My 21mth old daughter has Asthma, is on Ventillin/FloVent, & just got pediapred? Advice?

Katherin - posted on 02/23/2011 ( 7 moms have responded )

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She had an asthma attack the other night and we had to rush her to the hospital. They gave her 5 days worth of Pedia Pred, but I have heard it has bad side-effects. Any other Mums dealing with Toddler Asthma. It's so scary, and I HATE hearing her suffer at night with the coughing and wheezing. She is still too young for a respitory exam and they don't want to do an xray either. Our Pediatrician who deals with respitory issues put her on an asthma plan of ventillin and flovent - but I just wanted some advice from others Mums who are in the same boat!

BTW - I vacuum and dust her area constantly to make sure there is no dust or mold. But we do live in a house that is almost 40 years old, so i'm not sure what could be behind the walls! I'm grasping here - but can't think of what else it could be!

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Katherin - posted on 02/24/2011

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Wow, thank you so much for sharing your experience and giving such great life experience advice! I was just speaking with my husband lady nite about the cows milk issue. We have been giving her lactose free milk in the mornings only and supplementing with lots of yogurt and so
Sometimes pediasure. But I will definitely look into the alternatives you suggested. Her flare up has calmed somewhat but I can still hear her wheeze when she sleeps. I just wish I knew what on earth could have caused it all in the first place! I had a bit of asthma as a child but only for a short time, and seasonal and pet allergies my whole life. My husband is as healthy as a mule however!

Laura - posted on 02/23/2011

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I am 45 and have had moderate/severe asthma since I was a kid! The difference is I wasn't diagnosed until I was about 12 - 13 so I didn't have all of the medication when I was little (it wasn't bad then). What parents often think of as their kids growing out of asthma during their teen years is not true. Asthma often improves during puberty because lungs are growing larger. Once growth stops, however, the asthma often returns. This is what happened to me. I can also tell you now that long-term use of asthma medication DOES have consequences! The side effects WILL become problematic at some point; allergic reactions to a well-used med CAN occur (happened to me with Flovent and Asthmacort); and tolerence to meds DOES occur, requiring changes. Of all of the meds to watch out for, prednisone has the most severe side effects, namely liver damage, and should only be used short-term (immediate treatment for a particular flare-up). It should never be used long-term (for months), IMO. Having used asthma medication for over 20 years, daily, I have now developed heart arythmia, most likely due to the meds, according to my doctor. This diagnosis came because I have no other indicators for heart problems. With all of that said, I probably wouldn't have made it this far in life without the meds!



What I have been able to do, however, is lower the dosage of my meds--I take the lowest CHILDREN'S dosage of Symbicort! It works, IMO, because I do something else that my doctor was, at first, dismissive about: I made dietary changes that eliminated certain things that I ate.



First and formost--ditch the cow's milk! Cow's milk is well documented at creating mucus in the body. Mucus is already a problem in asthmatic lungs! I switched to soy and rice milk, but almond and hemp milks work as well. These milks are fortified so they are nutritionally equivelent to cow's milk. Next, avoid additives! Additives are chemicals that are put in processed foods. These include things like MSG, sulfites (a KNOWN cause of asthma flare-ups!), artificial flavorings, dyes, and preservatives. Read labels carefully. Finally, avoid high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)! HFCS also is known to create mucus in the body. Honey as a replacement sweetener is especially helpful to asthmatics that suffer from allergies IF a locally produced honey is used. It can desensitize allergic reactions to local pollens if used regularly, thus reducing potential allergic asthma flare-ups.



There is a draw-back to switching to these alternatives: Cost. The market has replacements for just about any favorite processed food but those replacements are expensive. The difference in my grocery bill, however, is MUCH less annually than the cost of doctors and hospital visits! Plus I am able to limit the amount of medication I take! So as an asthmatic, I strongly suggest making these dietary changes--it should help and it can't hurt! Unless your child is allergic to soy...In any case, good luck!

Katherin - posted on 02/23/2011

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We have the aero-chamber (I think that's the same as the nebulizer?). I wish I knew more about the cold air vs. warm-air. There are so many different opinions online pro/con, and my doctor told me either or, basically... Hmmm.
We have been using the singular every night, and so when she had the attack the night before, I had wondered whether it's doing anything at all. But I have also heard only good things about it.
Well - again I appreciate your input. It's also good to hear from someone going through the same thing. I hope your little ones will grow out out of it, as they say most do.
If you can think of anything else, please do write again. I'm open to any suggestions. Thanks!

Medic - posted on 02/23/2011

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With my son(4) he had pneumonia when he was 2 months and that is what has caused him to have continued asthma. We have only ever done 3 day doses of the steroids, that being said with him we have gone back to the dr and had to do another 3 days. I was always told NEVER to use warm air because cool air helps with swelling where as the warm air can make the swelling worse. The singulair has to be given consistantly to help with the allergy aspect of the asthma. It helps control the triggers. We also have all tile floors so that helps with the dust, they are easy to clean. No problem I was a wreck the first few months but now we are all used to it and he knows when he is having a problem because he does not wheeze. My one year old has never been sick so this is her first time on ANY meds at all but they don't think that she will have asthma once she is over the croup. I am a big supporter of the nebulizer over the inhaler because it is easier for me to make sure he does it right.

Katherin - posted on 02/23/2011

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PS - We have also been giving her the Singular tablets each night for the past 2 weeks..

Katherin - posted on 02/23/2011

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Well it's nice to know I'm not the only one, even though the cause is still a mystery to me. How did it start with your little ones? I can't help but think there is something in her general 'living-space' that is affecting it and I can't for the life of me figure it out. I have been told that the winter months are the worst however. We have been using a WARM air humidifier. Are the benefits any different with the cool air? I have also been told that cold air is good for when they may be having an attack. When we brought her home from the hospital the other night, we bundled her up in blankets and walked around in the night air. I did seem to help but only for a while.
The other thing I wanted to know was whether pedia pred should be used for long term, or only when they are having problems. We were only given 5 days worth, but my family Doctor actually told me to stop giving it to her if she is better? Thanks for the advice BTW :)

Medic - posted on 02/23/2011

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My now 4 year old has had asthma since he was 7 months old. That being said both my four year old and one year old are on Oripred(pedia pred) for asthma in one and croup in the baby. The benefits way out weigh the "bad" side effects. My son has been on this steroid more times than I can count and he is fine. Actually the past year we have been able to take him off almost all of his asthma meds and have only done preventative meds just for the winter. My son is on singulair and flovent every day and has an xopenex inhaler for attacks and we use albuterol in his nebulizer when he's having a hard time or is sick. The only med that we have had issues with and decided to discontinue was pulmocourt and the main problem with that was that it gave him bloody nose episodes and was like kiddie crack. If you have any more questions or just want to talk message me. We also have an air purifying filter machine in his room and we use a cool air humidifier.

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