My 16 year son is sneaking out!

Lissette - posted on 06/13/2011 ( 141 moms have responded )

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How do you keep your 16 year old from sneaking out at night?

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Carol - posted on 06/16/2011

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We have friends whose daughter was sneaking out so her dad took her bedroom door off the hinges. He said something like, "People who sneak out of the house at night don't need a door on their bedroom."

Jodi - posted on 06/13/2011

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Why is he sneaking out? In order to stop (or understand) any behaviour, you have to understand why they are doing it.

Sharron - posted on 06/17/2011

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Raising children is sooo hard. Mine turned out fine. But I certainly wouldn't have bet on it when they were teens. You talk 'till you're blue and you don't think they are listening. Then you overhere them parrot your words when giving advise to younger siblings or friends. My advise is to explain the house rules, the reasons for the rules, the fact that you are concerned about his safety, tell him that you pray for him daily and do it, do not scream and yell (I know that is hard), Speak to him in a conversational/respectful tone of voice when you communicate (even if he doesn't). You are the adult. Don't let him drag you down to his level by yelling and disrespectful behavior. By modeling good behavior you are sending an unspoken signal that this is the way adults communicate. Let him know that your concern borders on panic when you find him gone because there are so many dangers that could find him. Let him know that he should call you to come get him at any time of day or night when he feels threatened or has been drinking. Insist on responsible behavior in other areas as well. At his age he should have chores that he must do daily and weekly. This is for the betterment of the family. He is a part of your family and should be encouraged (read made) to contribute. Responsible behavior in one area encourages responsable behavior in other areas. Let him know that if he doesn't cooperate with you on this issue, then you will not cooperate with him when it is inconvenient to you. Don't be mean about it. Just stick to it. When Saturday comes and he wants money or a lift to the mall, remind him of the undone chores and reward him only when they are done. He will be loud and angry, but don't loose your cool. You will probably have to repeat your talk in the morning if you discover he is out at night. But your reaction at the time of discovery should be a sincere prayer for his safety and eventual maturity. Then go to bed and go to sleep. You need your rest for the coming day and the battles of will that it surely holds. You can't do an effective job of being a mom if you are a nervous sleep deprived wreck. Like they tell you on an airplane when briefing you on the use of oxygen in case of a crash, you have to take care of yourself first.Only after you have your oxygen mask on are you able to correctly put the mask on a child.

Sindi - posted on 06/20/2011

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My son snuck out of the house ONE time only. These were his consequences: He had to call his basketball coach at 11:30 pm and tell him he would not be able to play in the summer basketball games the following day. Followed by him getting up at 6:00 am and calling ALL of his teammates and explaining to them that he had let them all down by making one bad choice. He had to clean all the gutters out. He had to stack a pick up load of firewood. He had to mow the front and back yard. He had to cut all of the weeds out of the fence with preschool sized scissors. He had to pull all the weeds out of the sidewalks, edge the walk ways. He cleaned the house. Washed the windows. Cleaned out the car. And every time I would give him a new job to do, I would remind him that he had made a bad choice which equalled consequences, he had let his coach and team down and at the end of the day it was over. He has never done it again and hopefully it won't happen again.. One important thing with him was letting his family and team down. It worked. Good luck.

User - posted on 06/19/2011

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I raised 5 kids and only one did this. I was shocked with a late night phone call one night from the police asking if I knew where my daughter was. I thought I did. After inspecting her bed I found out different. Drug tests. Long talks. Nothing seemed to work except the motion detector we put outside her room. She's 21 and grown and not a problem any more.

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Phyllis - posted on 09/20/2014

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Mine will have white paint on him tonight! Found the chair and screen off today. I will be in the shadows waiting

Carol - posted on 10/16/2011

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Finding out "why" is fine, and may be a good idea but it can't become a reason or excuse for what he's doing. He needs to operate within acceptable limits and those limits are what YOU set, not his friend's parents . . . that is unless he gets NO freedom at all, which I doubt is the case.

Ann - posted on 10/16/2011

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You can only keep them from sneaking out by securing the perimeter and taking away assisting devices like cars and phones but communication at this age is key. Find out why and remember if this child is already 16, in less than 2 years He will be able to live on his own and right now a big part of your responsibility is to prepare him for that. I would say consequences for the dishonesty and communication for future occurrences.

Debbie - posted on 10/16/2011

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Are you for sure he's sneeking out? If so, see if it's a particular time & or day. Set a watch by that and he can be caught has he's coming out the window/door. He wants to play with the big boys & is embarrassed of the fact that the other kids can stay out later than him. I bet he's very argumentive when it comes to curfew right. Ask him about how his friends or other kids treat him at school. Does he feel pressured by the others? What's the reason for wanting to stay out late? When my son & daughters were in high school their curfew was 10:30pm wk nights, & 12:00am weekends. If they were late coming in, then the next time they went off they had to be in 30 minutes earlier. The final punishment was they were grounded the whole following weekend.which included the phone too.

Kristin - posted on 10/16/2011

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that what i'm afraid of my daughter just turned 11 i don't think i have to worry about the drugs smoking and drinking because she feels same way i did at her age she can't stand being around people when they smoking and drinking and she has seen affects of both she seen alot of family die from liver and kidney and cancer from that stuff and she always trying to get grandpa and her dad to stop smoking and right before my uncle died she saw what drinking does and she is smart so dont see them being a problem I'm worried about her coming home saying she is pregnant she already talking about sex had that talk with her but they learning about the puberty thing in school and she comes home and acts like it cool to talk about sex what do i do

Kristin - posted on 10/16/2011

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that what i'm afraid of my daughter just turned 11 i don't think i have to worry about the drugs smoking and drinking because she feels same way i did at her age she can't stand being around people when they smoking and drinking and she has seen affects of both she seen alot of family die from liver and kidney and cancer from that stuff and she always trying to get grandpa and her dad to stop smoking and right before my uncle died she saw what drinking does and she is smart so dont see them being a problem I'm worried about her coming home saying she is pregnant she already talking about sex had that talk with her but they learning about the puberty thing in school and she comes home and acts like it cool to talk about sex what do i do

User - posted on 10/15/2011

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In re-reading my post, I don't know if I'd make my child wait a year to start having whatever we took from him, but it would be a good long time before he got to have/use one again. Case in point - our son (my step son) rode his MoPed to work. His dad was out of town and when I was coming home from work at about 10PM I saw him exiting the parkinglot from the the restaurant where he worked AND he was going AWAY from home, not TO home! A few hours later he came home and said he got off late . . . or something like that. I told him what I had seen and when. He still lied. I asked for his keys and he hid them (thus my reference to "hiding them" in my previous post. My neighbor and I carried the MoPed into her garage, but the next morning he waited in the bushes, hair unbrushed, teeth dirty, etc and when she opened the garage door, he ran in and took it. When his dad came home from his business trip we decided to sell the MoPed. He didn't think it was fair but it sure got his attention! The down side . . . I had to start driving him wherever he needed to go, but it was worth it. He matured into a great young man who married a wonderful woman and had the love of our life, our Granddaughter, Taylor. He went into the USAF and had a lifelong career in the USAF. I question whether this would have happened if we had not taken the bull by the horns and done what we did. The follow-through being the crux of the issue.

User - posted on 10/15/2011

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Re: telling him I would take away all his games if he keeps sneaking out - I would not give him warning about what would go. Whatever it is, he'll put it in a safe place where you probably won't find it. If he doesn't stop after a stern warning, I'd just follow through, starting with his games . . . all of them. Don't leave even one! And I wouldn't sell them, I'd give them away (unless you want the money, which is fine). Whatever I did with them, sell them, give them, or eat them, I'd get rid of ALL of them and never tell him where they went - he'll go looking for them or trying to buy them back. (don't underestimate his ability to find money) AND . . . Don't buy him anymore games for a long, long time - until he proves himself. In the meantime, if a game shows up, it goes. If another shows up, it also goes (when he's not there to save an angry encounter, angrier than if you did it in front of him). After he's proven himself, then and only then should he be allowed to start having games again, one at a time and he gives them to you for "safe keeping" when he's not playing them. Proving himself means a year or so of good behavior. There are plenty of other things he can do that the other kids do until then.

LaLasha - posted on 10/15/2011

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you can get door chimes and if you already have an alarm system have them arm the windows also you can put in motion detectors and I would ground him hard core from tv phone internet. if he drives no car that does mean you or your husband will have to drive him to and from sports and if you don't have bus service to and from school. and pile on the house work cleaning from floor the ceiling everyday laundry now is a great time to teach him how to cook and very slowly give him back his privileges I mean so slowly that he will be 18 by the time he gets them all back and then if he doesn't want to live by house rules if he goes to college locally or doesn't then boot him out if he wants to act grown he can be grown in his own home.

Bj - posted on 08/21/2011

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first find out if a female is involved. If so, this is the root of your problem. locking and removing the doors do not work b/c my son tired bedding together and climed out of a two story window. I knew that he was at his girlfriend's house. so, I sent the police to her home. Indeed, he was there and the girlfriend has him to leave once the police was at her home. Her parents were upset, but I did what I felt was necessary. My son was found naked at the girlfriend's dad house at 0300 am and I was not told of this. After repeated times of telling the girlfriend not to call my home after 8pm during the week and 2100 on the weekends, she ignored this. I will continue to send the police to her home when my son leaves the house. He is in violation of curfew. I am sure her parents will not like the police at their home.

Paula - posted on 08/12/2011

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Wow, I can't believe what I am reading! My son had all those things, freedom, my complete trust and he still is sneaking out. The group he is sneaking out with all have restrictions and always grounded. So he steals cars and gets them around at night. I have tried everything and so far nothing has worked. He is now living at his fathers house with no freedom basically being babysat day and night. They are all getting out to party and do drugs and hang with older kids. I have read conversations on his facebook between him and his friends and its disturbing what dangers he is putting himself and his friends in. I have deactivated his facebook and he reactivated it and was on it twice in brief 2 hours his father decided to test and see if he could be responsible. I do not want to wait and see what might happen if he happens to kill himself or someone else recklessly driving without a license.

Carol - posted on 08/04/2011

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The embarrassment of a parent following them or going everywhere they go does tend to get the point across to alot of kids, especially boys. As I recall, at a certain age boys won't usually walk down the street with their mom - usually stay 10 feet behind her.

Carolyn - posted on 08/03/2011

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well, I kind of have a humorous story for this one, my son also was in the habit of sneaking out, I simply stayed awake to catch him, then got on my sneakers, and followed him every and anywhere he went. Eventually the embarrassement was too much and he simply stopped. That was 3 yrs ago, and I'm proud to say he's a homebody now most of the time.

Dianna - posted on 07/28/2011

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Oh boy! Have you got enough input on this yet? It's been the main topic for months now. sorry but gets a bit tedious?

Gemma - posted on 07/28/2011

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just ask him to sit in and talk in one private place..and make upyou mind first what should you talk and expect what might his answer..talk softly and keep ur syes w/ him..

Kathern - posted on 07/25/2011

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nail bells to all the door so you here when they open and or in his room nail his window shut and keep all tools locked up that would work that what my friends parents did to her to keep her in at night and im 17 i no it sounds really mean but really it works......

Kathern - posted on 07/25/2011

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nail bells to all the door so you here when they open and or in his room nail his window shut and keep all tools locked up that would work that what my friends parents did to her to keep her in at night and im 17 i no it sounds really mean but really it works......

User - posted on 07/22/2011

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This was a great post, and I think others have said or at least hinted at it previously. It does sound funny and I believe it would work, at least to make a statement, and a strong one to boot. I like the idea of scaring them to death! (We all know that's not literal, but some kids just need to know that the line is drawn "here" and taking them by surprise can do it). I think that, at last resort, some kids need for their parents to "sit on them," or more appropriately said, to be there all the time to make sure they don't do what they shouldn't, and that they go to school, go to all their classes, don't hang around with the wrong people, etc. Although I realize this leaves no room for kids to learn by mistake, a learning method I firmly believe in, there are times when you just have to shadow them and make sure they're towing the line. I'm referring to the kids who have NOT proven themselves honest and reliable and on top of it, make very poor choices. Those are the kids who will likely get into serious trouble before they reach adulthood. There are some who will resent it now, and some who will carry the resentment on, but those kids probably would hold resentment if you DIDN'T "sit on them." Most kids will thank you for it in the long run and I believe that MOST of the resentful ones will do fine too. And those kids will most likely go on to make GREAT parents, just like their own.

Lee-Ann - posted on 07/22/2011

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Put bells or cans on all the doors and windows. Which should wake you when heard. Or you could sit outside is door or if he's climbing out a window dress up as a werewolf and hide in the bushes, when you see him coming out run up and scare the living crap ou tof him!

Lee-Ann - posted on 07/22/2011

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Put bells or cans on all the doors and windows. Which should wake you when heard. Or you could sit outside is door or if he's climbing out a window dress up as a werewolf and hide in the bushes, when you see him coming out run up and scare the living crap ou tof him!

Mary - posted on 07/18/2011

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Let him know that his sneaking out is not a secret and that you do not go for that kind of thing in your home! Tell him there will be sever punishment if he keeps it up and if he asks like what kind of punishment tell him he will take away his games and sell them!! Or you can follow him to where ever he is sneaking off to and embarrass him so he doesn't do it again.

Shauna - posted on 07/15/2011

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Pray for his safety and plead the blood over him and go to sleep. Teenagers will try your patience and you can be very stressed if you feed into whatever is going on. Pray, pray, pray.

Jessie - posted on 07/14/2011

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My friends would always sneak out when I was a teen. It was usually to go to parties where parents were out of town and just hang out. A few times it was just because others of us worked in restaurants and didn't get off work til 1am and we wanted to hang out. I would be calm and ask him what's going on. Maybe you are too strict and he doesn't want to lose friends? I agree he shouldn't sneak out. Maybe use this as a way to open the communication to the next level? Be open and receptive. Truly listen. Then set up the boundaries for your house and consequences. I have offered my 15yr old a ride anytime any hour no questions asked and no consequences to guarantee he never rides in a car with someone who is not sober, so I may be a little more lenient...

Dawn - posted on 07/14/2011

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I would ask him where he Is going and If he's going to a friends to play world of war craft then don't panic. Don't assume the worst, maybe let his friends hang out at your house more often. Please let us know what happens. Good luck. :)

DAWN - posted on 07/14/2011

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my daughta is 13 an she has dun this in past. we had an alarm fitted 2 front door. anotha option is take bedroom door off or locks on the bedroom window. my daughta was brought home by police along wif otha teenagas early hrs of the am. the police will report it to social services 2. good luck xxx.

Esther - posted on 07/14/2011

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I used to do this during school year because I didn't filled my void with God's word. My mom never tell me how does she feel and explain the reason. All she was do condemn me. Sometime parents have to be tough love with their children like putting them into probation and visit prison or attend workshop. I was pretty rebelled. I have to go through hard life which will teach me lesson. I believe that parent should try do their best but they couldn't wrist children's arm. It's hard to accept but what else they can do. Love always remain! Children will come back! Stay strong, mom. You are doing good job. ;)

D A - posted on 07/14/2011

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There's no simple solution to this. And the way you handle it really needs to reflect the nature of your relationship (and household rules/guidelines) up to this point in time. No kid "sneaks out" at 16 without context - including the ways in which the household members interrelate long before the teen years hit.

If he's a private kid, he's less likely to talk to you, so you need to ease things out of him. If he's an angry kid - or if there have been mood changes or other disruptive changes (your social life? your job situation? the other parent? some peer situation? money?) - then this may be a reaction to that - and sneaking out to see a girl isn't the only possibility. It could be sneaking out to hang with friends (also sneaking out), to smoke (cigarettes or pot), to drink. None of this is unusual - much as we might want to think otherwise. And all of it is more likely when they're at the age of experimentation, and if something is bothering them.

Talk first. Yes. Preferably in a way that feels safe for him to respond - honestly. You need to know what's going on before you can help resolve it. And wouldn't you rather know, instead of having sneaking around and denial on top of what he's doing and the why?

My two cents. With two teen boys (and all their friends), I've been there...

Michelle - posted on 07/13/2011

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Remove the bedroom door to his room, privacy and respect is earned. As a mom to 4 girls, I've learned sometimes they do things just because they can. My oldest started slamming the bedroom door when she was angry and locking everyone out of her room so we removed the door for 6 weeks till her attitude changed. I can tell you she is 22 now and married, she never forgot losing that bit of privacy.

Cheryl - posted on 07/12/2011

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16 is a very difficult and tricky age to deal with. Almost an adult, capable of driving a car, so many privileges and none of the real life responsibilities that go along with it. I told my children from an early age, that there would probably be things they would want to do that I would not always agree with, however, I want them to tell me where to look for their body. I guess I am fortunate, there were a couple of occasions when they actually spent the night, or went out late and came in after 2am. We had discussions of who is out at 2am on the roads, and what people are usually doing at the time of the morning. There are certainly times in our children's lives when we cannot control what they are doing and rules will be broken to do what they chose. I decided earlier on that I wanted open communication as a priority to rule defiance and that hopefully that would serve both of us better in the big game of life.

Consistency is a key element with whatever road you chose. I would guess your son is sneaking out for sex considering the hour he is out. Communication is key and maybe he doesn't want to tell you where he is going, but then you should ask him who does know where he is at, because we all need to have our backup person. Share with him why you tell people where you are going, and really again why it is so important. It really doesn't hurt to remind him yet again how important he is to you and how you would feel if something life-threatening happened to him and what you really are thinking and worried about happening when he sneaks out. There are very real concerns to worry about! At his age it is more than respect or following rules that have us protecting and concerned for each other. Maybe he could be the one that you check in with and have him responsible for making sure you are ok all hours of the day. Ask him what he would do if you were sneaking out and if it would bother him.
I know this is nothing to joke about, and somehow you need to get that across to him while still letting him know how empty your life would be if something happened to him.

Kayla - posted on 06/29/2011

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Be open and NOOOOO yelling! I used to sneak out cause I had tons of stuff on my plate at that age. Full time student with some honor classes and a job after school. I would sneak out at night so I could walk around and cool off from the day and try to relax. I didn't go to friends, I didn't go to parties. (well I did once and I didn't even drink and that's the one night I got caught, go figure) My parents were in a hard spot at the time and alot of weight was put on my sholders. Walking around at night and going to the park to sit and swing helpped me alot to unwind. So try to figure out why. And if the kid is going out and parting and just being rebelious. The thing that worked for my brother who was going out and parting and getting into trouble was nailing the windows shut and the door came off of his bedroom! Priviliges were taken, tough love.
Hopefully this helps.

Ember - posted on 06/23/2011

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screwng the windows shut was exactly what my parents did...i can tell ya, i never did sneak out of my parents house. (the screws were because my older sister WAS sneaking out) but there was NEVER a "good reason" my sister was sneaking out, like some of the parents on here seem to be implying.

Carol - posted on 06/22/2011

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I hope I don’t get censured for this long post . . .

Anyone ever watch 7th Heaven? In this show, the parents always confronted broken rules, curfew infringements, and all purposeful misbehavior, no matter what it was by imposing stiff, but definite and reasonable consequences, and they followed through. If one of the kids stayed out all night, no matter what the reason, staying out all night was not acceptable behavior and there were consequences. Not much slipped by them. Their keys, as I saw them were the following:

Lesson #1 - CONSISTENCY. They rarely, if ever modified an imposed consequences.

Lesson #2 - DISCRETION. They did their best neither to over react to what their kids did, nor did they under react.

Lesson #3 - CONDITIONAL ACCEPTANCE of their kid’s peers who they might not have been fond of or who may have had questionable behavior. However they did their best to get to know these friends while staying close enough to their children to share their thoughts and insights on things.

Lesson #4 - They had the CONFIDENCE to confront their kids in front of their peers but never demeaned their children, only addressed the behavior and extracted them from the situation.

Lesson #5 - LOVE - They loved their kids enough to follow through, despite their feelings of not wanting to take action or follow through, or wanting to curtail some part of their punishment.

Lesson #6 - LOVE IS NOT NEGOTIABLE.

The point of all this - they didn’t cower at imposing consequences for their children, and they followed through, although they did use great discretion in decision making. The parents were a good balance for each other, even though they didn’t always agree with each other’s approach to discipline. Whether they did or not, they backed each other up.
And yes, I know that’s TV where everything goes right . . . BUT the examples there are valid.

I believe in negotiating AFTER controlling the situation, with the fullest knowledge of what happened and why. By negotiating I don’t mean backing off on discipline or saying, “Oh, go ahead and do it but be careful and don’t call me if you get arrested,” but discussing their actions with them and deciding what to do to help them avoid the behavior and the consequences in the future, then reiterating the ground rules and expectations for the future.

Erin - posted on 06/22/2011

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I would suggest approaching him and letting him know that you are aware that he is sneaking out, and that he is not as sneaky as he thinks he is. Next I would sit down with him and negotiate better ways to get what he wants. I am not suggesting rewarding the sneaking, but I would suggest considering modifying the rules to match his needs at this age. Also, you may want to check the curfew laws in your area and make sure he is aware of the consequences if he gets caught and does not have permission to be out. The biggest thing at this age is building trust so you two can work together, he is almost to the age where he will be fully responsible for his actions, its a good time for him to start sharing that responsiblilty.

Kathleen - posted on 06/22/2011

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My children are younger, so I haven't had this experience yet. A very good friend of mine had a daughter who used to sneak out at night. She let her daughter know that she had prvided her with a beautiful bed and room to sleep in at night. Because she chose not to use them, she could now sleep in a sleeping bag on the floor of the parents' bedroom until she could be trusted again. The daughter is now 22 and says that it was the best thing her Mom ever did. She was heading down a very dangerous path and this stopped her short. Good luck!

Ember - posted on 06/22/2011

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well there are a couple answers i could give...guess it depend on how far your willing to go! my parents had a harsh but effective method...they screwed my windows shut. no joke. even more effective than an alarm! but if it was me, i would tell my son or daughter that the next time they were found to be missing, the police would be called and they would either be reported as a run-away...which has a hefty fine as penalty in some states, or as an "amber alert" aka missing child. i have a feeling any teen would be mortified to come home and find their house crawling with police searching for my "missing child"

Suzy N Marty - posted on 06/22/2011

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Hi, arnt teenage years FUN!!! We had 5, the youngest is 19 and just headed off to join the others on his OE. Our success rate for not sneaking out was actually very good... the reason ...we sat the kid of the moment down and told them how we hated the thought of not knowing where they were and how we would be up all night worrying and how mum had a VERY active imagination and would imagine much worse stuff happening and how that impacted on the whole family. We said we trusted them to make good decisions cause wed taught them too and if they needed to go out then they just needed to talk to us. We also pushed the if you dont get eniough sleep mid week you will have to practice the 'supermarket scanning action' as you will be too tired at school to study and working in a supermarket will be the total sum of your job opportunities. We only had to really work on this with the first child then the trickle down effect happened and the older ones kept the younger ones in line. So much so that when one did take a step a wee bit too far off the straight and narrow the older kids 'dealt' with it by giving him such a talking too about shaming the family that he NEVER went that little bit too far again!

Marilynn - posted on 06/22/2011

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I'm so sorry you're dealing with this- I'm not sure talking is going to help. I went through this with my oldest- here's the motto I lived by during that time: "If what you are about to say or do doesn't have a high probability to make things better- don't say it, don't do it.
Good luck!

Misline - posted on 06/22/2011

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Where is he trying to go? Get ADT the alarm system will stop him dead in his track or just extend his curfew or enforce one!

Alicia - posted on 06/22/2011

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I would find out why he is sneaking out. I only say this because I use to as a teenager and it was just simply to goof around with my friends since my parents were very strict and not at all involved in my life, but I know there were other kids who did it to drink or use drugs...and even to have sex. Is he a good kid otherwise?

Dee - posted on 06/21/2011

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I like the cactuses and duct tape idea. When my son snuck out we locked him out. I put a pillow and a blanket on the porch and locked the door. He had to sleep in the garage in 50 degree weather. He never done it again. I now have an alarm on our doors and windows so if my 16 yr old even tries, shes busted! I don't think she will because we set boundries with her early. We also taught her that as long as she respects our rules we will be lenient on her. You need to find out the cause then there must be consequences. If you don't start now it'll just get worse.

Autumn - posted on 06/21/2011

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Don't know enough about the situation to really give advice about the behaviour itself, but as far as the prevention goes, put something that makes an extremely loud noise on the windows and doors when they open. And don't tell him they are there until he opens them and gets caught.:P

Bryndís - posted on 06/21/2011

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Whatever he's doing in the middle of the night, it's dangerous to be out there. Talk to him, find out why he is leaving the house at night. And what ever you do, don't raise your voice. Never lose your temper. And then try to get to an agreement, when he is allowed out and mutual understanding on curfew. Maybe you should check him for drugs? And I also liked the adwice on taking the door to his room away :) I have a 16 year old myself and there are no problems. We talk all the time and we respect each other. Mutual understanding and some sort of a contract works for us. Like, I'm paying for his drivers licence since he is not smoking, drinking alchohol or using drugs. It's encouraging for him to have this contract with me and I know I can trust him :)

Romona - posted on 06/21/2011

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Either you or your husband be waiting outside his window or whatever means he has of escaping and tell him that you will do this EVERY night if it is necessary.

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