My 12 year old son has been diagnosed with Eosinophilic Esophagitis.....

Janet - posted on 01/11/2015 ( no moms have responded yet )

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I've read alot of info about the condition, but I'm not reading about how to cure it completely. We've eliminated dairy on our own, and my son has stopped eating meat from about the age of 8 years old. Feeding him has been a struggle. He eats no solids and liquids is all he's willing to swallow. He's lost weight, and is lacking in color and strength. One positive thing I found, in my search to find something to feed him, other than the powder mixing drink we've been given, was a bone broth that I could make from scratch. This is what I want to share with the rest of you with kids and this condition. Just on the off chance it provides some feeding options for you as well. I found a couple of sites where a recipe is given on how to prepare bone broth. While my son does not eat meat or dairy, a hot soup broth is what he's willing to eat. Basically, the recipe calls for soup bones like beef, chicken, or fish, I would imagine pork or veal would do just as fine. Though I have not made these last two. Nor of fish. Anyway, I purchased organic chicken bones, backs, necks, and I also used a whole small chicken the first time, no hormones or anti-biotics either. I used my large stock pot, cut and pealed 3 large organic carrots, one each of red and yellow large onions, 3 ribs of organic celery, 6 organic garlic gloves, 4 - 6 tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar and cold tap water filling it to the near top. I purposely left out salt, until I served the broth, at which time, I then added it to the soup. I chopped all the veggies into thirds. I let the stock pot boil for about 30 - 60 minutes or so, on high, then turned it down to medium temperature to simmer and cook for the next 4 - 12 hours. What you want to achieve here is the bones to be able to be crushed between your finger when you squeeze a piece and it crumbles. This tells you that all the good stuff from the bones has been released and absorbed into the broth. The longer it cooks the better. The purpose of the Apple Cider Vinegar is to draw out the amino acids, which are the proteins in the meat and bones. My son was in desperate need of protein.

When your soup is ready, scoop out the veggies, double strain your broth through a fine sieve strainer and store the broth in large food grade containers, like plastic. Whatever you have will do. Allow it to cool, and put in your fridge for 3-5 days. I read that you can freeze the broth as well. What's good about this soup broth is all the protein amino acids, except one, exist in chicken broth, (19 amino acids) and (18 amino acids) in beef bone broth. I've also read that it's best to select grass fed beef bones and both hormone and antibiotic free. The beef bones tend to be more acidic than chicken. My son preferred chicken bone broth. You also get the vitamins and minerals from the veggies, and bones. There's fat, and calories from the fat. Believe me, when I tell you this stuff is really tasty. Just don't forget to add salt in everything when you serve it. What you'll get is a yellow colored clear broth that tastes amazing. Heat and serve daily with salt. My son eats 9 bowls a day. I have also puréed the veggies and given them to my son. He's not fond of this idea. In fact he doesn't like solids puréed. I've tried puréed fruits too, to no avail. They seem to bother his esophagus too much, in texture. I don't understand!

The meat from the whole chicken I used in the broth, was used to make lunch and dinner for the rest of us.

My son does not like drinking rice milk, can't have almond milk or soy. So he is very limited to what he can eat. I have found coconut milk and coconut water for simple carbs, he's even eating 2-3 cans of coconut whipped cream for fat and calories. I'm also making jello for him. And, he's even eaten maple syrup by the spoonfuls. He's also drinking juices. Popsicles have been useful in his case. And, taking liquid vitamins. The doctors have suggested a drink called splash and duocal to supplement. Which, we are in the process of getting.

Does anyone know of a recipe for complex carbohydrates that my son might like? It must be liquid. I'm struggling with this one. All I'm getting is these powdered drinks. There's got to be a way of getting some tasty ways of feeding him complex carbs. What are you feeding your kids?

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