question about foods. they say feeding your baby before a certain age is bad?

Brielle - posted on 03/20/2011 ( 119 moms have responded )

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and it causes obesity?..but my mom fed me mushed up bananas and all kinds of veggies and fruits at 3 months . she didnt have the money for formula. and guess what. im not obese at all. before i got pregnant i was 120 lbs. i dont get why these doctors want you to wait so long to feed your baby soft foods. ( i hear it makes them sleep longer) haha. has anyone else fed their babies early. if so how did it work out for them?

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Carolyn - posted on 03/22/2011

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im curious as to how a baby who is only days old can tell you he needs solid food ?



I think many people fail to realize that a baby's stomach is like the size of a peanut at birth, and at best a golf ball by 5 months.



It is completely normal for a baby to want to eat every 2-3 hours , if not sooner. Their tummies can only hold so much. The only thing a baby can do is cry, eat, sleep and shit at 3 weeks old let alone indicate a need for solids.



And i think all to often gas pain cries, or crying related to other things like oh say reflux or simply wanting to be with mom are often mistaken as a sign to start a baby on solids within weeks of birth.



I am absolutely flabbergasted.



A baby not wanting to sleep in their crib has absolutely nothing to do with what they are being fed. It is often a result of parents resulting to the path of least resistance ( oh hey he sleeps in the carseat lets use that ! ) and next thing you know, your baby will only sleep in the carseat, or being rocked, etc. Often taking the easy way out as a parent will only make things ten times harder in the long run when it comes time to change the behaviour because it is no longer convenient for us.



Wait till 4 months atleast to start your baby on solids. If baby seems hungry, increase the frequency of feedings and feed on demand and forget about scheduled feeding.



Most adults eat when they are hungry, most children have a snack between meals, why on earth we expect brand new babies to eat on a specific regime with a specific time frame is ridiculous.

Krista - posted on 03/22/2011

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when it comes right down to it, mom knows whats best for her baby. no amount of studies are going to change a mother's instinct, and you should ALWAYS go with your gut.

With all due respect...horsefeathers.

Mom doesn't always know what's best for baby. It's a nice thing to say, but if Mom always knew what was best for baby, we wouldn't need CPS, would we?

Being capable of pushing a child out of one's vagina does not immediately confer parenting wisdom upon a person. There are some women out there who have had a baby, and whom I would not trust to take care of a houseplant, let alone an infant. When people like that "go with their gut", you wind up with a laundry list of problems for the poor baby.

Yes, recommendations do change. They change as we find out new information. But as Jodi said, at no point in the last 20 years have any experts recommended solids prior to 4 months old.

Revision is not the same thing as regression.

Ez - posted on 03/24/2011

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Putting cereal in a bottle is force feeding my definition. They have no choice but to consume it with their milk.

Kate CP - posted on 03/22/2011

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My son is 8 weeks old. He has been nursing every 2 hours or so since he was born. Yes, even at night. Occasionally I'll get 4 hours of sleep but it's rare. My doctor's nurse has told me repeatedly to just give him cereal and I refuse to do so. He needs the nutrients in my breast milk, not empty calories found in rice cereal. Babies don't need solids of any kind until they can sit up on their own and are showing signs they are interested in solid foods.

[deleted account]

Geez, who would even want to do the extra work entailed in giving solids before you had to!

This conversation has been closed to further comments

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Jodi - posted on 04/03/2011

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Brandy, PLEASE stop coming in and commenting and removing your account. It is against the spirit of CoM. I am now locking this thread, so that you cannot continue doing it. The OP can thank you for that. If you have any further issues, contact me by private message.

[deleted account]

no it was personal attacks, it wasnt like i was sitting there telling everyone to shove solids in their babies mouth, i just gave my opinion... and to Krista E "LOVE" the sarcasm... but no "no one" is being rude

Stifler's - posted on 04/03/2011

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Okay then. I don't think anyone was rude, they just presented you with facts you don't "agree" with.

Jodi - posted on 04/03/2011

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And flagging my Mod warning will not help you. Please refrain from posting any further in this community.

[deleted account]

i never opened my account back up i just wanted to see how badly people were talking about me... ya'll know everything!

Jodi - posted on 04/03/2011

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Brandy, please don't open your account just to come onto a thread and call out another member, make abusvie comments and then remove your account again. This is unacceptable to CoM, and people have been permanently blocked for doing this.



Thank you

Jodi Adams

WtCoM Moderator

[deleted account]

you know... you people on here r just plain rude, just because we have an "opinion" doesn't mean that we r bad parents! my best advice for raising a kid to any parent is to read ur Bible it has all the answers u need! now lets see how many of u r going to bash me now? does it make ya'll feel good about yourselves talking down to us like that? like ur better parents? oh come on no one's perfect!

Krista - posted on 03/28/2011

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Well, I mean every medical body, and every child development expert recommends against early solids, as have the vast majority of the respondents to this thread.

But hey, Brielle's mom and Brandy both say it's okay. So what the hell does anybody else know, right?

Brielle - posted on 03/28/2011

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to brandy- Thats actually really ineresting. My mom said the saaame thing. Alllll these older people probably werent fed formula and most of them turne out okay? so im deff just going to listen to my gut. i noticed he didnt like his formula so i decided to put a tiny bit of baby apple juice in it and warmed it up. he eats sooooo much better now. Im glad my moms not the only one saying this. thankyou(:

Stifler's - posted on 03/26/2011

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I agree with Kathy, first solids were a pain in the arse with steaming and mashing and freezing and expensive if you're buying bottled food and the feeding taking forever. I can't imagine keeping up with that and washing bottles and feeding and burping and the rest of it.

Jodi - posted on 03/26/2011

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Oops, I forgot the seatbelts. Back when I was a kid, a lot of cars had no seatbelts in the back, and it was legal not to wear one. But I personally wouldn't drive anywhere unless every person in my car was strapped in properly. Because we know differently now.

Jodi - posted on 03/26/2011

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So....those studies that say your children could die if you decide not to restrain them in an appropriate child restraint doesn't mean they will. Back in the day when I was a baby, my mum held me in her lap, so I guess that means I should do that too, right, because I turned out ok, it didn't have any negative effect on me?

Or maybe I should rub alcohol on my kids gums when they are teething because that was the way it was done in my grandparent's day, and my parents seem to have turned out okay.

Oh, and on that note, I won't vaccinate my kids against anything, because I wasn't vaccinated against half of it (wasn't available back then) and my parents were vaccinated against virtually nothing (again, not available) because they turned out okay. Oh, wait, my dad has some chest muscle wastage from when he had polio - he was one of the lucky ones. But he still lives a full and active life, so yeah, they turned out okay, which means I don't need to vaccinate my children either.

Research has made MANY advancements and provided us with a lot more information since the day of our parents (and even, in my case, since I had my first child) that we really should pay attention to. Using the "but I turned out okay" really is a poor reason to ignore more current research.

Kate CP - posted on 03/26/2011

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You're right: you did it and NOTHING BAD HAPPENED.

When my mother had me she didn't have a car seat. Hell, they weren't even recommended when I was born. I rode on the floor boards in the back seat and NOTHING BAD HAPPENED! Doesn't mean it was a good idea, now does it?

Audrey - posted on 03/26/2011

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im not saying it is right and that you shouldnt take into consideration the studies. i knew what the studies said before i ever had my kids, but we tried it anyway(maybe i shouldnt have).what im arguing isnt that you should dismiss the study, but rather that just because the study says your baby will suffer from starting solids early, doesnt mean that they will. i was started a bit early and so was my husband and we never had any problems. plus i had friends that started thier kids early and non of us had any issues from it.

Jodi - posted on 03/26/2011

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And what the OP is looking for is validation of her beliefs, so essentially, you are validating them.

Jodi - posted on 03/26/2011

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I guess, Audrey, the problem I have with this is that you seem to think it was the right thing to do. I can understand as new parents doing something that perhaps is not recommended, but arguing until you are blue that it is right, and all the research is wrong, is just ludicrous. We all make mistakes as parents and learn along the way, but when we continue to outright ignore what the research says, we need to stop and take a step back, admit we probably shouldn't have, and move on, rather than arguing that what we did is right.

There have been many parenting issues where I have done that over the years, I have frequently changed my mind.

However, I will be honest and say that it shcoked me that anyone would consider it common sense to feed a 3 week old baby anything other than breastmilk or formula.....it wasn't even recommended back in the days when *I* was born (so we are talking the 60s), so why on earth would you consider it ok in this day and age?

Audrey - posted on 03/26/2011

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i wasnt advising anyone to do it. the original poster didnt ask for advice, she asked for other people's experiences with feeding solids early. i know it isnt advised to feed solids that early, and i cant remember if his doc knew, its been 3 years, but i think he did. the point is, i am not advising anyone, merely telling about my experience, and there is nothing wrong with that. like i said before, i didnt start my daughter tilo she was 9 months because she didnt want anything to do with it. part of the reason we started my son early was because we were over-excited new parents and wanted to see what he would do. he liked it, and he didnt spit it out, and it wasnt long til he was sitting up by himself and eating off a spoon.

Krista - posted on 03/26/2011

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well my son held his head up the day he was born and was holding it up really good by the time we started solids at 3 weeks.

I hope you contacted the newspapers about that one, because it's pretty much unheard-of for a baby to have any semblance of control over their head and neck muscles until they're roughly two months old.

Jodi - posted on 03/26/2011

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OK, well, try these ones:

http://raisingchildren.net.au/articles/w...

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids...

http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/s...

If you have problems with all of these, then show me a source that tells me feeding your child any sort of solid at 3 weeks is in anyway NOT harmful to them. Because I'm sorry, you should NOT be advising other parents to start a baby at that age without medical advice.

I have already asked once, did you discuss this with your baby's doctor?

Audrey - posted on 03/26/2011

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well my son held his head up the day he was born and was holding it up really good by the time we started solids at 3 weeks. he had also lost his tounge thrust reflex.so it wasnt force feeding!

Johnny - posted on 03/25/2011

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If your kids were young enough to still have the tongue thrust reflex when fed solids and were not able to hold up their own head, then you'd have to force feed them to get solid food into their mouth.

Jodi - posted on 03/24/2011

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Oh, Angela, it's not that simple. Women in this thread ARE reading their baby's cues apparently, and concluding they need to be fed practically on their way out of the womb.

Angela - posted on 03/24/2011

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Accoring to the American Pediatric Association 6 months is good to start solids for babies. Having a degree in nutrition I always recommended this time. Now that I have two babies I ended up started at 4 months they were sitting up in the high chairs with no problem and opened their mouths when the spoon came near and were able to swallow. Read your babies cues and see if he/she is capable and interested in eating.

Bonnie - posted on 03/24/2011

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To add to Erin's comment, babies don't know any different. They are hungry, it tastes good, of course they are going to take it.

[deleted account]

That's what you said about 3 pages ago..... That you were done at least. You're free to stop coming back and responding to this post as you've said you would do several times.

Audrey - posted on 03/24/2011

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omg! this is so tiring, i have better things to do! and i have never force fed my kids so dont even go there lady! im done.

[deleted account]

I started my daughter on solids at about 3 1/2 months because she wasn't gainning weight on breastmilk alone. She needed something. I went with my instincs on that one and started giving her mashed banana.

She's now 16 months old, eats like a horse and only weighs 21.5 lbs. She loves eating fruits and veggies too.

However is also no family history of food allergies. So that was far from a worry. I think it all comes down to instinct. If I hadn't my daughter would have starved; milk just wasn't enough.

I didn't give her a lot until she was almost 5 months. By that point I said screw what the medical community says I'm feeding her solids. She gainned 2 lbs and grew 2 1/2 in in 2 weeks... she went from 9lbs to almost 12. Yeah she needed it.

Jenny - posted on 03/24/2011

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Hi. I have three kids - two of which had allergies to milk. It's not just about obesity. It's also about their digestive system being underdeveloped. Give your baby the time she needs! Our society is so push! Push! Push! for early everything! We fed our eldest solid foods at 3 months and guess what? He had severe allergies - so bad his ear drum burst from repeat infections. He also had eczema all over his body but especially on his scalp/forehead (bleeding) and was blamed on cradle cap. Our second we waited until 6 months and although she was allergic to milk too, the signs were clearer and easier to detect. My advice, if it's not a money thing, research what I'm telling you about digestive development (especially if your breastfeeding) and you'll see - it's better to wait!

Tara - posted on 03/24/2011

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As a mom to six kids, all of them breastfed I can attest to the changes in the medical community over the last 18 years or so.
I was told with my first to introduce rice cereal at 4 months, moving through all other cereals before introducing veggies, then fruit, then meat, then dairy last.
With baby #2 I was given the same advice (96')
with #3 we were told to wait until 6 months for cereal.
same with #4.
By number 5, they said wait 6 months and give them whatever you are eating, mashed up of course. Still nurse as frequently as your baby desires, breastmilk first then solids at each feeding, because the breastmilk is still the main component of a healthy diet until at least age 12 months.
With #6. I was told not to even bother with cereal, that it can actually cause more problems and was not necessary as well that it was essentially empty calories that would only take the place of real food with real nutritional value. Told to offer breastmilk first until 12 months.
Never had a problem.
Feeding anything but breastmilk or formula to a newborn (pre 4-6 months) is ludicrous and I know of no medical professional who would ever recommend this practise.
None. Why? Because of science and factual information about a baby's digestive system.

Krista - posted on 03/24/2011

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I think in a lot of cases, this is projection. WE wouldn't be satisfied with a liquid diet. So, it's hard for us to imagine that our babies, with their rapidly growing bodies, could be satisfied off of liquids alone.

But, the liquids that adults drink are very different than the liquids designed for infants. Like Lisa said, calorie and fat content of breastmilk and formula are VERY high. That's some seriously rich stuff. And the proteins and vitamins in it are specifically designed (by nature or by man) to be more easily absorbed by a baby's immature gut. So they're getting a lot out of it. The proteins and vitamins in things like cereal, fruit, etc. are just not compatible with a baby's digestive system. That's not to say that it's guaranteed to hurt them. But, the odds are very good that all of the nutrients in those peaches are just passing into the diaper, unabsorbed by the baby.

So really, it DOES make more sense to feed the baby the right stuff, but feed him more often, if he still seems hungry, rather than giving him a bunch of food that is only going to physically fill the stomach but do jack-squat for his actual health.

Minnie - posted on 03/24/2011

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Calorie and fat content of common baby and toddler foods (including human milk and infant formula):

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/vitami...

Considering human milk or formula has more fat and calories than most infant foods why wouldn't one simply nurse more often or give a bottle more often? What sort of benefits is a bit of cereal or peaches supposed to give? Why not just give more of the milk? I simply do not see how giving something that has no fat and few calories as opposed to the milk which has more fat and more calories will increase weight gain.

For the record- if a baby is gaining weight, peeing and pooing the milk (human or formula) is 'satisfying' the baby. Wanting to nurse more frequently than every hour even is a normal behavior in infants. It isn't an indication that the baby isn't 'satisfied' with the milk.

Stifler's - posted on 03/24/2011

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The more I get notifications to this, the more I am inclined to think it's a joke.

Carolyn - posted on 03/24/2011

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Audrey , you clearly havent read the label on a jar of baby peaches. Im sorry but to state that it added nutritional value is ridiculous in my opinion



Gerber peaches stage 1

Serv. Size 1 pack

Servings Per Container 2 packs

Amount Per Serving

Calories 40

Total Fat: 0g

Trans Fat: 0g

Sodium: 5mg

Potassium: 120mg

Total Carbohydrates: 10g

Dietary Fiber: 1g

Sugars: 9g

Protein: 0g

%Daily Value

Protein: Not a significant source of protein Vitamin A: 6%

Vitamin C: 45% Calcium: 0%

Iron: 0%





Fresh Peaches



PEACHES: (one medium w/skin)

Calories

66

Calories from Fat 4 % Daily Value*

Total Fat 0.4g 1%

Saturated Fat 0.0g 0%

Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1g

Monounsaturated Fat 0.1g

Cholesterol 0mg 0%

Sodium 0mg 0%

Total Carbohydrates 16.2g 5%

Dietary Fiber 2.5g 10%

Sugars 14.3g

Protein 1.5g

Vitamin A 11% • Vitamin C 19%

Calcium 1% • Iron 2%





VITAMINS:

Vitamin A - 524 IU

Vitamin C - 19 mg

Folate (important during pregnancy) - 5.5 mcg

Niacin - .97 mg



MINERALS:

Potassium - 193 mg

Phosphorus - 12 mg

Magnesium - 6.9 mg

Calcium - 5 mg

Selenium - .4 mg

Also contains trace amounts of iron, zinc, manganese and copper.





When can my baby have Peaches in Baby Food Recipes?



Peaches are yummy, sweet and juicy. They pair well with a lot of other foods for baby such as chicken and bananas and avocado. Babies may begin to eat Peaches anywhere from 4 to 6 (six) months old.



and now look at the back of a can of formula.



Those processed peaches and cereal are robbing your newborn of what it needs.

Krista - posted on 03/24/2011

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Funny thing.... my daughter HATES rice cereal or oat cereal or any cereal to be honest. She won't eat it. I give her dry toast, blueberries, peaches.... anything she can gum. Maybe she's telling me something. Like, "Hey mom, this stuff tastes like shiznit. Gimme the good stuff"

Krista - posted on 03/24/2011

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ok well i dont think that there was enough in it to cause a digestive problem

I didn't realize we had a pediatric gastroenterologist on the premises.

Like Jodi said, sometimes these things don't show up until much later.

Think about it: how many adults of our generation have acid reflux or GERD? Quite a lot. It's very possible that these digestive problems could be linked to early solids as an infant. We don't know for sure (that's why WE'RE not experts.)

Yes, every mom knows her baby best, but we DO rely on the information of experts, in order to guide our decisions. Otherwise, we'd still be feeding babies watered-down Carnation milk and putting them in lead-painted cribs, people.

Joanna - posted on 03/23/2011

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My daughter is 5 months old (just turned, actually).

I breastfeed her every 1-2 hours, whenever she reaches for the boob, she gets it.

there is no way she is old enough to indicate a want/need for solid food. She reaches for my food, that's fine... she reaches for EVERYTHING. Doesn't mean she wants it. Now, if her weight was a concern and I got the go ahead from a medical professional, then I'd introduce rice cereal to cut down the calories from breastmilk. I actually was told by the doctor last week to do this (5 months old and 17 lbs). But she wasn't ready as she just spit every drop everywhere.

So how can a brand new baby be READY, or WANT/NEED it, if a 5 month old isn't? It's called force-feeding... you put it in their bottle, at that young it's instinct to suck, so they drink it, whether or not they want to.

And people say they're kids are fine... lets find out in 20 years if they're fine.

I was fed solids early and I have a milk sensitivity (which I just found out when I cut it out of my diet because my daughter was fussy) and IBS, as well as scoliosis, TMJ, and constant migraines. It could be unrelated, but who knows?

(sorry for the rambling, I only get like an hour of sleep total a day... because I have a baby who wakes up every 30 minutes).

Jodi - posted on 03/23/2011

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Audrey, this isn't about me being right. Everything I just gave you is fact. There are recommendations for a reason, generally for the health, safety and wellbeing of the child. But you can go back and put your head in the sand now if you like......after all, they aren't my kids, why should I care?

Ez - posted on 03/23/2011

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So why wouldn't you just continue feeding the amount of milk they require to satisfy them, rather than introducing solid food that their immature digestive system is in no way ready for?

Audrey - posted on 03/23/2011

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no its not hard to feed them breastmilk or formula and no one said it was.

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