My son is soon to be 7, he's been diagnosed with Mixed expressive receptive language disorder, and I'm just at a stand still. The Dr. sid his left brain is not as mature as his right, and he goes to speech, and gets extra help at school, but he's not improving as far as social and emotional skills go.

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Lisa - posted on 01/19/2009

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Hi My daughter was diagnosed with delayed expressive and receptive language disorder when she was 3. We spent a long time with speech therapy which was slow in progressing her speech. I put her through an intensive course using the Tomatis method. This is a painless and pleasant course which involves wearing headphones and listening to music whilst completing tasks. This course was like turning on a light bulb inside my daughter. Truly amazing. My daughter is now in year 1 and came second in a public speaking comp in her school. I believe our decision to undertake the course was the best thing we ever did for her. The ladies name is Kay Distell and her email address is kay@soundeducation.com.au. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Holly - posted on 01/19/2009

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I am a speech-language pathologist who has worked exclusively with kids for nearly 10 years (and a mom to a 2 1/2 year old girl). If you could provide me with a little more information about your son and what his IEP goals are, I might be able to help you work with him a little better at home. As far as social-emotional skills, these can be difficult to teach. Do any centers in your area offer social skills groups? These are groups that are strucutred in such a way to facilitate social communication and interactions for children who have deficits in this area. They use a lot of role-playing to help kids "get" the idea of sharing information, making friends, etc. That is definitely something to look into. They don't typically offer this in schools. If something like this does not exist in your area, think about how you can structure some of his play so that more direct teaching of social skills is happening. Please feel free to contact me if you want to give me more info, and I'd be happy to help! Best of luck.

Angela - posted on 01/21/2009

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I also would like to thank everyone for your response. It has been very helpful. I thought I had the only child out there with this disorder. It seems it would have been easier if he had been diagnosed with Autism or something we know more about. I'm glad I didn't put him on medication for ADHD. His pediatrician recommended that at his first visit where I was concerned. I'm very anti- drug, so I wasn't going to stop at that opinion.Again, Thank you all

Sarah - posted on 01/20/2009

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I am also a speech pathologist, and though I agree with a lot that has been said there is ont thing you have to remember.  Social/emotional skills are strongly rooted in language comprehension and expression.  Therefore, you cannot expect a child's social to exceed his or her total language age.  This is diffiuclt to deal with, espeically if a child's skills are quite delayed.  As a child's total language skills and age improve, the social aspect will also improve.  This is not to say  that social skills should not also be targeted in therapy.  Good luck with everything.

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Angela - posted on 01/21/2009

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Hi Holly,

Thank you so much for your help. His IEP does not represent the help he needs. I recently took him tho a Neurobehavioral psychologist for in depth testing. I have a 13 page report about the tests they gave Jared & how he averaged out for his age and grade.It gives the diagnoses & the recommendations.Another problem is, we go to a private school, so he only gets a half hour of speech a week one on one. The Dr. recommended an hour, and some O.T. Which he is not getting any, because the place where I would like to take him to does not accept our insurance, and the school he goes to for speech will not do O.T. for students not attending the school. In the Dr.'s report, Jared was well below level on tests measuring verbal intellectual ability. I don't know what that means. He recommended Lindamood Bell , Earobics,and Fast ForWord programs. We're just at a stand still right now, and I know it is imperitive for us to give Jared the most help we can right now, while his brain is still growing. I really appreciate your concern. Thank You Angela

Jennifer - posted on 01/21/2009

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I am not a speech therapist, but a reading specialist and some activities I do to activate both the left and right side of the brain before we begin are sessions, are called Brain Gym.  They are quick and easy and any OT can help direct you.

Angie - posted on 01/20/2009

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I just wanted to add that my son is 12 and was diagnosed with ADHD when he was just 3 and also had developmental delay. He started receiving special services when he was 3 1/2, Speech and OT, LD, etc. When he got into 5th grade he started having emotional struggles which at the time we associated with the fact that there were 3 deaths in our family all within one month of each other that truly had a profund affect on him. He would get frustrated very easily and often give up or start crying for no reason and his guilt over the smallest things, like brushing his teeth 10 minutes after I told him to. We took him to speacialists who just kept associating these struglles with ADHD and his hormones. After 2 years of changing medications and seeing Phychologists and counselors and much more I was referred by a friend to a Sub-Specialist in my area who specializes in Autistic Spectrum Disorder, Asperger's Syndrome, etc and finally we have a diagnosis that makes sense and we also found that the medications his "specialists" kept adding to, etc was actually for that of an 18 year old and not a 12 year old. My son is now having irregular heartbeats and needs to be monitored. The reason I tell you this is because your son may have Autistic Spectrum Disorder and because there is such a large umbrella under this disorder, you may want to find a specialist in your area that can help lead you in the right direction. I am so glad that I did!! I am in Will County in Illinois but please, if you can check out his web site. I have found so much helpful info and tips on this web site. http://www.fbhchicago.com/

Veronica - posted on 01/20/2009

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Have you considered going to a natural path doctor, I am studing Natural nutrition and we just finished a course on mental health and many studies have been done where the the right nutrition helped tremendously, and some times reversed some cases, please consider this before considering putting your child on medication which many have horrible side effect and usually cause the symptoms to worsed and are only a temperary blanket to cover the problem and and deal with the root cause.



 



good luck

Kim - posted on 01/20/2009

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I'm not a medical doctor or speach therpist but I do have a step-son who is PDD Autistic and a 3yr old. Both of them are in love with Thomas the train. The HIT Enternaiment website with the Thomas games and videos are wonderful. They teach emotions and facial expression without the kid notising. My step-son is 17 and I believe that he has gotten at least something from playing the games.

Alexis - posted on 01/19/2009

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My son is 6yr old and is a twin. His brother has always been way ahead of him, which is difficult. He has been in speech therapy since he was 3. The therapist has said he has a articulation delay, and struggles with both expressive/receptive language. I know how frustrating the progress can seem. But the way it seems to go with my son is, when he starts to understand new words, it takes us a month or so to understand them. Just keep reading to him. Have him slow down when he talks, my son gets in such a rush when he talks. And now you are not alone.

Holly - posted on 01/19/2009

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Mixed Expressive/Receptive means that the child has both a delay with what he can say (expressive) and what he can understand (receptive). I would not worry all that much about a child who is two and is not yet talking. Does he understand what is said to him? Does he point or gesture to communicate? Does he say anything at all? If he is two and not saying ANY words, or seems to lack understanding, then I would tell his parents to have him evaluated by the state's early intervention program. It is free of charge (in most states) to have him evaluated, and then treatment is free and in the home. (I do part-time early intervention in the homes and have done so for over 5 years now). Have them ask his pediatrician for the referral. Hope this helps!

Maggie - posted on 01/19/2009

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what does that mean? I ask because I am worried about my nephew who is 2 and still doesn't talk.

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