My 3 yr old girl gets out of bed each night and goes thru cupboards,fridge,evrything,We find food,toys and all sorts under her bed.She is like a little bower bird! me & hubby are usually still up but she sneaky, we dont even hear her!does any1 else have this prob, i have 3 other kids & none ever did this! lol

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Vikki - posted on 01/18/2009

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oh wow this is so familiar except i have it on a larger scale my 5 year old wakes up his 3 yr old sister and his 2 year old brother andd the three of them go on a rampage. they generally start at about 5 am and by the time i wake up at around 7 my house is trashed.the other morning i woke up to a buzzing sound and my 5 year old saying "hold still i havnt finished" upon investigation i found my son with the electric clippers giving his sister a buzz cut! after he had shaved a strip down the middle of his own head.I also found every cake mix in my pantry all over my kitchen and 12 tubs of yogurt across the floor.they hide food under their beds or in their wardrobe.I have reached the point of going to the hardwear store and cleaning them out of padlocks slide bolts and locks for the fridge.

Darlene - posted on 01/18/2009

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My boyfriend has two kids (10 & 11) who have had the same problems (and many others)...for the last 6 years we have been fighting with doctors and anyone else who might be able to help to have them believe us when we said there was a problem. The 10 year old is still awaiting a full assessment, but the 11 year old just spend 2 weeks in the psych ward and was diagnosed with adhd & fasd...she is now on 3 kinds of medication and being monitored to see how she does with it. We went through 6 years of hell (and the kids did too) and we finally found out that their lives could be made easier with medication. I'm not saying that there is or isn't anything out of the ordinary going on with your kid, but you owe it to your kids to give them the best possible chance in life and if that includes medication, then so be it.

We also did alarms on the doors and webcams in the rooms so we could see if they were actually going to sleep or if they were up playing - very helpful!

Nicole - posted on 01/19/2009

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my 2yo did that. we put a gate on her door. that way we can still leave her door open to hear if she needs anything and it keeps her in her room. hope that helps.

Pati - posted on 01/15/2009

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My daughter used to get up and rearrange the house when she was between 2 and 3, at first I thought it was my husband messing with me but the cups would be in the wrong cupboards All of them, and other things were moved around it happened a few times a week for awhile.  It was the oddest thing, till one night about 3 am I went down stairs and she had fallen asleep on the couch with a movie on of course the cups were all rearranged again and I knew it was her. I had a talk with her in the morning about it not being safe to get up and do my housework at night and that if she wanted to help me with the chores she could do that, but only in the day time.  



Much to my suprise  nothing was ever out of place again. She did still sneak down to watch a movie now and then, and still gets up in the middle of the night and goes in to the living room.

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Evelyn - posted on 01/19/2009

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Do what I did... get a stair gate for her bedroom door so once she's in bed she knows the gate gets shut and she doesnt get to walk around the house... we didnt put the gate on our girl door because we where lazy... we did it so she was safe and in her room if she woke through the night or in the morning and so she didnt hurt herself by running riot through the house b4 we got up.



xxEVxx

Rebecca - posted on 01/18/2009

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My kids used to get up by 5:30am every morning, sometimes as early as 4:45. There are some really high safety gates now that you can get. We used to put a gate on our sons door opening when he first went into a toddler bed. We also have a gate at the top of the stairs. Our son can now open the stair gate but his sister can't.

We have our house set up so that they can't get to anything dangerous if we happen to sleep later than them. The only thing I am considering changing is putting a bolt to stop them getting into the garage. They did that once and I don't stay in bed once I hear them anymore. They made a tower of Coke cans on the kitchen table when they ran out of space in the fridge, and then came upstairs very pleased with themselves and wanted to know what to do with the other cans.....

I would not lock a childs door.

Vikki - posted on 01/18/2009

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i know of someone who did put a lock on their childs door and got into trouble with the chid protection board because it is a form of child abuse.

Kylie - posted on 01/18/2009

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You can put a lock on everything in the house EXCEPT the childs door. Its a massive safety problem, it means the child cant get out of their room.... for ANY reason...electrical fire in their room during the night........burgular through their window...... they have a terrible nightmare and cant get to you, being stuck in a dark room would scare the daylights out of them! Not to mention that locking any child in a room is nasty in the first place, the child will have trust issues for life! I'm a member of the Australian Child Protection Board and i cant believe someone would even suggest it. It's like something out of Flowers in the Attic.

Stacy - posted on 01/16/2009

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My son was not sleep walking when he did things like this.  He was wide awake.  Feb, 2 years ago, we woke up and found that he had gone over 2 baby gates (with huge cowbells on them).  He never made a sound.  Still dont know how.  His room was right outside ours.  Anyway, he went and unlocked the door and let himself outside at 4am in 18 degree weather.  We have no idea how long he was out there.  This is not the only time he has done stuff like that.  He has climbed over baby gates, played with knives in the kitchen, moved the Christmas tree, etc, etc.  He is now 4.5 yrs old. 




We took him to a childs psychologist. (hope I didnt misspell that).  He was diagnosed with ADHD.  I know a lot of children are wrongly diagnosed, but he truely does have it.  At this young age, his little mind just keeps him going and going to where he has problems sleeping through the night.  I am not saying that this is what is going on with your little one, but if it continues, I would have a consult with a doctor.  Just wanted to share our experiences.

Stacy - posted on 01/16/2009

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My son was not sleep walking when he did things like this.  He was wide awake.  Feb, 2 years ago, we woke up and found that he had gone over 2 baby gates (with huge cowbells on them).  He never made a sound.  Still dont know how.  His room was right outside ours.  Anyway, he went and unlocked the door and let himself outside at 4am in 18 degree weather.  We have no idea how long he was out there.  This is not the only time he has done stuff like that.  He has climbed over baby gates, played with knives in the kitchen, moved the Christmas tree, etc, etc.  He is now 4.5 yrs old. 




We took him to a childs psychologist. (hope I didnt misspell that).  He was diagnosed with ADHD.  I know a lot of children are wrongly diagnosed, but he truely does have it.  At this young age, his little mind just keeps him going and going to where he has problems sleeping through the night.  I am not saying that this is what is going on with your little one, but if it continues, I would have a consult with a doctor.  Just wanted to share our experiences.

Kristen - posted on 01/16/2009

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I wouldn't feel guilty at all about putting a door knob cover on to keep her in her room, at least until she gets the idea.  It's not safe at all for her to be wandering the house at night, unwatched.  She could really get into trouble.  You definitely need to teach her to stay in her room.

Kristen - posted on 01/16/2009

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I wouldn't feel guilty at all about putting a door knob cover on to keep her in her room, at least until she gets the idea.  It's not safe at all for her to be wandering the house at night, unwatched.  She could really get into trouble.  You definitely need to teach her to stay in her room.

Madelein - posted on 01/15/2009

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R U SURE SHES NOT SLEEP WALKING? MY DAUGTER SLEEP WALKS, DOC SAIS ITS HER MIND THATS SO BUZZZZZZZY!

Dominique - posted on 01/15/2009

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my nearly 5yr old son sleep walks and its really funny. one time he got out of bed and took his pjs off and went and laid on the couch, when my husband woke him up he just got up and went to bed. another time we were watching a movie and he walked past us with his pillow and went downstairs and we asked what he was doing and he said that he was going to the toilet( even though theres one upstairs too) and we followed him and he was asleep on the toilet. he does this a few times a month, we think he is just dreaming. it will probably pass but if you think its more serious then go see a doctor. good luck

Priscilla - posted on 01/15/2009

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thank u to every1, i am a bit worried, try to ignore, but the final straw was the other nite, she climb on kitchen drawers got scissors from top off fridge and gave herself and the cat a haircut!! the cut ended up with a nick. i was so scared she had nicked herself! she hadnt,but she was wide awake then! i was in the next room, cat didnt even cry :/ she starts kindy in few weeks, with a mullet!! lol, but seriously, im hoping its a stage and she outgrow it!

Alexandria - posted on 01/15/2009

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we have recently been through the same thing. We have found our discipline wasnt consistant enough and we also put child locks on everything, from the fridge, toy cupboard, pantry.. u name it.. it has a lock. We explained to him why we were putting locks on things and had a punishment for each time he did what he was not supposed to do - like not being able to have an extra toy for the day etc. Some children are very head strong and im sure it is just a phase, but if she is anything like our little one - continuing the explanation of why it is not allowed will hopefully work in the meantime. It is a safety issue when little ones are getting into things without you realising it, so best of luck and i hope your little bower bird stops hoarding very soon! ; )

Elizabeth - posted on 01/15/2009

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I can still remember being around that age and wandering about the house in the night time.  It was great fun.  I loved sneaking about, being as quiet as a mouse (which was my nickname since before I could even walk and before people knew what kind of person I would grow up into).  Even more fun than that, I was getting a chance to get into areas of the house that I knew I was unable to get into.  Young children -love- to explore.  Everything they see is something new and different.  I remember climbing way up onto the luggage tower in my grandmother's closet to dig through the boxes at the top of them.  To her they were just boxes of old junk she didn't need laying around, but to me they were exciting boxes of treasure and all kinds of things I'd never seen, touched, or smelled before.  This curiousity is a wonderful gift and it should be nurtured, but you're completely right about being worried about this behavior.  There are a lot of things that young children should absolutely not be playing with when we aren't watching them, and a lot of ways they can accidentally hurt themselves (my son once pulled a heavy chair down onto himself by pulling on the blanket that was draped over the back.  I had just popped into the kitchen to get a sippy cup of milk in the time it took to happen.  He had no concept of what was happening when the chair had begun to rock, and didn't understand that the blanket wouldn't just become unstuck if he pulled harder.  It was an entire week before we could get him near the chair without crying again).



There are a few things you can do:



1) Recognize that she's a reasonable little human and reward her curiousity in safe ways.  Explain to her very seriously that she must stop wandering around getting into things or she might get hurt, and it would be very sad to you if your baby got hurt.  Then, offer to allow her time to explore these things when you're there, so you both can talk about the things she's finding and she'll come to understand what is there.



2) Lock-down your house so she'll be safe.  You may want to do this anyway.  Put latches on your cabinets, refridgerator, toilet, door knobs to danger rooms.  Place gates in the doorways before you go to sleep.  One mother who had this problem once asked if she should get a latch and lock her daughter into the room.  I very much advise against locking your child in a room, even though it's for her own good.  Especially if she's potty training, this can be tragic.  If the issue isn't merely curiousity being released during a time that no one's there to stop her from doing it, then this may be your only option to fully keep her safe.  Put bells on her door way and adjust them so she can't open her door without making racket.  I know that a lot of the time my nocturnal sneaking was caused more by the fact that I couldn't sleep.  I've always been the kind of person who feels awake until 3 or 4 in the morning, and then desires to sleep until noon, even then.  She might simply be having sleeping trouble, and then the ability to satisfy that deep curiousity that all children have is just a perk to it.  If you're unable to get her to stop doing it by reasoning and rewarding her good behavior, then the only thing you may be able to do is physically secure her in some way.  But again, I advise against locking her in her room, tying her up, or otherwise caging her into bed (all methods I've heard desperate mothers understandably wondering if they should try).



3) Ignore that there's a problem entirely and allow something terrible to potentially happen.  I don't mean to scare you with this.  My mother only vaguely knew about my sneaking abouts, since I wasn't quite so overt with my pilfering.  She didn't ever do anything to stop me from doing it, and nothing bad ever happened to me.  However, you can see the shine on the revolver trigger in this game, I'm sure, which is why you're messaging here for help.



4) I've suggested this one elsewhere, and this one's kind of a corollary to number 1 and 2, in a way.  Set up some kind of reward system so that she gets something for controlling her urges to get up and wander around at night.  If she isn't sleepwalking, (which is a valid possibility as well, so you will definitely want to mention it to the doctor if it doesn't seem that using psychology will work) then she will eventually find herself motivated to do as you would desire.  My mother used poker chips for me.  We purchased some toys together that I liked and she put price tags on them, and each day I got poker chips for good behavior of various kinds.  Chores, being nice, taking my vitamins, no potty accidents, this sort of thing.  She also gave me one per day just for being me, which made me feel pretty special and I still understood that if I was good and remembered to go potty in time I got lots more and would more quickly get my toy.  When she outgrows the behavior, the poker chip for not doing it can be given to her for doing a chore or some kind, or something else you'd like her to do.  Children very frequently respond better to positive reinforcement of this kind than to being punished for their bad behavior.  Punishment makes them feel frightened and endangered.  Positive reinforcement simply guides them into the behaviors that they should have, which we need to understand that they don't always understand why they should be doing these things.  She may not really understand how dangerous her wandering around is, and doesn't really need to if she understands that when she doesn't do it she will be rewarded.  When she's older she'll understand that you were trying to get her to stop doing it because you didn't want her to get into the gummy vitamins and OD on iron or some other absolutely horrible fate.

Brein - posted on 01/15/2009

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Dear Priscilla,



My name is Brein and I am a 29 year old mother of 2 ( boys ages 4 and 1 ). Your questions about your daughter caught my eye because my parents has similar complaints about me as a young child. Since age two until today I sleep walk. I have packed lunches, had full conversations and (i've been told) dressed and undressed a barbi dolls.  My mom had a small door alarm placed on my bedroom door so that she would hear when I got up out of bed. Now that I live in a 2 story house a locking baby gate keeps me from wondering down stairs and into rooms that could contain harmful objects. I was told I would grow out of this and I am still waiting for that day to come. In the mean time there are small adjustment that can be made that will make life a lot easier for you and your daughter. If you have any questions please feel free to e-mail me.



Brein

Priscilla - posted on 01/15/2009

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a few people thort she may be sleep walking but when i have caught her she acts like a startled rabbit and then runs back to bed,saying i sorry! lol. it is funny sometimes but she got into the xmas pressies and open her sisters, and she ate all the easter eggs last year!! so been going on for bit, cant lock her door coz she needs loo, and she shares room with her 11 yr old sister.

Crystal - posted on 01/15/2009

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LMAO it sounds like my 4 1/2 yr old, he is so quiet and sneaks around when he wants somthing he knows he is not allowed, we find all the wrappers under his bed!!!

Amber - posted on 01/15/2009

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have her seen by a doc she can be sleep walking my sister did the same thing soes she tell u she dont know why she did it or mabe it wasent her just go to your doc and tell them it could be more serious then u think

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