowed, but both my daughter and myself started periods at age 11. Many children "thicken" up just before they hit puberty or in early puberty and then slim back down. My youngest son and both nephews got very pudgy around 5th grade and stayed that way for a couple years. Then it went away fairly quickly. If her breasts are budding that is normal sequence for puberty, my daughter had the pubic hair at age 6 but no budding, she turned out to have a whole different set of problems, so it is good news things are in sequence.

Jackie - posted on 04/22/2012

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My kids just got a trampoline and they love jumping on it - find something she likes to do and get active!!

Jennifer - posted on 04/22/2012

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I know the doctor already checked my son for juvinile diabetes. It can happen to anyone.

Heather - posted on 04/22/2012

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Umm...She is 10, and she weighs 90 lbs. That is perfectly ok. Has nothing to do with her pubic hair growing. Yes, some 10 year old's breasts do bud. Mine did when I was 10, and I started my period inbetween 5th and 6th grade in the summer, and I had to wear a bra. It happens. Maybe cut back a little on what you are feeding her, not by much, just by a little bit, if your that worried. If she is fat or a little overweight, but back on the soda and sugar. That should knock off a few pounds quickly. But her being 10 and almost 90lbs. is fine as long as she's not carrying extra weight. A few extra pounds is fine for a girl her age.



As for the pubic hair, yes, that happens too. Time to go shopping for some training bras or sports bras to help her cover up a little. Sounds like you have a little lady on your hands!

Angel - posted on 04/22/2012

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The very best thing you can do is to model healthy eating and behavior yourself. Ask her to go for walks with you and when you take her out to lunch, order salad. As she grows taller she should slim down. If not, it is important to love and accept her as she is.

Skittlesinsocks - posted on 04/22/2012

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I see all these moms saying don't worry about it, but the fact of the matter is, I started gaining weight when I hit puberty, and I never quit. I am now riding the line between obese and dangerously obese.

Don't let your daughter see you worrying about it, and do your best to reassure her, but at the same time start cutting out processed foods, serving more fresh produce, and push water over any other beverages. Discuss it with her doctor at every visit, but try to do so where your daughter can't hear. The last thing you want to do is give her the impression she is fat- it could drive her over the edge into anorexia.

Cat - posted on 04/22/2012

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VERY, VERY NORMAL!! Step Daughter went through same thing. She was short too. Look liked the bluleberry girl from Willy Wonka. She is 18 now and looks great! Hard thing to deal with were all the comments from family and friends. That was hard on her so you don't want to make it any harder on her. Best thing we did is buy her shirts from the Misses section in petite. Really helped her self esteem. Good Luck

Deanna - posted on 04/22/2012

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This is quite normal during puberty.
There is nothing wrong with it, she still has time to grow taller to even out the weight. She is still going to gain more weight as well. She is too young for any diets right now. Could make her sick if put on a diet.
But, you can have be more active. Going for walks, take her swimming, etc. Help her stay at a healthy weight.

Dominique - posted on 04/22/2012

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Hormone changes can make you gain weight. Don't worry about influencing her body shape, work with your doctor by making sure she is eating nutritious foods and getting daily exercise. People come in all different shapes and sizes, as longs as she is doing healthy activities she should eventually even out with the weight, you never know if she will have a growth spurt and then she may be underweight, things can change so quickly.

Kim - posted on 04/22/2012

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OUr daughter is almost 10 (June 5th) and we are going through the same issues. There are days when her stomach seems to be "puffier" than normal and then it flattens out. She plays soccer and we tried to be more active at home but the other kids at school can be ruthless. We've taken the route of explaining to her that everyones body is different and this is just a stage that she is going through. We've talked to her about how her body needs to have a little extra skin because it's preparing to grow. This has really seemed to help her and has helped fend off some of the other kids comments.

Dawn - posted on 04/22/2012

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I can totally relate to this situation. My daughter spends half the week with me and half the week with her father and grandmother....She is 11 and 5 foot 1 inch and weighs 143 LBS....This was hugely concerning to me and though I had been addressing it with her doctor for several years as her weight was increasing it was finally this year that he gave me a referral to take her to a nutritionist....

In my home I always cook healthy family meals as I have been through weight watcher's myself so I can totally relate to what my daughter is feeling....Unfortunately when my daughter is with her father and grandmother, she is getting a lot of take out(even breakfast at Dunkin donuts....They do not eat REAL food there!!!), etc as nobody cooks in that household and they will not let her cook for herself (even though I have taught her how to...)

So some added tips that the nutritionist gave to me to help my daughter is to make sure to avoid juice and juice boxes as they are high in sugar....instead the child should drink Plenty of water and if plain water is not a favorite for them they can add the little packets of sugar free lemonade or iced tea mix etc. 4C makes them in boxes of 20 and so does crystal light. Also, to use a lower fat milk (Which we already do here but I am trying to work on having her father do there....). Another big thing is to cut down snack portions (She says a snack should be between 100-150 calories if you are watching your child's weight) Such as fruits and veggies or even a pack of Snackwell's that tells you right on the pack 100 calories..... Also make sure that your child gets an adequate amount of fiber daily. (The high fiber granola bars are a great way to help with this....they actually taste good even to kids!!!) And if you have to eat out....most places have nutrition menus with fat and calorie info online now....It is a lot easier to check before hand what is healthy and low calorie as opposed to what is really bad. (Now if I could get my ex and his family to follow that....LOL!) Hope you find some of this helpful!!!! Good luck and best wishes!

Laura - posted on 04/21/2012

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That weight gain along with the pubic hair development are certainly signs of puberty. Consider going 'organic' and local with the majority of your food choices. Fresh is always better and Americans eat way too much meat and dairy anyway. Artificial sweeteners are POISON. Aspartame makes the body insulin resistant making it harder to lose weight successfully.

As a precaution, consider thyroid testing and PCOS evalution; won't hurt, and if either is positive treatment can begin now rather later.

Are you familiar with the TLC network show "What Not To Wear"? They do makeovers on people who dress horribly for a variety of reasons, but as part of the process they address the things these women don't like about themselves then teach them to dress (and embrace) their bodies as they are not what they wish they were.....I can't think of one adolescent who wouldn't benefit by learning these skills.

Terrie - posted on 04/21/2012

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Now is the time to help her slim down. I know this is going to be hard and touchy for her. The best way to do it is to get out and do fun things with her. Let her find a sport that she is interested in and then go with it. Shut TVs and video games off this summer and get out and about. Go swimming and what have you. Get sessons passes to a theme park where there is lots of walking to rides. Also, you can limit her sugar intake without taking it totally away. Have her pcp refer her to a dietition so the dietition can explain to her in a nice manner how her foods need to be portioned out. Usually they are very good at it. Try to substitute fruits for sweets as much as possible. My son is skinny but we do this around our house because I am overweight and my blood pressure just shot up. But they do have dietitions for young people and most of the time they are very good at explaining in a manner that does not hurt their feelings and that makes sense to the child.

Jennifer - posted on 04/21/2012

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She's normal. Her weight will change in time. It also could just be her normal body structure. My daughter is 11 1/2. My son 10 i/2. My second son is 8 1/2. Two are small framed and slight in stature. The other is built like a football player. They love going on group bike rides. We all walk together the long way through town to the park. They see me use my exercise bike and ask to use it.
My daughter is apx 90 lbs. She hit puberty at 10.We changed milk from regular to lactaid when my son was two.Every once in a while we'd have regular milk (non-soy & non-lactaid) and her hormones would go crazy. So we had to go back to lactaid.Soy milk slowed down the process. When we went from lactaid to soy it was for financial reasons when she was 10 1/2.She went off the soy after she turned 11 and the hormones kicked in and resumed where they left off. We had no idea this would happen. We were very surprised it did. Regular milk has hormones in it which will cause younger children to hit it sooner. We have discovered hormone free regular milk and now buy that.
My son is over 100 lbs. The doctor isn't concerned about any of the kids because of their height and build. You would never know by looking at them what their weight is. The older two children have hit puberty. The son over 100 lbs is VERY self-conscious about himself. He controls his portions very well. Loves his veggies. He always asks before he eats or drinks anything. We don't require it. He decided to do it on his own. I am thankful he did and that he is involving us in his choices. He loves to be silly and has tons of energy.
I am thankful for everyone of these children and wish medically speaking I could have more. Our extended family has a wide variety. My dad's sister is 4'9". Our grandfathers are apx 6'. My grandmother was a large woman later in life. Every one is unique and we just have to except how they are made as long as they are making healthy choices. If they are not making healthy choices then we have reason for concern.

Shawn - posted on 04/21/2012

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I have the same issue with my son. His hormones struck early, and he has gained a lot of weight. He was always tall and thick....and now weighty. He is very conscious of it and is constantly pulling on his shirts and such. I have worked hard to keep healthy food for all of us, but he seems to continue to gain. My middle son, who eats basically the same things but hasn't hit the hormones yet, is stick thin. Even more frustrating for my older son.
Hang in there. :)

SARAH - posted on 04/21/2012

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It could be worse, my 10 yr old went through puberty when she was 8 and weighs 163 lbs. She also wears a size 11 women's shoe and wears size 10 in ladies jeans! Hormones are rough on girls and with all the added fructose to our products these girls have no chance without changing their diets and routines and giving them a positive, loving, and accepting environment.

Gloria - posted on 04/21/2012

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My son was always on the thicker side and was getting more so, my husband got him into triathlons and exercise and now he's an athlete and competes...went from a 16 husky at age 11 to now a 12 slim at age 13...find something she loves and help her get into it.

Melanie - posted on 04/21/2012

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leave her alone. It's perfectly normal for a girl to put on a few pounds before growth spurt. she needs it.

Pamela - posted on 04/21/2012

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Encourage outdoor play. Encourage participation in athletics. Put her in a dance class. Swimming is an excellent sport that helps to lose weight because it is a good aerobic exercise.

CUT OUT ALL SWEETS and sugary foods from her diet....no sodas, candy, cake, ice cream, etc. No sugary cereals (no matter what the commercial tells you....frosted any kind of cereal is a negative).

I do not know if puberty is a reason to start gaining weight. Check with your doctor about that. I don't recall that being a problem with any of my children.

Check to see what she is eating at school and friend's houses as well. Maybe she's not getting the sugars at home, but she is probably getting them from somewhere. The American diet is loaded with sugar unless you are particularly aware and conscious of the foods you buy. Read any labels lately? Check the sugar and starch content before you buy!!!

Fluttterby - posted on 04/21/2012

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I would get involved in family activities even something as small as walking after dinner can help. Making it a family activity lets her know it's about the family being healthy together and not just about her being overweight. I would also see if there's any physical activities she's interested in like cheer, dance, soccer etc. where she's getting additional physical activity. Also introduce a healthier diet to the whole family. Cutting small things away that aren't good for us can make a big difference.

Mrs. - posted on 04/21/2012

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I went into puberty when I was 9 and had my period when I was 10. It is harder when the hormones catch up to keep the weight from slipping on a bit. You are moving into your adult body and you might still be eating like kid with a super fast metabolism. This is where you can really help to show her how to make healthy choices and be active.

User - posted on 04/21/2012

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I have a 9 yr old....girls are hitting puberty much earlier than they use to. I wouldnt mention her weight, just help her make good food choices. They put so much hormones in our milk and meat now, this makes our poor babies develope sooner.

Karen - posted on 04/21/2012

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If she keeps gaining weight though and doesn't shoot up have her Thyroid tested. My mom didn't catch on til the time I was about 20. She would constantly tell me I couldn't have certain foods bc I was gaining weight which didn't help bc as soon as I wasn't with her I'd EAT (bc I was hungry). It wasn't caught til after I was married and trying to have children. The lightbulb finally went off when she realized that her mom had a goiter. My children are checked yearly now even my boys are tested since it can happen to them as well.

Lisa - posted on 04/21/2012

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This happened to me as well. I have PCOS, and started puberty early and got chubby. I kept getting told by others (mom, family members) that I would thin out when I shot up. Well, I didn't "shoot up" (uh, no drug pun intended there). As it is, I'm 5 foot 1 and a half inches, now 40 and still struggling with my weight as well as hair loss on my head and hair growth in... other places.



I'm not saying your daughter has this issue. I hope and pray she does not. But I agree that, especially if you or other women in your family have a history of "female" problems, it wouldn't hurt to get her checked out.



Most of all, like everyone is saying here- and it sounds as if you're already doing this- just be there for her as a sounding board and shoulder to cry on, if need be. Good luck!

Jennifer - posted on 04/21/2012

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I wouldn't have her looking at low fat/low salt labels at 10.....might go the wrong way...you don't want her to obsess about lables. Chose some healthy meals and let her pick one for supper....and have her help cook it. Have a let's try something new night a few times a month and I agree with everyone talking about incoroporating exercise in to the day. Make a game of it as often as possible....dance around the house and be silly....laughing is a great exercise too:)

Renae - posted on 04/21/2012

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Activity - not sitting in front of a video game, ipod, ipad,. If it must be video invest in one that the player has to participate. Perhaps mom and daughter could do it together. Great exercise ones and they are fun. Take a walk with her everyday. Take the dog along if you have one. Have her run with the dog. Then start to incorporate healthy meal plans. Perhaps take her to dr for a checkup and cholesterol check along with moms. From there make her a part in choosing healthy meals. She will find something she likes that is good for her. Show her how to look at a label and find out how many calories or salt or cholesterol there is in a product. Fresh vegetables and fruit are always better than canned. Much better than just putting something in front of them and saying, "eat it, it is good for you." If she likes ice cream go to low fat, to no fat. Look on the internet together for a low fat dessert that you can make together as a surprise for dad.

Julie - posted on 04/21/2012

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I went through puberty early(eight) and I wish my mother had started me on a life change(not diet) healthy food and exercise. I spent most of my adult life on the diet roller coaster and I'm just now getting off it at 40! Exercise and eating right will fix a lot even the emotional bits. I just wish my mom could have known that.

Jennifer - posted on 04/21/2012

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Yes it's normal to put on weight when puberty starts. You didn't say how tall she was so how the weight affects her isn't clear. If she is eating healthy and getting an hour of good exercise....riding a bike.....running around outside.....swimming what have you then I wouldn't worry. My daughter is 12, 5'8" and 180lbs. She has a little bit of a belly but she is just big all over....we don't eat fast food except maybe once a month and she is very busy. She is who she is. If you are really worried go over your meal planning.....is she really getting enough fruit and veggies....is she getting way more grain producs than she should and is it whole grain or white bread/pasta/rice. What kind of things does she snack on and really important....what does she drink? A lot of juice has a lot of sugar and lots of calories. Water is best and 2 glasses of 1% or skim milk. Ask your doctor to check her thyroid if her energy level has fallen lately. My daughter has Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and it was her weight gain and energy level that tipped me off. Have a wellness check up and have your doctor talk to her about healthy eating.....it helps. Best of luck!

Carol - posted on 04/21/2012

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AMEN TO THAT YOU CAN'T EVEN TRUST MILK ANY MORE I JUST READ AN ARTICLE THIS MORNING WHERE THEY DILUTE MILK WITH WATER AND ADD JUNK TO IT SO NOBODY NOTICES IT
IT'S REALLY SAID WHAT THE FDA ALLOWS IN THIS COUNTRY
CAN'T WE JUST HAVE THINGS LIKE THEY WERE IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS BEFORE EVERYONE BECAME SO GREEDY!!!!

Carol - posted on 04/21/2012

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SAME THING HAPPENED TO MY DAUGHTER
I WOULD DEFINITELY CONSULT A DR. AND/OR NUTRITIONIST BEFORE THE SITUATION GETS OUT OF CONTROL.
I UNFORTUNATELY DIDN'T DO THAT NOW MY DAUGHTER IS WELL OVER WEIGHT AND IT'S A NEVER ENDING BATTLE :-(
I DO NOT ALLOW JUNK FOOD OR SODA IN MY HOME BUT THEY GET IT ANY WAY :-(
GOOD LUCK

Anna - posted on 04/21/2012

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The one thing I've noticed no one has mentioned is the possibility of hormones in her diet. Unfortunately the industry uses hormones in feeding chickens and cattle for 'fattening up the stock' without consideration for what it does to the people buying the product. If you could keep your daughter's diet high in protein but slow down or even stop meat consumption you will see a difference. Of course there's no promises it will stop her weight increase because like others have pointed out lots of hormones are coursing through her body as it is. The thing is she doesn't need the added hormones from outside sources. Just my two cents, good or bad. Hope it helps and remind her she is a beautiful person and to BE that beautiful person she is, forget what she looks like. I know, easier said than done, but the encouragement needs to remain there strong as possible.

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