my 4 year 11 month old still has night terrors any suggestions on handling

Jessica - posted on 01/11/2010 ( 28 moms have responded )

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my 4 .11 year old still has night terrors when do they stop she now wets during and im not sure what to do for the best she appears to be unawear telling me most mornings she slept all night in her bed good girl (but i now we were up at 10.30 wet changed screaming etc back to sleep again at 2 no wet and wet and all at 5.30 that is a bad night and not all are that bad but at least 2 nights a week for 4 years is to much

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Majid Feizi Pour - posted on 07/22/2013

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hi dear

i want research about eeg signal classification

But I do not know how

Please help me

how i find authentic and valid dataset? for example Epilepsy

and how load and classification in Matlab?

i dont know matlab code?


Do you know someone who could help me anymore?and any site and ...???

Please help me
Sorry about that : my english not good
thanks a lot

Majid1751@yahoo.com

[deleted account]

Hi there, my now 5 year old used to have night terrors, not so much screaming but constant crying and no matter what we did (cuddles etc) he would just be sobbing in bed and not even awake. Sometimes he would sceam out that the 'feet' were coming to get him an then i was becoming paranoid that there was someone in the house because it was so real to him that I thought there must be something 'real' happening. Out of desperation, my sister in law mentioned a paediatric chiropractor just new in our town so I booked him in and SERIOUSLY have NOT had any problems since. He sleeps so well, that you cant wake him until he is ready to wake. I know Chiro is not for everyone but it really worked for us.

Beth - posted on 01/21/2010

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My son woke up at least 4 times a night for his first 4 yrs of life. He would wake up scared and trembling and the doctors said it was night terrors. We pursued it further and got an ambulatory EEG. It turned out that he has 8 seizure episodes in that one night. He was put on seizure medication and slept well after that. If you feel it isn't night terrors than demand more tests.

Kathie - posted on 01/21/2010

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I don't agree with the hands off approach, because I pretty much have to hold my son down, or keep him from hurting himself.
I still believe in turning the lights on and getting him to wake up to where he can answer with a yes or no, then getting him back to sleep. I have never noticed him being more tired in the morning after a night terror.

Melissa - posted on 01/21/2010

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You should see a sleep specialist. That type of Dr. can help you with certain things to do. If u r in the NY area you can call 212-871-0227 and see Dr. A. Rodriguez. or look into the website nysleepinstitute.com. If you are not in the NY area you can loo-up Dr's in your area at the AASM.com.

Shannon - posted on 01/21/2010

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When my now eight year old son was two, he had horrible night terrors. He would wake up screaming several times a night. His pediatrician told me to give him a dose of Benadryl before bed. It worked magic and there are really no side effects except drowsiness. They also use it for children with anxiety and lots of other things. He only went through it for a few months and then it stopped and he went back to sleeping through the night again. Our doctor recommended this treatment because his night terrors were pretty severe. So far my second child, who is now two, hasn't had them at all.

Kathie - posted on 01/20/2010

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My other kids have all had nightmares, but never night terrors. my son also has nightmares, but they are so different than night terrors. as they get older they become more intense. my son also yells mommy, mommy, while running around the room and crying. i'm glad he hasn't had any in a while, he's gotten stronger and i'm worried that i won't be able to hold him down. Good luck to you.

Carolyn - posted on 01/20/2010

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a friend of mine had this problem with her young son. she and her husband prayed scripture over his room and played a c.d. of the Bible at night. he hasn't had a single night terror since. God's word is powerful.

Kathie - posted on 01/20/2010

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My son had night terrors until almost his 11th b-day. The thing that I found that worked the best about getting him to come out of it was turning the lights on and just keep saying his name until he answers. He never remembers them the next day. Until someone has a child that has night terrors, they have no idea how scary it can be. My other adopted child hasn't had any, but her life started out differently than his.

Jessica - posted on 01/17/2010

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thankyou bless you i am an old fashioned mum to i have read at bed time every night (except if ive been ill ) since my first was about 4 months and i have a strict take on telly baby eistien baby bright were wonderfull now progressing to gentle cartoons but no more than 2 hours max a day there is so much you can do with a little one and telly stops adults and can have such a negative inpact on little people thankyou so much for the message

Karen - posted on 01/16/2010

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Have you tried reading her bedtime stories before she goes to sleep?
I read mine upbeat happy fairytales. If you havent tried that yet, give it a shot.Read in a soft soothing happy voice. It may not stop everyone of the terrors immediatly but you should see less and less of them. Have patience and monitor closely what she watches on tv.

Jessica - posted on 01/15/2010

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thankyou felt sorry for granny but relieved it had happened to some onne else it was not just me and granny listened a lot more closely to how the girls are all things come right eventuall all things make you stronger

Colleen - posted on 01/15/2010

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Thanks, my boys can get up to some serious mischief!! Oh shame poor granny, it is very scary! I hope things come right for you soon.

Jessica - posted on 01/15/2010

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ahh yes the screams you can not explain it to some one who does not have the terrors can you. my poor mother in law had my little one over night the last couple of nights granny was thrilled the little one has only stayed with granny odd nights before and not had a terror i( i was beginning to think it was me causing them some how ) but last night she had a huge one sleep talking (mummy let me in ) then screaming granny scooped her up she went ridged kicking screaming pushing then sobbing uncontrolled then she fell asleep longest night of grannys life poor thing she looked awful

Jessica - posted on 01/15/2010

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no just the two theres 17 months between my little one is very strong willed but adores her sister and wants to be like her rebecca i guess is a softer character but still strong dress them the same when they ask hence the picture your picture is lovely they look good but i bet there is mischief in those eyes :)

Colleen - posted on 01/15/2010

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Max has ground his teeth flat. I hear him doing it in his sleep. Glad the waking thing is working for you so far. If only I'd known back then to do that. Guess why the internet is so great because you can get help faster these days. I know I was a sleep walker and my sister was as well so maybe it is genetic .....only we didn't scare my mother out of her skin with screaming.

Colleen - posted on 01/15/2010

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Have you also got twins?...just looking at your profile picture. Max is my 'youngest', entirely strong willed but a big baby when it comes to many things.

Jessica - posted on 01/15/2010

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yes i agree would be nice to have a manual :)
have started lifting her at 11 taking her to the toilet and putting her back to bed she has had 2 clear nights this week :)
i noticed when i lift her she grinds her teeth .

Jessica - posted on 01/15/2010

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yes she is a real wiggle bot we even tried laying with her when she was little she started very early but either one of us would fall asleep and she would be all over and then a star then you might wake up with her curled up asleep on your head (quite a fright at first ) so we went to the doctor and were told to leave her or try waking her before they started thankou for the support it is appriciated

Colleen - posted on 01/15/2010

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Just read the post on the Night Terrors above and looks like my son had that PMLD (limb movement thing). He also used to be a body rocker, head banger and still grinds his teeth!! Guess my hugging thing has sorted out the night terrors but now there appears to be more for me to check up on. If only children came with manuals!!

Colleen - posted on 01/15/2010

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Hi Jessica. Yes my son did go through a stage where he would scream 'mommy, mommy' and I would be saying 'mommy is here'. He would push me out of the way and scream.. 'no,not you, I want my mommy'. It was quite scary and almost made me believe in the past life thing where people believe that you can come back again and again in different bodies.



When he did that I would just talk to him gently and sit with him till he stopped screaming as he wouldn't let me hug him either. It would sometimes take a while for him to calm down. My husband also used to get freaked out and would get angry about it. I eventually told him to just let me deal with it as he was not helping me to stay calm and I could only deal with one thing at a time.



I found if I got to Max before he got too worked up I could hug him and he didn't fight with me. After the age of about 5 he never mentioned the 'other mother' ever again and I was able to hug him with no problem. I think it's all about timing and patience.



It will get better as your daughter matures.



Does your daughter wiggle around her bed alot at night? I often find my son sleeping sideways then he's this way round and that way round....he's like a clockhand, never stays on the pillow end if you know what I mean!

Ella - posted on 01/12/2010

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How To Stop Night Terrors
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Commonly experienced from infancy through to the preschool years, night terrors have no detrimental impact on the child but can be unexpectedly traumatic for the parents

Night terrors, like many medical afflictions, have a curious history. Once thought to be devil possession, with exorcism as the "cure", they are now understood to be a common physical disorder affecting around five percent of children under the age of five.

What are night terrors?
Night terrors are a known sleep disorder that typically affects infants and toddlers. As a child moves from slow-wave sleep (non-dream sleep) to Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep (dream sleep), he will often bolt up in his bed or cot with his eyes open, and scream, kick and cry as if in awful pain.

The behaviour is believed to be caused by electrical currents in the brain that arouse the child from deep sleep but not enough to fully wake him. It can go on for as little as five minutes or last up to 45 minutes depending on the child, and can be very distressing for the parent or caregiver; however solace can be found in knowing that the child is not in any pain, is not frightened, is still asleep and is not aware of his actions.

In fact, children will not have any recollection of their nighttime activity and will be bright eyed and bushy tailed the next morning. It’s the parents who are bleary eyed and sleep deprived.

There is no known external cause for these disturbances; however they do have a genetic link. They are a type of parasomnia, a medical classification that also includes sleep walking, sleep talking, teeth grinding, body rocking and head banging.

'In most instances there is a first-degree relative who suffered from a parasomnia in childhood,' explains Dr Arthur Teng, Director of the Sleep Medicine Unit at Sydney Children's Hospital Randwick. It is rare to see children with night terrors where some sort of nighttime activity is not part of the family history.

When should you worry?
Although most of the time children will outgrow night terrors, in cases where they are repetitive and disruptive, and the child does not outgrow them, they should not be ignored. Chris Guilleminault of Stanford University (California, US) found that in 60 percent of chronic cases the terrors are a symptom of an underlying sleep disorder such as Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) or Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD). 'Do not dismiss the night terrors, but ask the pertinent questions,' advises Dr Teng. 'Snoring and sleep apnoea are part of the SDB group and can often be identified by looking for the following signs: does the child snore most nights of the week? Does he have pauses in his breathing where you wonder when will he take his next one? Does the child look like he is struggling to breathe?'

'PLMD, as the name suggests, has to do with limb movement and is exhibited by children who are very restless in their sleep, often kicking their legs uncontrollably and writhing in their sleep. They can be restless during the day as well,' says Dr Teng.

What can be done to stop night terrors?
Even when the night terrors are a result of an underlying SDB, there are some simple things you can do to address the behaviour. Most importantly, try to relax and get some sleep yourself. You'll need it; after all, your child's had a good night's rest and will be raring to go in the morning! In fact, night terrors are often more difficult on the parents than on the child. While it is upsetting to watch your baby scream and thrash about, touching or picking your child up while he is having a terror will only make it worse. It may feel counterintuitive, but the best thing you can do for your child during one of these episodes is to leave him be.

Dr Chris Seton, staff specialist in the Sleep Investigation Unit at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, says two approaches can be taken to help your child: the hands-off approach and, if this is ineffective, the waking program.

'The worst thing a parent can do is to touch or wake the child. Such action will only make the child sleep deprived, which can make the sleep terrors even worse. The best management tool parents can apply is the hands-off approach. I tell parents, "For the next few weeks, instead of running in, grabbing your child and trying to console them, do the opposite: don’t run, walk. Stand in the room, but in the background. Don’t say anything, because the child can't hear you and, in particular, don’t touch them or pick them up,"' he explains. According to Dr Seton, after about a month, the majority of parents will find the night terrors will stop completely.

If the hands-off approach does not work, and there is regularity to the occurrence of the night terrors (they happen at the same time each night), Dr Seton recommends the waking program where you wake the child 20 minutes before the predicted episode. 'If the night terrors are happening at 10.30 every night, I'll tell parents to wake the child at 10.10pm. Wake the child up fully, give him a sip of water, get him out of bed if necessary. If you do this for 10 consecutive nights, in the right child - the child with regular night terrors - two-thirds of the time the night terrors will stop, not just for the night but subsequently. By disrupting the sleep cycle the electrical trigger that prevents the child from reaching the final stage of sleep is also broken. Both the hands-off approach and waking program are good non-drug treatments.'

In a small number of cases a drug treatment is prescribed, however most often the child will either stop on his own or with the help of one of the management tools described above.

Management of night terrors also includes ensuring that your child follows a sleep routine and that he gets enough sleep during the day. Sleep deprivation does not cause terrors, but in kids where they occur, it can make them worse.

When to seek help
If none of the techniques mentioned above work and your child is still having the night terrors, or you are concerned that the nighttime activity is the result of a sleep disorder, you should speak with your family doctor and consider visiting a sleep clinic. There are paediatric sleep clinics in each capital city
Five fast facts about Night Terrors

1.Parasomnias, including night terrors, sleep walking and sleep talking are genetic. Talk to your family and you might discover Aunty Harriet was a sleep walker.
2.The child is not losing sleep over it. They are not nightmares: the child is not awake, he is not afraid of anything and will have no memory of the nighttime activity in the morning. 3.The best thing you can do is leave him be. Do not touch or pick him up. If you are concerned that he may hurt himself, like fall out of bed, stay in the room, but try not to let your presence be known. He will not recognise you.
4.If the hands-off approach doesn’t work, and his night terrors happen at the same time every night, you can try the waking program. Wake him 20 minutes before the predicted time. In the majority of cases this will stop the night terrors after about 10 days.
5.Most kids grow out of them but if your child has belaboured breathing or restless limbs you may like to see if there is an underlying sleep disorder.

Jessica - posted on 01/11/2010

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thankyyou yes we went to school fulltime straight away in sep very strong willed big girl during the day but not so average at night thanktyou for your reply can not believe in so short a time two people have let me know they have them past 5 thanlkyou don't feel so useless was starting to think i wAS THE CAUSE ..

Gwen - posted on 01/11/2010

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I still have night terrors and I'm 34, lol! My doctor described it like this: "The elevator gets stuck between floors. It's like the lights are on, but no one's home."



You could take her to a Sleep Disorder Specialist and have her checked out. He told me that most kids outgrow it around the time they go to school.. ----just read your post above and sounds like you've already done that..



The hugging thing is what usually worked best on me too.

Jessica - posted on 01/11/2010

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did your sun go through a time were he faught you my daughter went through this phase and we were advised to not touch her i have allways found not hugging her very hard but at one point it seemed to make her worse she appeared really frightened of me like your sun my daughter appears awake some times (eyes open)my husband would get cross and say i was pandering to a tantrum till she was diagnosed will tr the hugging thankyou even though your sun still has them i feel better for talking to some one who knows what its like thankyou

Colleen - posted on 01/11/2010

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My son is 10 and has suffered from night terrors since a tiny tot. He would get so worked up that he would vomit. It used to scare me as I didn't know what to do. It has gotten less and less over the years but we still have the odd one. Strangely enough he also experiences his night terrors around 10 to 10.30pm. It must be when they are in a certain stage of their sleep pattern.



I find the best thing to do is as soon as I hear him stir and start crying (earth shattering noise sometimes) I rush into his room and just hug him really tightly against me. I rub his back, kiss the top of his head and tell him that he's safe. Even if his eyes are open I know he's not really awake. I just hold him and comfort him until he calms. He soon relaxes and lies down and continues to sleep.



There have been nights when he's lept out of bed and I've found him fighting the curtains or trying to walk through walls. I again just hold him tightly and gently direct him back to bed and stay with him till he 'sleeps' again.



Just like your daughter, he has no recollection of ever having 'woken' or gone for walks. The good thing is with the hugging method is that it seems to shorten the episodes and there has been no vomiting for years as he hasn't had the time to work himself up to that extreme panic stage.



It can be exhausting but try the hugging method and maybe, like me, you'll find it helps and it won't be so traumatic for you. Unfortunately I can't tell you when it will end but with us it has gotten very few and far between.

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