My almost 2 yr. old daughter was just diagnoses with asthma. She has a nebulizer and uses it twice a day per doctors orders. I really do not like having her on medication at all, is there anyone out there with a child w/asthma who has found a holistic way to manage it?

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[deleted account]

I have asthma, though very mild. I also do not like over-medicating. I use herbs for many things. But not asthma. My daughter is prone to severe hives. She's been put on some pretty serious steroids on several occasions. I wish it didn't have to be, but the alternative is scarier. I could lose her to a serious allergic reaction, just as there is a risk you could lose your daughter to a severe asthma attack. Over the years I've developed a very good relationship with a General Practitioner that I really respect. The great thing is that he respects me as well. I don't follow the usual vaccination chart, and we don't use antibiotics for ear infections. Actually we rarely use antibiotics. We have come to a compromise we both can live with. But when it comes to asthma, I use the medication he prescribes. There is too much on the line. Also, just because something is an herb or considered holistic doesn't necessarily mean it's safer. There are a lot of things out in the woods that can kill you! :) I would suggest bringing your concerns up with your doctor. If you don't feel listened to, find another doctor. Talk about your desire for complementary medicine. More and more doctors are open to this, and he should also know how those therapies would interact with inhalers and traditional medicines.

Leanne - posted on 12/17/2008

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As a parent and a nurse the best advice I can give you is to do as the doctors say. Please for the sake of your child please do not just stop giving medications. If you really feel that medications are bad for your child then make an appointment to talk with the doctor and discuss your concerns and fears. Maybe you and your childs doctor can find a compromise on medications and holistic approaches to treating your child's asthma.

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Christina - posted on 12/19/2008

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I have a daughter who is almost 5 that also has been diagnosed with asthma. She is on the nebulizer once a day using Pumilcort. My father is a holistic doctor and we tried many things before surrendering to the MD. My father OF COURSE does not know she is even on this medication. He would freak out. The thing with Aurora though is she never has attacks. She just coughs constantly and builds mucus up in her lungs, then when she is sick, coughs until she throws it up to get it out of her. Maybe if it was attacks the holistic stuff could have acted differently. I wish you all luck. This has been difficult for us, but I am very proud of my little trooper.

Kristyn - posted on 12/19/2008

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Hi Robin,



Just thought I would add my 2 cents :)



My daughter (3 1/2) has had asthma all her life. Every time she would get the "common" cold it would last forever and she'd end up with the "asthma" cough.

She has had croup several times and we have been in the ER for her asthma.

I have seen an Asthma Educator and we have worked out a plan. I, like you, do not like taking medications nor giving them to my children, however, with asthma you have to be able to control it.

I went out and bought an excellent book, and educated myself further, it helped tremendously.

My daughter is now on Flovent (2 puffs in morning and 2 puffs at night) and Singulaire once a day at bedtime. The Flovent has helped keep the inflammation down in her lungs so that she can breathe much easier, thank goodness we haven't had to use her Ventolin (resuce inhaler) for quite some time.



The very best thing I have found to do is educate yourself so that you know exactly what is going on with your daughter at different times.



Take Care

Bridget - posted on 12/17/2008

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hey my son was diagnosed with asthma by the time he was 1 he is now 14 and we were told 2 years ago that he no longer suffers with it apparently a good steamed room and a healthy happy lifestlye dont hold back on sports she wants to take part in i never did asthma goes in cycles of 5-7 years and as the child grows the lungs are able to become stronger to enable the health problems dissappear dont worry with the help of your doctor with time it will become easier to manage

Claudia - posted on 12/17/2008

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My son (who is also 2) has the same exact treatment - Neb twice a day and Singulair at night. I worry too but after 3 ER trips and a 4 day stint in the PICU I don't take any chances. His onset was so fast that by the time we got him to the hospital they had to neb him pretty much round the clock and put in i.v.s just to get him breathing properly again. I know it seems like alot, but keep up with the treatments the dr. ordered just until you and your daughter have it under control and can figure out the triggers. I hope this helps a bit.

Jennifer - posted on 12/17/2008

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Like you i do not like to give my children medication if i can help it, but i do agree with a lot of the mothers. i have a two year old who has been sick a lot since he was 5 weeks old. He was finally diagnosed with asthma last february after having pneumonia 3 times and broncitis in a 18 month span. cole is now able to fight colds better than last year. i only give him his neubulizer (per dr.'s orders) when he comes down with a bad cold and i feel he is having a hard time breathing. he is put on singular in the summer. i whole if your dr. will not talk to you about your options you should look to find a new one. i know that when i go to my dr. he will not write a script for my child if he does not think he needs it. i hope this help. talk with your dr. to see if there is a different approach, but it is very important your child get good oxygen to the brain and other organs. hope this help

[deleted account]

I am a childcare worker and have two children in my care with asthma. I recently received training about asthma and was really shocked at how serious this disease is. We learned about red flag signs and special medicines to treat them. The most valuable lesson I learned is that asthma is NOT something to mess around with. Children are especially vulnerable to complications and death related to asthma because they can't express what is going on inside. I would encourage you to follow the doctor's orders strictly. I know its tough having your young child exposed to medicine, but if your doctor prescribed it, it is to save her life.

Judy - posted on 12/17/2008

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hi there.

i have a daughter and she is 5. a year and a half ago she became really sick with pneumonia. she now has asthma. my doctor wanted me to give her a puffer 2-3 times a day, every day. like you, i didn't like the idea of giving her medication. so, i kept an eye on shannon and watched to see when she would have an attack or what would bring on an attack.mostly when she was playing and running around with the other kids. i would watch her. she would start to cough a lot and then start to take deeper breaths. i would then bring her over by me and sit her down. after 3-5 minutes, if she wasn't any better, i would then give her 2 puffs from her puffer. when we would have fires in the back yard in the summer, i noticed that would trigger an attack. so, same thing. after 3-5 minutes if her breathing didn't get any better then i would give her her puffer. and shannon will tell me if she can't wait the 3-5 minutes too. shannon knows now when she is having a hard time. i don't have to watch her as much. she will just come over and sit by me. she is in school now and i send it with her every day just in case. she has only needed it three time since school started. all three times, she was running around in the gym.

i'm not sure if i've helped you. every child is different. your child's asthma may be worse than my child. but this is what i do and it works for us. shannon is doing great

PS: shannon also has allergies, environmental, dust, cats, and some moulds. in the summer time i give her Arius once a day. so that might be another factor....

anyway, good luck. hope things work out

[deleted account]

I understand your hesitancy with all the medications, but 2 times a day is not bad....last year, my 5 month old was having 6 treatments with 2 medications EVERY DAY! I know it sounds cold--but don't risk your child's health over this. She needs the medication. I have asthma also. The ideas previously noted, like cold, a steamy room, cleaning and or a hot drink are all excellent helpers...but first you need to understand her triggers--is it allergies, atmosphere (some do better in cold dry air while others need humid heat), does anxiety contribute or aggravate things? She may just be having issues with this time or year (temp or an allergen). I recommend you see an asthma specialist (an immunologist or pulmiologist). For my son, he eventually went on Singulair and we were able to stop the daily treatments until ragweed season again this year. And he only needed 1 treatment a day. Now he gets a daily dose of Zyrtec and is fine...Honestly, I understand you anxiety about the medications--but you are only hurting your child if you don't give them to her. Asthma is a progressive disease and is always changing....she may need more next month and none tomorrow....Just watch her and learn from her and talk to your doctors....if they are unwilling to discuss options with you, then find one who will....

Erin - posted on 12/17/2008

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And in response to the other posts, I forgot that sometimes putting my head in the freezer or breathing over something really cold would help. A lot of times, humidity, like a steamy bathroom will make it worse, but only if you are in the middle of an attack. If your daughter does have an asthma attack just remember to TRY to stay calm and try to get her to relax an focus on breathing as much as possible. Watch the color around her lips mostly.

Erin - posted on 12/17/2008

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I have asthma and I always have (I'm 28). I'm TERRIFIED that my 2 year old son is going to end up with it as well. He also has excema, which means that his body is prone to allergies. The only advice that I can give is that I have taken Albuterol my whole life and when I was on Advair, which is an inhaled steroid, it helped alot. I know that you don't like the idea of medication, I totally understand, but it sounds like the nebulizer is a preventative measure. When I was younger, my mom would have me bow up balloons (I know a 2 y/o is a bit too young for this) and drink something like hot tea or hot chocolate. Often times you just have to figure out your child's triggers and eliminate them to the best of your ability. Obviously keep her away from cigarettes, but I know from personal experience that living near a farm was one of my major triggers. Unfortunately, it has been my experience that at least a rescue inhaler is the way to go. I have yet to hear of any other treatment for asthma, but it might be worth some research.

Hope this is helpful!

Erin

Helene - posted on 12/17/2008

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If you are using cleaning seplies stop it that is no good and also give her popcicles . And also if you here her wizsing take her in the bathroom and open the hot shower and let her bread the steam.Yes it will be hot in there that it is the best thing .My child was born with a hole in his heart and asma i refuse to give him the puffer's only gave it to him when he really really was bad and nothing help then ok and now he is 9 and still don't take it but all cleaning stuff is number 1 thing that would give anyone asma.and dust...I hope i help a bit .. Some DR.s say's they have asma cause that is how they get payed more prescription better pay for them .. Don't get me wrong not all DR.'s some of them..lol. ok bye for now

Helene.

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