Our 21 month old has red flags of autism

Nina - posted on 07/20/2013 ( 210 moms have responded )

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Our World turned upside down when we noticed our 21 month old having many red flags of autism. We never thought about it until the daycare he goes to, pointed out that he is different than other toddlers of his age. He does not wave bye bye, does not point at objects and does not clap (used to clap and wave bye bye when he was 18 months), loves to do same things over and over again, loves stacking blocks and usually will stack same color blocks together, is not saying more than 1-2 words like babbling, screams a lot and likes to pinch/scratch others. He gets very excited on going outdoors and specially in crowded areas. We have an ECI assessment scheduled for next week but we are struggling as this is our first child and do not what to do. Looking for tips and guidance from other moms out there who have been through this. Anything else we can do before his assessment? feel so helpless..

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Danielle - posted on 07/22/2013

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Our oldest is Autistic.
He is 5 years old and was diagnosed at 3.5. He falls on the cusp of Moderate to Severe ASD.
I don't know what to say exactly when someone new joins the Autism parent club. I think to say congratulations would be a little inappropriate.
What I can tell you is that you are not alone. Take the time to breathe, and remember that although your child doesn't fit into the definition of typical child that he is still that same beautiful person.
The diagnostic process is a stressful time for a lot of parents and families.
Take the time to pull yourself away from the books, the computer and possible therapy techniques. Don't beat yourself up if you take a step back, and not have Autism research be a focus in your immediate day.
Remember that the grass isn't always greener on the other side. Try not to compare your child to other children.. it will not benefit anyone.
Don't be afraid to put people in their place. With a special needs child, especially with Autism, there will be people who will overstep their boundaries. Everyone will feel it is their place to tell you what you could possibly be doing wrong to correct the symptoms. People may stare in public. Be your sons advocate. Autism make people different, not less!
Take the time to appreciate the milestones he is meeting, not to focus to much on the ones he isn't. Constantly thinking of the unmet milestones can be daunting, and may feel hopeless.
Remember that this isn't forever. This is just right now. Take it one day at a time, and allow yourselves to be emotional about the changes that will happen in your life. Holding it in will create resentment, and your son needs his parents to accept him.
Don't forget that sometimes he can't help his behaviours.

I hope I am not overstepping my boundaries. These are all things that it has taken quite along time for myself to understand, and I often still need to remind myself.
Just remember that you are not alone!!

Leisl - posted on 07/23/2013

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I will never forget hearing that diagnosis, which was really just a confirmation of my own research. Everyone else in my life was blowing off the red flags, but I knew something was wrong. I noticed regressions in speech and behavior, and particularly the sensory issues were alarming. Crowds, which had previously not been a problem, were now terrifying to my child. We had to change churches even because our then church had a band that played drums loudly, and used whistles indoors during children's activities. My husband and I cried. Alot. We also prayed. Alot. And then, step by step, we were led to the right people and places. Wonderful occupational therapists who helped our child develop in the areas in which he was struggling. A smaller church with Sunday School teachers who LOVED on our child and never treated him differently. Over time, the sensory issues declined. We made the decision to homeschool which was the best decision we have EVER made. It allowed our son to learn at his own pace, without the distractions of the regular classroom, or the hindrances of it. He is close to his siblings and confident in what he believes. We connected with friends and others who never made his struggles an issue, but received him as the wonderful, kind and very thoughtful child he was. Now, he is 17 years old and on his own path of learning and growing into a wonderful, caring, thoughtful young man. He has his own passions and interests which seem to be taking him places I probably would never have imagined, but am thrilled to see. Don't let anyone discourage you from following your heart for your child. Especially as you watch for his strengths and help him to develop those. YOUR LOVE and peace will matter more than anything else to him. Praying for you right now!

Angela - posted on 09/27/2013

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Hello there,
I am a mother of three boys and I am an educator of 13 years. I have worked with many children with sensory processing disorders, Asperger's and autism throughout my career. Nothing could have prepared me for my third child who is definitely different from other children. Taking these early steps like you are doing with your child is important and will help you understand how to work with your child and be successful. My son has been diagnosed with sensory processing and delayed development. We have found many benefits in getting him occupational therapy. This gave us a lot of information on how to deal with his many quarks that he has. I encourage you to start this early and enroll in as many programs that you can that will help you in your quest to help your child be successful. Last year I had the most wonderful little boy in my classroom that was autistic. I could not believe how well rounded he was and how his mother was the best resource that I had ever had. He is a very successful student, plays sports, and even was the highlight of our school talent show last year. This is in fact due to all the hard work that his mother had done, and how she advocated for him growing up. I encourage you to become involved and embrace this person you have brought into this world.

Emma - posted on 07/26/2013

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Ignore all the people babbling on about vaccinations causing autism. There is no proof. Full stop. Individual anecdotes are not proof. Just focus on getting your child the best help as early as u can. The autism spectrum is very broad and your child may essentially function normally.

Laurie - posted on 07/23/2013

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Hi, my first child was also not (normal) i had nowhere to turn. Pediatricians seemed oblivious to my concerns. So i turned to my intuition and much prayer for wisdom. My son did not play with other children nor did he play, he collected items and lined then up or took apart toys but he never played. He didnt look at the animals at zoos nor participate in things that i tried to show him. He did not like certain noises, nor looking at certain things..... like a noisy battery operated toy or a baby doll or toy that had eyes that glared at him, i would have to put them away. He didnt talk intellible words and sentences till he turned 3, then the next morning he woke up and asked for a bowl of cereal, i bout fell out! But let me say,that just because he was different or disadvantaged, i felt compelled to treat him normally and expect from him what i would expect from any child. He was challenging to say the least and exhausting, i cried myself to sleep most nights because he seemed to hate me...... i realized he was angry because i would not allow him to stay in his shell and surround himself on in what made him comfortable. He didnt want to be hugged...i huggged him, he didnt want his hair brushed.....i brushed it.....he didnt want to be with other kids ....i made him be with other kids and i disciplined him if he hurt other kids..... its not acceptable behaviour. But if i had yielded to him and let him be comfortable, my son would not be as high functioning and well developed socially as he is. I look back at all the struggles and tears and realize it was well worth it all to see him now. Oh he still has issues and limitations but he has far exceeded anything i could imagine. Every child reguardless of limitations needs the same things to thrive, some just take much more time, and energy. Your son needs you to be a rock and to know that your willing to give him what he needs not what he wants even if he gets angry at you. No one can do this but his parents, the ones who love him and have a vested interest in who he will become. Look on the internet for a story about Carly Fleischmann. She is an autistic girl who found a way to communicate, and in doing this has let the world in on why she does what she does. It will no doubt help many parents of autistic children to help them. It can be a time of grieving for a parent when they realize their child might not be average, but it also opens a doorway to stretch you for the good of yourself and for others. Praying for you.

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Caroline - posted on 03/15/2015

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The best book is engaging. Autism. By green as pan the only bookyou will need to.read the first. Two chapters and ypu. Will know and any one that do doubts you give them the book

Erin - posted on 10/07/2013

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There is a program in every state that will evaluate your child and decide if they qualify for therapy its a different name in each state. for MO its called first steps. Both of my boys have fragile-x-syndrome (similar to autism)
Do some research of the laws of children with special needs and the schools or whatever. My parents are advocates for parents with children with special needs they give information to people to help them prepare for things like that I think you should give them a call! I think they could help you! I am the oldest of 4 and all 3 of my younger siblings have fragile-x-syndrome and autism (along with some other disabilities) Tim 816 739 2503 Angela 816 461 3577

Rivka - posted on 10/06/2013

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In Israel we get a bit of financial help from our "social security - Bituach Leumi". All citizens are insured with health insurance and all children diagnosed with a form of autism are supposed to get free therapy till the age of 18.
Find out how and where you are insured.
Therapy like ABA is very expensive and time consuming. You need a lot of staff that specialize in it and helpers. Find out whom in your community can help out in the therapy of your choice.
"Option" or "Mifne" work on the same way. Hard concentrated work with the child for a certain period of time. Then training parents and staff for further care when child is integrated into the regular daycare. Very expensive. They claim to cure the children (Mifne say that they improve the child not cure).
Floor time - Greenspan theory. you need to work hard and work as a team with your spouse. Make sure you find another helper or someone to do household chores.

The key to all these therapies is : Early intervention and a support group.

Rivka - posted on 10/05/2013

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Hi I'm a Mom of 8.
My 11 year old showed many signs early on. From birth. I know that medically it should only show up at 3 months but there were issues before.
I'm talking about his development was different from other children.
I'm a NICU RN and an early child development Educator.
I was always worried. pushed my pediatrician to get us into the process of diagnosis.
He needed lots of touch. So, we went to physiotherapy because he was low tone and later on clumsy, OT to strengthen his gros and small motor, get into playing. Speech therapy because he spoke with words and crying. once in a blue moon we would hear him speak a full sentence. Sort of got stuck on each stage of speech development.
I cut down my shift work and stayed home with him until he was 10 months old. I took in two more children to make sure I worked with him all day and didn't get tempted to do house work.
I basically used the Greenspan theory of floor time.
Only when he repeated Kindergarten did we get a clear diagnosis. The pediatrician kept on telling me that I shouldn't worry because my child is getting the care he needs even without a diagnosis.
I was constantly asked by the special Ed staff at the kindergarten for the speech delayed, how to get my son working.
So, I got into the habit to watch child development programs.
There was a sensory diet program.
I spoke to the OT she ran a sensory profile. from there the diagnosis was fast.
Today my son is in a class for highly functioning PDD in a regular school. They are integrated into a regular class during the week according to each ones ability.
Any Q's you can ask me any time.

Heather - posted on 10/05/2013

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As an educator, I've seen many children, all develop differently. I'm going to make this short. Diagnosed or not, if you take him to OT they can work on the skills he needs and your concerns that can help him better develop certain areas of growth and development. Then don't hide these things from his teachers, rather tell them what you are working on at OT, so they can work on those skills also, and it helps the teacher, too because OT can tell them what works for your child.

User - posted on 10/04/2013

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Start with Mighty Oak Family consultants if you get a diagnosis or just need some advice from parents/ educators who have been through the process. They are a wealth of knowledge and support. They are there to help people in your exact position! Miriah & John are amazing!

Dee - posted on 10/04/2013

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The first thing to note, that getting help early is the key. If your child has autism, it isn't the end of the world. It is shocking and it sad, but use that energy for determination. My son was not diagnosed with aspergers until he was 8. We started experiencing problems with his behavior at the age of 4, when we moved from FL to MN. He was enrolled in a day treatment program for over two months - they did an evaluation for autism, but not all the signs were apparent. We enrolled him into an afternoon therapeutic preschool until he was 7. He struggled some during the next year, but when he entered 2nd grade, this was the year when he had many struggles. He was in crisis for the whole month of November - 3 trips to the emergency room with the last one ending up with an overnight stay in the pediatric psych hospital. When I meet with the psychologist, he immediately told me he had aspegers and when he went through some of the characteristics, the missing pieces where finally found. He spent another 6 weeks in a day treatment program. They were able to evaluate meds and offer advice specialized to him. From here, I was able to get him enrolled in a level 5 school. This has been life changing. Unfortunately, my son could not, at the time, handle conventional school. Since enrolling him in the special school, he has blossomed so much and has learned to live in our world as I learn about his wold to make the path less bumpy for him. This year, hopefully, he will start the transition to mainstream school. He is a happy little boy! Many, even a recent trip to the peds office, were impressed with how well he was doing. The hardest part for me, was having to put him on medication. He is on 5, but if he wasn't on these meds, he would be institutionalize. Hopefully as he grows we will be able to gently take him off some of these meds, but they are giving him a good quality life. The initial shock is the worse and you will have some crashing of your own feelings at time. If you need help, don't be afraid to seek it. And never for get to take care of yourself and your marriage. My marriage feel apart - not just because of this, but this added to what was already crumbling.
I also recommend, at some point in your journey, to learn about Temple Grandin - she will inspire.

Lanae - posted on 09/27/2013

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My son has autism. The most helpful things for us have been biomedical treatment and ABA therapy. We moved to a state where insurance is required to cover autism treatments like ABA. We also see a naturalpath (I know, I was skeptical too) who helps us know what foods to avoid (based on blood tests) and what nutrients can help him. I give him 5 different vitamins each day and MB12 shots too. Autism is very much a physical/neurological condition and your regular pediatrician is not going to help you with all this stuff. 10% of all kids "recover". It's going to hurt you every day. Remember that our Heavenly Father only gives special children to special people. You can do this!
PS. I found our doctor on Generation Rescue.

Dawn - posted on 09/27/2013

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Look up Dr. Mila McManus in The Woodlands @ website: http://www.woodlandswellnessmd.com/ .She is an M.D. but now owns and runs a Health Institute focused on healing through nutrition and supplements. My own mom is seeing her for overall health issues in the next week...and a woman who works with her had a son with severe eczema and now the whole family is healed from that which is an autoimmune disease, as well as other issues they had.

I realize autism is very different than that but you should at the very least call her office and speak to her nurse/assistant. I think she has some information on who to call for testing your child for environmental toxins, as well as some other important related information. Good Luck to you.

Tanyel - posted on 09/27/2013

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Yep early intervention is key my son is 14 has held a summer job catching the bus from the east side of town to the west is playing football an winning. Still has some support classes but alot if regular classes an doin well he had speech therapy an psychologist help within school thats whats important. Dont be afraid to discourage negative behaviors an embrace positive ones. Sheesh for ur own peace of mind you'll ne ok

[deleted account]

Nina,
I recommend watching the movie "Son Rise". It's a true story about a boy with autism.
It may help you .

Terry

Jadee - posted on 09/26/2013

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Hi Nina, I guess by now you know your diagnosis and may have started treatments already. My aunt lives in the Houston area and raised a son with autism (my cousin). She was a SAHM at the time but began educating herself and eventually got a master's degree in special education. I think early intervention is key -- there are good programs in Houston, and my cousin is now in his 20's and has gone to college. Anyway if you'd like to meet my aunt, you can private message me, and I'll send her your info. It might be helpful to have a friend in the area who has gone through all of this.

Deepshikha - posted on 09/23/2013

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Plz give me the ans of this post because my son has the same problem.

Chassity - posted on 08/13/2013

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My son is 30 months is currently in speech therapy bc he barely says 7 words he is currently in OT also bc he is very hyper just constantly on the go wont set for long at all. He doesn't like to play with paint or anything that feels gooey. He seems at times to not hear you I can say his name two or three times suometimes before he looks at me. Hes already had a hearing test an did fine. And very reluctant to follow direction. He just seems very different than other kids his behavior is often bad not listening an throwing little tantrums he also has no interest in toys he much rather play on ipad or watch his favorite movies. He also has a high tolerance for pain hes ben biting himself lately and very mean toward other kids. He will acknowledge other children but less interested very quickly. Just some of the expressions and hand gestures seem strange to me and the tensing up of his body. He also doesn't seem to b afraid of anything hell climb as high as he can . He also does sum hand flappin and swaying but not all the time but his 18 month old brother seems to b on the exact same track but he seems to play better but he does hand flapping a lot specially when upset. my ped said he wants him to see a developmental ped so im just trying to get a heads up of what I may hear any comments I would really appreciate

Danielle - posted on 08/02/2013

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Nina,
In my experience I would not start any therapies. We have therapist in our home, and he also receives therapies in school. We were lucky that a good handful of his therapist and aids will be following him through home and school therapies. The areas of development where we have different therapist they have to coordinate whats being addressed.
I would take the month to research Autism, research different therapy techniques, and join an Autism support group. I completely understand the anxiety and wanting to "hit the ground running" approach, but at this time I think you'd benefit more with pacing yourself. It is only a month, and you can start implementing certain speech therapies, and whatnot yourself. To hire therapist outright can be extremely expensive... over $130 an hour (at least in Canada). Once your son has a diagnosis then you can see if you can receive government subsidy to help assist in any additional costs.

As for the ABA, you must do what you feel is necessary. I stay home with my son, because at the time I was ready to go back to work he was head banging, and would scream and curl up in a little ball whenever anyone would say "hi" to him. He wasn't talking and has moderate/severe behavioural issues.. not hitting or anything, but he would hide in his closet, or refused to wear clothes,ect.
Depending on where you feel your son fits on the spectrum it may be more beneficial for him to continue daycare where he can be exposed to other typically developing children. My son is now 5, and in Kindergarten. He still has his behavioural issues, but he's at an imitation point when having him around other children he is starting to notice socialization, and trying to mimic the other children on how to play. It has also helped his language development.
Ideally, I would recommend trying to mainstream. The younger your child is when he's enrolled will help create bonds with other neurotypical children. These bonds will strengthen and will help him make friends. At this age, children don't notice to much when someone is different. In my situation, they accept my son is different, but they are all still eager to try and include him. As he progresses into school, I am hopeful that these children will become his allies, and friends.
Also, in terms of the medication, I would inquire with a doctor. With so many sensory issues that come with Autism it wouldn't hurt to ask. If he has a bad experiance, it may create a bad memory relationship to the doctors and it will be a struggle to take him back. Does he usually have issues with people touching him? In any case, If it were me, I'd probably request some sort of sedation for the tubes.

Hope I can be of help.
If you have any questions feel free to PM me.

Nina - posted on 08/01/2013

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Thanks a lot to all you wonderful people for the information, support and positive views. A lot of things have been going on with our little boy since my post. We had his hearing test done a couple of weeks ago and found out that he has fluid behind his ear drums. The ENT doctor said that it may be affecting his hearing but only mildly like whispers etc. He recommended Prednisolone drops in both ears for 5 days and Fluticasone nasal spray and a re-test 4 weeks after the medications following which , if he still shows fluid in ear, then he suggested tubes in both ears. But he also said that his signs other than speech like hand flapping, repititive activities and routines and not waving bye or clapping/pointing at objects concern him and he recommended to schedule an appointment with a development pediatrician for a diagnosis of Autism. Also, we had his ECI assessment done yesterday which showed that he is lagging behind in communication (70% delay) and cognition (30% delay). They also recommended an appointment with Psychologist or developmental Pediatrician. But the ECI services and frequency will only be known by next month (september). We got an appointment with Dr Dan Williamson, a develpmental Pediatrician who diagnoses Autism for August 8. Now, with our situation, we are worried about the following:

1. With his ECI services not starting atleast until next month, should we get him started on private speech /Occupational therapy? Will that conflict with ECI services?

2. At this time, he is going to a Montessori School. But we are looking at ABA centers for his treatment but neither mine or my husband's insurance (both of us work full time) covers ABA as they consider it educational and not medicinal. The ABA treatment is 45$/hr and if he needs 30-40 hours/week, we will not be able to afford it without insurance, Would it make sense for me to quit my job and take classes for ABA and work with my son?

3. With his impending Autism diagnosis, should we give him steroids like Prednisolone and if needed, general anesthesia for tube surgery for his ears.

4. Can anyone recommend a good DAN doctor in Sugar Land or Houston, Texas area?

thanks a lot for all your help and support. We are from India and do not have any family or friends in US , so our only support system is the internet and all you wonderful people.

Dang Thi Tuyet - posted on 07/31/2013

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You are very lucky to have discovered this so early. Early intervention will be a major benefit to your child's development.

Get prepared to do a lot of research in your spare time. Any appointments, attempt to get them scheduled asap as there will often be a 2 to four month wait list. Here is what I would suggest:

Start applying play therapy - devote all of your spare time (both you and your wife, and any other family members or close friends that will be involved in your child's life routinely) - for this I would recommend Floortime, six developmental milestones; Here is a URL:
http://www.floortime.org/dirFloortime/ov...

Join community based groups of parents of children with special needs. One in particular I have found very helpful is MyAutismTeam
http://www.myautismteam.com/
You can use this to find many local useful resources.
Other most helpful community based organizations are CARD (Center for Autism and Related Disorders) and PHP (Parents Helping Parents) - one or both of these may have organizations in close proximity to you.

Easter Seals may have an office near you - they may be able to perform several vasious assessments (for example, audiology, vision testing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy assessments, etc), Also standard autism diagnosis such as the ADOS 2 (you will benefit from having this particular assessment done - if not at easter seals, search for reputable child psychologist)

Try to find a primary pediatrician who is most experienced and reputable for working with children with special needs. We found ours by word of mouth from our counselor at Easter Seals.

Your pediatrician is likely affiliated with some particular neurologist, possibly BioMedical doctor and can give referrals to them, or you could discover these at the aforementioned website.
A doctor who uses BioMedical approach, is critical, according to our experience. These used to be called DAN doctors, though that certification was never closely regulated so may be difficult to find by using that acronym anymore. Perhaps try searching for "doctor autism biomedical" or something similar. Read within forums to assess his reputation (there were some phonies using the DAN tag). Biomedical therapies include dietary changes, dietary supplementation based on blood work (deificiencies or surpluses of various substances discovered in a blood sample), and can become more high tech (chelation if heavy metal contamination for example, HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) for its accelerted healing, etc. Do not be discouraged by persons (including psychologists) from traditional medical fields who discount the efforts of doctors who use the biomedical approach - their opinions may be conflicting, but you will need to research and be the master of your decisions.

ABA therapy pays biggest dividends the earliest you start, and seems to be perhaps the most popular therapy amongst parents of children with autism. Of course finding the right provider (most reputable, and works with whatever type of insurance you have) may require a lot of time.

Take some type of behavior course (for parents to develop their child's behavior) - these are most helpful for any family, and definitely work for families with children with special needs as well. There will be some offered through CARD (mentioned above), and you could find others through behavioral therapy providers.

Most importantly is not to allow yourself to be overwhelmed / saddened by this discovery, and to devote your heart and time as much as possible to your child - your child needs your continuous attention and interaction - give him confidence and reward all of his smallest of accomplishments, and he can/will overcome his social and communicative deficits. Keep a clear head, positive attitude. Try never to show negative feelings / emotions in front of your child. You will learn quickly as you progress through this and your bond with your child will increase one thousand fold and the most rewarding moments of your lifetime will result from these trials.

Best of luck to you,

Laurie - posted on 07/28/2013

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Joyce i absolutely agree with you, that has been my experience with the public school system. And i understand why they enforce that ...... a bunch of kids....lots of germs.....spreading disease. I mean it makes sense to vaccinate in that situation. Have you ever wondered....... if families were self sustaining farmers again, children were home schooled and had minimal contact with large groups of children (like they do in public school) what would the rate of contamination from diseases per child per family be without vaccinations? There will always be disease on this earth, but by our societal lifestyles do we proliferate it to the point of needing vaccines? I am not for or against vaccines. I suspect though that vaccines do help more than hurt. Even if our society reverted back to self sustained farming and children had limited contact with great numbers of children to avoid infection of disease without vaccines, then a parent could get infected and carry it back to their family. How many of their children would die?

Laurie - posted on 07/28/2013

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Genetics are incredibly overwhelming to me. Alcohol abuse is entrenched in my family and my husbands family. It is very curious. How much is genetics versus whats caught and whats taught in the home between parents and children? I always think to my own childhood, when i finally grew up and left, i was my parents. I did not even know how to form my own opinions, i blindly believed what my parents believed and responded the same as my parents did. It was all i knew. So is alcoholism genetic or taught behavior? It is complex, with no easy answers. We know of fetal alcohol syndrome. I can not help but think that
There is definatley a genetic component involved. Call me crazy but sometimes i think that the genetics of mankind are played out, or the industrial revolution, introduction of petroleum: plastics, are in everything and everywhere. How do these changes affect us? Pryor, we were all simple farmers, providing our own needs, self sustaining. Thats all changed as well. We rely on corporations to provide everything. But would those facts tamper with our genetics? Now .... to find evidence that supports any of my theories lol!

Mary Grace - posted on 07/28/2013

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Hope you alerted the pediatrician. Begin early intervention asap! It will make a big difference and there is always always hope he will improve over time and you will adjust too. You and hubby need to stay hooked tight throughout in order to give yoir son security and stability. Stay calm, as autistic children are sensitive to business and noise and the moods of those aroind them.. Be patient with him and positive. If you have faith in God, then pray for your son and you and husband,,every day!

Google Autism support groups in your area join one and ask them for the best Ped. for autism.

I have two children on the spectrum...it makes me love them even more deeply. LOVE HIM and advocate for him. Peace be with you and your family!

Laurie - posted on 07/28/2013

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Wow....... i have to think about this. I have the feeling, knowing people and government institutions, that they "know", i suspect that they believe it is better that you don't know, because then they can lead you to believe that it's mandatory. It's just easier for the government if everyone gets their vaccines. It's like everything else in the government, one size fits all, don't rock the boat ! And no , i do not fall for conspiracy theories lol! But i do realize that the government is not very flexible. Reminds me when i wanted to home school my children, the teachers were against it,very negative about it. I did any way, but i found out that the public school teachers were being told lies about home schooling, and they believed that children would suffer as a result. But now the studies and statistics are in and the results are in favor of home schooling..... but of course there are some really bad examples of home schoolers out there that taint the good ones, but the government will only focus on the bad. Lol! Am i making any sense or did i really chase that rabbit?

Marilyn - posted on 07/28/2013

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Laurie, your post about genetics reminds me of something I heard: that frequently, the grandchildren & great-grandchildren of alcoholics have autism. I don't know if that's ever been researched, but my grandfather was indeed an alcoholic and two of my brothers are autistic, one of my nephews, and my son.

The post I saw about dairy and gluten: My brother took his autistic son off dairy and gluten & after it was thoroughly flushed from his system (about 2 months) there was a night & day difference in his behavior. He's still a bit "odd" and you can tell something's different there, but it's not terrible like it had been.

Joyce - posted on 07/28/2013

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Do your research. Many times it turns out to be food allergies or intolerances. i.e. intolerance to wheat, dairy or both which could have developed. MD's may deny this.
Try going gluten free and/or dairy free diet.
Joyce G.

Joyce - posted on 07/28/2013

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@LaurieLaird. I was a teacher for abt 20 yrs and I taught all over the US, having followed my husband's career. We relo'd 18 times, so I've seen school systems all over. I have never seen any school system where any child could enter public school or private w/o record of proper vaccinations. Now, homechooling...do whatcha want...

Carla - posted on 07/28/2013

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I think it's also important to remember the side effects of the diseases these vaccines protect us from. Some of these diseases which have been pretty much eradicated can cause blindness, deafness and brain damage.

Mari - posted on 07/28/2013

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Great link Carmen , the thinking moms link, that's one every person should read.

Kacey - posted on 07/28/2013

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as a mom with 3 special needs kids may i 1st say its going to be ok even though it doesnt feel like it right now. my 1st 2 kids my husband and i were lucky enough to adopt by becoming foster to adopt parents. we got our babies as babies and only a week apart. we knew they were drug and acohol effected but we wouldnt know to much later what else if anything. my son was much more delayed than my daughter who was ahead of everyone her age and still kinda is. at 3 they started early education and thats when a wonder woman at my kids school gave me a magazine with an story she wanted me to read. she said i swear i though i was reading this about your son and added please dont be offended. i read it and wow yeah sounds like my son... this chil had autism. that began our journey and fight. the school district refused to test him and here you have to have the school to test and say he does in order to get the services they need. i fought and won and then 3 yrs later i fought again and won again. he at home gets speech and ot and basic skills and psr that come to our home, he has an iep at school as well. yes its not easy but its not so bad. u will adjust and your routine will seem normal and no big deal after awhile. he may have delays or differences but hey that can be great. my son is an amazing artist... disney bought my sons 1st drawing he ever did... and i mean ever did. 3 yrs old sat down at my desk at work and drew minnie mouse in about 20 mins and handed it to me.... he couldnt stay in the lines to color in a book but yet he drew an amazing 3d minnie. he struggles with math and reading but hes doing it slowly. my son crawled at 11mos walked at 16mo, didnt potty train til almost 3 and night trained almost 6.but thats ok cuz he did it. oh and my son can tell you every single president in order as well as their birthday, date of death if dead, and was visited by the fbi at 6 yrs old for googling the treasury too much. he likes money and can draw it exactly like it looks with even the little hairs they added through out. you child may have and up hill battle but i can tell you i love my little boy, whos now 11 and starting 6th grade, how he is and while sometimes i ask myself when will we catch a break or i know he knows this... i look at all the art and that smile and i know its i can do this. by the way my other 11 yr old she oppistional definate and hard to handle but straight a student and amazing at math and writing... and my baby 16mos old which miracle that i the doctors found her inside me and i was 5 mos along with no idea... went to take out the gallbladder found a baby..she was born with down syndrome but with very small delays compared to typical babies she a few months behind on walking by herself thats it. so having a special needs baby isnt so bad and he might surprise u and end up with being high fuctioning or maybe hes just decided i dont want to do that wave clap thing. my baby can say lots of words like mama but prefers to sign mama but will say dada and sign it too all day long so either way i hope this helps u to see it will be ok. 1 day at a time.

Mari - posted on 07/28/2013

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Laurie, Schools don't tell you, they have an affidavit on file, where you sign off that based on personal beliefs, you're children will not be vaccinated. Maybe that long ago, the individual schools probably didn't even necessarily know parents had options. The dr I spoke to said he had to write up the form himself when his children went to school.

I went thru the majority of the series before knowing this stuff, come kindergarten, I'll be requesting that form because I'm not re-inoculating the mmr so my children's chances of avoiding it go from 95% to 99% while the potential risk of the injection involves their mental health.

Carmen - posted on 07/27/2013

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There's always been an option to opt out of vaccines. Many people are allergic to the ingredients in vaccines and could go into anaphylactic shock if given one.

Laurie - posted on 07/27/2013

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When my children were little they could not attend kindergarten without vaccines. I guess things have changed in 24 yrs.

Emma - posted on 07/26/2013

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Vaccination is about keeping the community healthy, not just your own kids. If too many people don't vaccinate, the protection of herd immunity does not work.
Do u want a return to polio outbreaks killing and permanently disabling kids?
I wasn't vaccinated as a child and I feel bad now about all the people I exposed to infection when I had rubella, chicken pox and measles. Imagine if there's a child out there deaf and blind because I had rubella and sat next to their mum on the bus to the doctors.

Carmen - posted on 07/26/2013

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What vaccines did they have? I'm wondering if any totally unvaccinated children have been studied. I'm guessing not because, everyone believes the lie that your child can't attend school without being vaccinated.

Mari - posted on 07/26/2013

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I agree Laurie, the option should be left to the parent, a disclosure should accompany vaccines about remote possibilities. Then one may choose to simply wait, and do the dr sears program, or forego altogether, one mom here commented on how her sibling deteriorated and therefore chose NOT to vaccinate her own and her children are apparently healthy. No doubt genetics are a major component, or all kids would be affected. I totally agree on your theory, they sacrifice a few for the majority.

Mausami - posted on 07/26/2013

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As parents just relax and accept whatever the news is.your child needs your help now.overcome ur fears later

Laurie - posted on 07/26/2013

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My husband and i met in high school, he was a little different than most boys i had known, but i thought it was refreshing. At the time i knew nothing about high functioning autism. He functioned very well, was very confident and didnt let anything stop him, so i chalked it up to the quirks as being part of his personality, i married him. 3 yrs. Later, i had my first child a little boy and he was not typical. I knew something was not right but my husband shut me down and would not discuss it nor help me pursue specialists. Now 24 years later, i see it as plain as day, my husband and son are very similar, my son being more severe than my husband in his symptoms by far. So i know it has genetic components. I have read on sites that usually there is a peculiar family member or "eccentric" , reported by the parents of autistic children, or the father himself exhibits tendencies of autism.

Aleks - posted on 07/26/2013

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Get his ears and hearing tested! I've read of instances that kids with ear problems (especially when this young) may present with some of the symptoms frequently mistaken for autism.

Rebecca - posted on 07/26/2013

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I know all of the supposed reasons that vaccines cause autism. When my daughter was diagnosed, we went out of state to the University of Missouri's Autism Center. They ran tests on every thing we asked them to -- including anything that would link my daughter's autism to vaccines. None of them came out positive. I'm convinced, at least for my child, it wasn't vaccine-related.

Karen - posted on 07/26/2013

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I do not have an unvaccinated child with autism - but I have several friends whose children did not have vaccines (or at least the ones that are considered the major culprits) and they have autism.

Nancy - posted on 07/26/2013

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My son had green vaccines and, it made no difference. We had chromosomal testing done on him at Monifore Medical Center in NYC and, came to find out that he has a chromsonal deletion (chromosome 17) which they are finding is very common with people whom have autism.

Carmen - posted on 07/26/2013

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I wonder if there's ever been a study of unvaccinated children being diagnosed with autism? Even anecdotal evidence will do at this point. Anyone out there that has an unvaccinated child with autism? Anyone?

Nancy - posted on 07/26/2013

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My son has autism. He was diagnosed at 2 years old, he is now 6. It was very difficult at first but, there is so much help to be offered to get him to the best place possible. ABA...applied behavior analyisis has been most helpful. Also...never forget you have any army of parents like me who will help you through this and, share both your tears and, joy this journey.

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