Pumping and not breastfeeding?

Crystal - posted on 01/26/2010 ( 13 moms have responded )

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Just wondering what are some of the pros and cons of Pumping and not doing the full breastfeeding?

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[deleted account]

you absolutely do not have to put a baby to breast once a day to keep up supply, you just need to remove milk from the breast regularly.



you do not have to pump multiple times during the night. i kept my supply up by pumping at midnight and the again at 6am. in order to keep your supply you should not go longer than this between pumps or your supply will start to drop. i pumped every three hours for several weeks and then slowly shifted to the midnight - 6am schedule.



mommy bonding better with baby & baby bonding better with mommy because of breastfeeding is nonsense. are people seriously saying that i don't love my children as much if i don't put them on my boob? or vise versa? how much mommies & children love each has nothing to do with mommy's nipple! this is bs propaganda used to steer worried new mommies towards breastfeeding.



i have done all the options with my kids, formula only, breast milk (pumped) for a small chunk of time & formula for the rest, breast milk for a year (pumped), and exclusively breast feeding (actually on the boob). it's all just feeding. millions of people survived and are just fine having only ever had formula so don't feel guilty for whatever you decide to do.



the worst part of pumping for me was finding a private place to pump. oh & invest in a pumping bra of some kind. i used a plain bra and put button holes in it for the flanges to go through, my fave has been a sports bra.

Candice - posted on 01/26/2010

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Pros:

Dad and others can help with feedings so more sleep for Mom.



If Mom is able to pump a little extra and store it, she could take a longer time away (weekend 'vacation', go to work, etc.) from Baby if she wanted.



Pumping can empty breasts faster than Baby, especially if Baby tends to fall asleep while feeding. Including prep and clean up, I was done after 20 minutes and would express an average of 16 oz every 3 - 4 hours. (We had twins, so I needed a lot of milk!)



If Baby doesn't latch right away, Mom may be less likely to switch to formula due to frustrations of Baby and Mom. This was our biggest issue. We tried EVERYTHING to get our DD and twin DSs to latch w/o success!



When Baby gets teeth, Mom doesn't get bit while feeding.



If Mom can express enough milk and freeze it, she could stop pumping and still have enough stored to feed Baby to whatever age she wanted to switch Baby to cow's milk. I wanted to give the twins breast milk until they were 1. Because of the milk I 'overexpressed' and stored, I was able to stop pumping when my twins were 10 months old and have enough to make it until they turned 1.



Cons:

Some people believe that Mom doesn't form as strong of a bond with Baby, but I don't believe it a bit!



If Mom's pumping schedule doesn't coincide with Baby's nighttime feeding schedule, Mom may end up getting less sleep. This wasn't a huge problem for me, but there were nights when the schedules didn't mesh.



Some Moms have sore nipple problems with pumping. I found that if I used Lanolin after each pumping I had minimal issues with sore nipples. I preferred Lansinoh over Medela. The Lansinoh brand is thicker.



Overall, pumping and then bottle feeding worked very well for us! Good luck to you with whatever feeding decisions you make!

Sylvia - posted on 01/26/2010

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Well, let's see.



Pros: The baby still gets human milk instead of cow's milk.



Cons: You have to pump 8-12 times a day (and that means a couple of times during the night, too); you have to buy bottles, nipples, and a really good breast pump; you have to wash bottles and the nipples and the pump parts; you may find you end up spending more time with the breast pump than with the baby; even if you co-sleep, you still have to get up and prepare a bottle when the baby needs to eat at night; because pumps are much less efficient than babies at emptying the breast, it can be very hard to maintain your supply; you have to bring bottles and a cooler pack with you everywhere you go; if you travel, you have to take the pump with you (and explain it to airport security and Customs guys).



Some people would say that having other people (specifically, the baby's other parent) feed the baby is a pro, but IMO that's a red herring at best and actively detrimental at worst (when your MIL is visiting and bossing you around because you don't do things the way she would, would you rather sit on the couch and nurse the baby while she does your vacuuming, or sit on the couch with the breast pump while she gives the baby a bottle?).



I'm not trying to be snarky here, BTW. I've known people who for medical reasons had to pump for months before finally getting the baby on the breast, and believe me, pumping and bottlefeeding is not something you should contemplate doing on purpose in the mistaken belief that it's easier than breastfeeding, because actually it's much, much harder.

[deleted account]

The only real con for me was that it was difficult to go away for any amount of time unless I knew that I would have a safe place to pump and then to store my milk. I pumped for 3 1/2 months excusively and my son never latched properly, so I was pumping for 15-20 minutes every 3 hours. It was nice that other people could feed him, but I really hated being tied to the pump.

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Emily - posted on 01/26/2010

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you HAVE to have skin to skin in order to keep your milk supply. its fine to pump i did but i only had a manual breast pump and got sooooo sick of it and sore[my hand] ha so you would probably want to invest in a nice one not manual.

Monica - posted on 01/26/2010

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:) my first was an AMAZING eater on the breast, and my second, i thought would be a breeze, made my nipples bleed. it was really painful for about 2 weeks, but after that we both got used to each other and it was fine. She had trouble latching on, and i couldn't believe that a nurse had to help me since my first did it perfectly!! my daughter is 15 months now and has been off breastmilk for a month now. she's a big girl! i think that breastfeeding is so NATURAL. i mean, that's why it's there! :) so simple! :)

User - posted on 01/26/2010

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My baby wouldn't latch for nearly 6weeks so I pumped, managed to keep up the supply and then combined with breastfeeding I continued on pumping just because! I is more work but you get into a good routine and almost enjoyed bottle feeding my baby my breast milk reather than him taking it! it would take me less time to pump, store, heat and feed the baby than it would do breastfeeding him! he took soooo long it drove me nuts. All depends on what you want! good luck x

Mandy - posted on 01/26/2010

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My baby latched on really well and fed like a champ, but he was so aggressive that the pain was unbearable. I was engorged and my nipples were raw. It was too hard for me. Yet, I didn't want to give up on breastfeeding. I wanted my baby to have the milk. So, after 2 weeks I turned to pumping exclusively and it was a lifesaver. The first months with a newborn baby can be draining. For me, I was going on little to no sleep. I was getting up all night by myself since my husband had work at 6am and I stayed home. Then I would spend all day with my baby alone. I never had time to shower and was thoroughly exhausted. Breastfeeding only stressed me out even more. Pumping, though, allowed me to be able to feed the baby on demand without undressing every single time. I was able to have at least one extra bottle of milk and could have someone else feed my son while I pumped the next bottle. Once my supply built up, I was even able to refrigerate the extra milk and pump less often each day. Most of all, it was much less painful because it wasn't as aggressive. I don't feel that I was missing out on the bonding with my baby because I could still feed him bottles too and I still spent most of the day and night with him. The cons to pumping was that you don't get quite as much milk (your baby is the best pump possible), so you have to work harder/longer to get the same amount of milk. If you have to leave the room and pump, it can also be very isolating (depending on how often you have to do it). Getting the right pump for you can also be a challenge. I started off with a First Years single pump, which I liked a lot. It was very small and portable and had good suction. However, it's not intended to be used as often as I did, so the motor died after 2 months or so. Then I switched to a Medela double pump. The suction is good, but I struggled with holding both breast shields/bottles at one time. I felt like it inhibited my ability to multi-task. It also is huge and much harder to transport. I tried a Medela manual pump and even though it was fast, it was tiring and uncomfortable. I also was given a Playtex double pump. I liked this one because the shield was soft and comfortable and you could choose to do only one pump or two, but the suction wasn't as good. So, you have to find what's right for you.

My baby is now 5 months old and I am down to pumping once a day and supplementing with formula the rest of the time. I plan on weaning off breastmilk by 6 months just so I can have a bit more freedom. It's not an easy process, but pumping was the answer to my problems. I hope that info helps. :-)

Christa - posted on 01/26/2010

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i was planning on purely pumping b/c the breastfeeding thing freaks me out but i learned if the child doesn't latch on at least once a day your milk will dry up fast.

Monica - posted on 01/26/2010

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i found that breastfeeding directly just feels better, like a warmer closer connection.... but also, i couldn't pump!! it wouldn't work, but i'm lazy so the breastfeeding is the easiest thing!! no bottles to forget or clean no worrying about how long it'll keep in the fridge, etc... it's great to pump breast milk if you're working because it's the best thing for them, yay! :)

Jennifer - posted on 01/26/2010

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I exclusively pump for one of my twins who bites, I nurse the other one! If you get good at it, it's WELL WORTH IT!

Jennifer - posted on 01/26/2010

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i dont see the problem with it, i will mostly do most of the pumping when i got back to work, they will still get the nutrients from ur milk

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